News In and Around the Hughes Center
 
News: 

July 2013

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle Film Screenings
July 30, 2013

To mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s March on Washington, /To introduce four documentaries with riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America] the  Langston Hughes Center will offer a series of screenings, lectures, and discussion forums centered around the documentaries, Abolitionists, Slavery by Another Name, The Loving Story, and Freedom Riders.

Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities that uses the power of documentary films to encourage community discussion of America’s civil rights history. NEH has partnered with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to develop programmatic and support materials for the sites.

The Langton Hughes Center is one of 473 institutions across the country awarded a set of four films chronicling the history of the civil rights movement. The powerful documentaries, The Abolitionists, Slavery by Another Name, Freedom Riders, and The Loving Story, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all.  Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013.  

“These films chronicle the long and sometimes violent effort to achieve the rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence—life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness—for all Americans,” said Shawn Leigh Alexander, director of the Langston Hughes Center.  “We are pleased to receive a grant from NEH to provide programming around these films.

Each of the films was produced with NEH support, and each tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation. Created Equal programs bring communities together to revisit our shared history and help bridge deep racial and cultural divides in American civic life. Visit www.neh.gov/created-equal for more information.  

The Created Equal film set is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

More details about the program will be forthcoming.

December 2012

Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown – Summer Seminar for Teachers
July 21-29, 2013
University of Kansas

We are pleased to announce a special summer seminar for teachers to be held at the University of Kansas.  The Langston Hughes Center and the Kansas Collection at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library are collaborating with the Brown v. Board of Education National Park, the Brown Foundation, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to hold a seminar entitled “Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown.” This seminar will explore the road to Brown v. Board of Education (1954) and the fight for social and political equality in the years before the modern Civil Rights Movement. Participants will learn about this struggle at the Brown v. Board of Education National Park Service site, one of the five locations for the plaintiffs in the Supreme Court decision, and at the Presidential Libraries of both Eisenhower and Truman, who were uniquely involved in the road to Brown. Moreover, the participants will learn about the struggle from a number of experts, including plaintiffs from the Supreme Court case and Jack Greenberg, the former president and direct-counsel of the NAACP Legal and Defense and Educational Fund and a member of the legal team that prepared and argued the Brown case. Finally, the seminar will provide educational resources and professional training to secondary teachers interested in exploring the struggle for civil rights in America.

The seminar will be held from July 21-29, 2013 on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, KS.

October 2012

Make it Funky IV: Tribute of Lauryn Hill
October 18, 2012
“Make It Funky IV: Tribute to Lauryn Hill” will focus on women in hip hop. As in the past, the event will pair scholarly presentations with powerful performances that will appeal to students and faculty alike. It is fitting that event will look critically at Hill’s work. Most discussions of hip hop tend to ignore women rappers, and focus instead on critiques of male rappers and misogynist points of view. Although it's important to examine the contradictions of male rappers, it's also important to examine women artists themselves. We rarely consider women artists such as Hill. She is not only an infectious singer and rapper but perhaps the most insightful observer of social contradictions (e.g., gender, race, and class) in the entire history of hip hop.

Panelists for the event will include our own Nicole Hodges Persley (Theater Dept) and a brilliant University of Texas scholar named Meta DuEwa Jones who has recently published a book entitled The Muse Is Music.  In addition, there will be a spoken word artist named Natasha Ria El-Scari and a young woman rapper named MC Storm who writes and performs conscious lyrics. Storm will perform with her own drummer, Tyree Johnson, who is a young jazz musician who has performed in Kansas City’s celebrated Blue Room and other professional jazz venues. And, of course, the evening will conclude with a talk and performance by our keynote speaker Jessica Care Moore who rose to instant acclaim after appearing on the nationally televised “Showtime at the Apollo” and winning five weeks in a row! 

The event will be at 7pm Thursday, November 1st  in Alderson Auditorium in the Kansas Union.

September 2012

Project on the History of Black Writing receives grant for poetry institute
September 27, 2012
A grant awarded to a University of Kansas researcher from the National Endowment for the Humanities will spur the creation of an institute on reading and teaching African-American poetry.
The project is led by Maryemma Graham, a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of English in the KU College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. The institute, “Don’t Deny My Voice: Reading and Teaching African-American Poetry,” will be open to college and university teachers from across the country. NEH awarded $189,000 to support the program.
The institute will be guided by experts in the field and supported by the archival resources of KU’s Project on the History of Black Writing and the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University.
Graham founded and continues to direct the Project on the History of Black Writing, located within KU’s Department of English, which is the only archive of its kind and has been in the forefront of black literary studies and inclusion efforts in higher education for 29 years. This grant marks HBW's seventh from NEH and the fifth national institute in its 14-year history at KU. The institute will be coordinated by Sarah Arbuthnot Lendt, Project on the History of Black Writing grant specialist and KU English instructor.
“Don’t Deny My Voice” comes at a time of resurgence in interest in contemporary poetry, its expanded production and wide circulation. The program at KU will provide participants with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the range, diversity and popularity of African-American poetry, and to engage in projects for teaching and further research.
The institute will focus on the history and transformations of African-American poetry in cultural and social contexts over three critical periods: 1900-1960, 1960-1980 and 1980-present. Participants will examine the creation, production and performance of poetry, and consider new methods for reading, teaching and interpreting. This institute will be driven by key questions and themes focusing on the nature of black poetry in addition to those raised by individual presentations and panel discussions.
KU faculty working with Graham include Anthony Bolden, associate professor of African and African-American studies; Joseph Harrington, associate professor of English; William Joe Harris, associate professor of creative writing; Jill Kuhnheim, professor of Spanish and Portuguese; and J. Edgar Tidwell, professor of English.
Faculty from other institutions include Joanne Gabbin, director of the Furious Flower Poetry Center at James Madison University, Howard Rambsy II of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and Jerry W. Ward Jr. recently retired from Dillard University in New Orleans and currently an adjunct research associate, Department of English.
Scheduled for July 14 through Aug. 3, regular sessions of the institute will meet each weekday. A number of public events will occur during the institute, including a weekend field trip to nearby Kansas City that will include visits to the American Jazz Museum for a poetry slam and discussion with Kansas City poets. Participants will view the Furious Flower Poetry Center’s four-part video anthology over the course of the three weeks, with discussions following the films.
Collaboratively designed projects and subsequent webinars will extend the conversations and the application of knowledge gained from the institute beyond its three-week run. Webinars will be open to the public and will feature a group of intergenerational award-winning poets, including Rita Dove, Nikki Giovanni, Terrance Hayes, Liegh McInnis, Ishmael Reed and the 2012 U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Tretheway.
For more information, visit the Don’t Deny My Voice website.
The Department of English is part of the KU College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, which brings together the research and insights of more than 50 departments, programs and centers. In total, the College employs more than 50 percent of the Lawrence campus faculty.


Visiting Scholar to give presentations on black leadership, churches
September 19, 2012
A visiting scholar from Princeton University will deliver two public lectures this week that address topics at the intersection of his research in religion and African-American studies. The events are sponsored by the University of Kansas and community partners.

A collaborative program at KU will bring Eddie Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton University, to Lawrence as the 2012 Theologian in Residence and Visiting Scholar in Religion.

Glaude’s first public lecture, “The Crisis of Black Leadership” will be at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in the Big 12 Room in the Kansas Union. His second public lecture, “The Role of the Black Church in the Age of Obama” will be 7 p.m. Sept. 22 at Ninth Street Missionary Baptist Church, 847 Ohio St.

Glaude’s research focuses on American pragmatism, specifically the work of John Dewey, African-American religious history and its place in American public life. He has authored several books. His most recent book, the award-winning “In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America,” established him as a leader and visionary thinker of his field.

The Theologian in Residence series hosts scholars who represent a diversity of religious traditions, while bringing KU and the greater Lawrence community closer together through thoughtful conversations about issues that impact daily life and practical concerns. It supports presentations and dialogue on issues of faith and questions of religion. The program has brought many outstanding scholars to KU and the greater Lawrence community since 2001, including Marcus J. Borg, Amy-Jill Levine, John Dominic Crossan, Bart Ehrman and Peter Gomes.

“The strong crossdisciplinary support for a series of lectures such as those of Eddie Glaude’s demonstrates the commitment to those core principles of liberal arts education by the departments and the Langston Hughes Center and the Hall Center for the Humanities,” said Shawn Alexander, director of the Langston Hughes Center and associate professor of African and African-American studies.

The Theologian in Residence series is sponsored by many KU, community and religious organizations and programs. The KU sponsors include the Langston Hughes Center, the Hall Center for the Humanities, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Department of African and African-American Studies, the Department of American Studies, the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Political Science, the Department of Religious Studies and the Kansas African Studies Center.

The community and religious sponsors include Ecumenical Christian Ministries, First Presbyterian Church, First United Methodist Church, Trinity Lutheran Church, Trinity Episcopal Church, Plymouth Congregational Church, Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, First Baptist Church, St. Paul United Church of Christ, Ninth Street Missionary Baptist Church and St. Luke’s AME Church.

Many of the KU sponsors are part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The College enrolls about two-thirds of KU students and encompasses more than 55 departments, programs, centers, the School of Public Affairs and Administration and the School of the Arts. Nearly half of the students at KU earn their bachelor’s degrees from the College. Courses in the College cover hundreds of subjects including history, literature, chemistry, biology, art history, mathematics, anthropology, psychology, foreign language and political science.

KU Faculty Organize Public Discussion on Race, Space, and Gender
September 6, 2012

Professors at the University of Kansas who investigate contemporary social issues from varied perspectives will take part in a roundtable discussion at the Raven Book Store in downtown Lawrence.
At 7 p.m. Sept. 12, four faculty members will take part in “Race, Space and Gender: A Conversation with KU Faculty of African and African-American Studies and American Studies.” The panel members are Shawn Leigh Alexander, associate professor; Ben Chappell, assistant professor; Jennifer Hamer, professor; and Randal Maurice Jelks, associate professor. The event is free and open to the public.
The four faculty members will discuss regional and national social policy from the perspective of their various research interests, which range from civil rights history to Mexican-American culture to family life in urban areas to African-American religious history.
Jelks approached the Raven Book Store to host the event. He said that by bringing the conversation off campus and into the community, the goal is to demonstrate how the work taking place at KU is deeply concerned with issues that citizens encounter every day in Kansas and the Midwest.
“Certainly, I hope that attendees will leave our roundtable discussion thinking that what we do on KU's Mount Oread is important to their daily lives and practical concerns,” he said.
Jelks also wants the discussion to change the perception of social justice.
“I want people to walk away knowing that our concerns regarding issues of social justice in the United States is not framed in some weak-kneed sentimentalism or some vague understanding of being ‘politically correct,’“ he said.
All four faculty members have recently published books whose subject matter will inform the conversation. The books are “An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle before the NAACP” by Alexander, “Lowrider Space: Aesthetics and Politics of Mexican American Custom Cars” by Chappell, “Abandoned in the Heartland: Work, Family, and Living in East St. Louis” by Hamer, and “Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement: A Biography” by Jelks.
In addition to the Raven Book Store, the event is sponsored by the Department of African and African-American Studies, the Department of American Studies and the Langston Hughes Center.
The presenters are all faculty in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which is the largest and most diverse school at KU. The College enrolls nearly two-thirds of KU students and encompasses more than 55 departments, programs, centers, the School of Public Affairs and Administration and the School of the Arts. Courses in the College cover hundreds of subjects including history, literature, chemistry, biology, art history, mathematics, anthropology, psychology, foreign language and political science.

August 2012

Women, Gender, and Families of Color 
August 10, 2012
A ground-breaking scholarly journal has been launched by the University of Illinois Press in cooperation with the University of Kansas. Women, Gender, and Families of Color expands the mission of the now defunct Black Women, Gender, and Families. The new title explicitly includes black, Latina, indigenous and Asian-American women, gender and families. It will maintain an emphasis on examinations of U.S. policies and will encourage transnational comparative analyses. It will more fully integrate gender as an analytic category while strengthening interdisciplinary paradigms for the study of women of color, families and communities.
Women, Gender, and Families of Color is edited by Professor Jennifer Hamer of the University of Kansas Department of American Studies.
“Dramatically changing demographics demand that scholars center the past and present gender and familial experiences of blacks, Latinos, indigenous and Asian-Americans,” said Hamer. “Many within these populations persistently maintain institutions and lead cultural and social change. Yet, racialized women and families in the U.S. and abroad have historically known the brunt of austerity measures, crumbling infrastructures, rising costs of education, wealth inequality, and persistent gender, sexuality and class inequities. As an African-American mother, sister, daughter and partner, I am especially aware of the meaning these circumstances have on the health and development of children, the capacity of parents to provide for their families and the ability of workers to maintain meaningful employment. African-American, Latino, indigenous and Asian-American women and families serve as a national and global bellwether for our future. WGFC offers a cross-field venue that challenges readers to take seriously their social, cultural, political and economic significance.”
The Journal, which is to be published biannually in the spring and fall, is published by the University of Illinois Press and sponsored by the University of Kansas.
“This journal will shed new light on subjects in which many members of our faculty are deeply interested,” said Danny Anderson, dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences at KU. “Research projects in the College at KU frequently intersect on topics concerning women, gender, family and culture, while our esteemed interdisciplinary academic programs explore these fields in the classroom. Our affiliation with Women, Gender, and Families of Color is an excellent opportunity to support and contribute to this growing field of critical knowledge.”
To subscribe to Women, Gender, and Families of Color, please visit the journal’s website.


January 2012

Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown – Summer Seminar for Teachers
July 22-28, 2012
University of Kansas
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/education/seminar.php?seminar_id=144

We are pleased to announce a special summer seminar for teachers to be held at the University of Kansas.  The Langston Hughes Center and the Kansas Collection at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library are collaborating with the Brown v. Board of Education National Park, the Brown Foundation, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to hold a seminar entitled “Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown.” This seminar will explore the road to Brown v. Board of Education (1954) and the fight for social and political equality in the years before the modern Civil Rights Movement. Participants will learn about this struggle at the Brown v. Board of Education National Park Service site, one of the five locations for the plaintiffs in the Supreme Court decision, and at the Presidential Libraries of both Eisenhower and Truman, who were uniquely involved in the road to Brown. Moreover, the participants will learn about the struggle from a number of experts, including plaintiffs from the Supreme Court case and Jack Greenberg, the former president and direct-counsel of the NAACP Legal and Defense and Educational Fund and a member of the legal team that prepared and argued the Brown case. Finally, the seminar will provide educational resources and professional training to secondary teachers interested in exploring the struggle for civil rights in America.

The seminar will be held from July 22-28, 2012 on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, KS.

Secondary teachers interested in participating in the seminar visit <http://www.gilderlehrman.org/education/seminar.php?seminar_id=144> for application information.

APPLICATION DEADLINE - February 1, 2012

Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown 
Shawn Leigh Alexander, Director
University of Kansas 
1440 Jayhawk Blvd Room 9
Lawrence, Kansas 66045 
(785) 864-5044


November 2011

Angela Davis to speak at KU

Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies announces a lecture by Angela Davis, Distinguished Professor Emerita from the University of California, Santa Cruz, on February 7, 2012.  http://www.womensstudies.ku.edu/feb_sisters/index.shtml

Angela Y. Davis is known internationally for her ongoing work to combat all forms of oppression in the U.S. and abroad. Over the years she has been active as a student, teacher, writer, scholar, and activist/organizer. She is a living witness to the historical struggles of the contemporary era.

Professor Davis's political activism began when she was a youngster in Birmingham, Alabama, and continued through her high school years in New York. But it was not until 1969 that she came to national attention after being removed from her teaching position in the Philosophy Department at UCLA as a result of her social activism and her membership in the Communist Party, USA. In 1970 she was placed on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List on false charges, and was the subject of an intense police search that drove her underground and culminated in one of the most famous trials in recent U.S. history. During her sixteen-month incarceration, a massive international "Free Angela Davis" campaign was organized, leading to her acquittal in 1972.

Professor Davis's long-standing commitment to prisoners' rights dates back to her involvement in the campaign to free the Soledad Brothers, which led to her own arrest and imprisonment. Today she remains an advocate of prison abolition and has developed a powerful critique of racism in the criminal justice system. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Prison Activist Resource Center, and currently in working on a comparative study of women's imprisonment in the U.S., the Netherlands, and Cuba.

During the last twenty-five years, Professor Davis has lectured in all of the fifty United States, as well as in Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, and the former Soviet Union. Her articles and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, and she is the author of five books, including Angela Davis: An Autobiography; Women, Race, and Class; Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday; and The Angela Y. Davis Reader.

Former California Governor Ronald Reagan once vowed that Angela Davis would never again teach in the University of California system. Today she is a tenured professor in the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. In 1994, she received the distinguished honor of an appointment to the University of California Presidential Chair in African American and Feminist Studies.


October 2011

Spring 2012 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor

Tammy L. Kernodle, Associate Professor from Miami University in Ohio, has been named the Spring 2012 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor.  

Her scholarship and teaching has stretched across many different aspects of African American music but with an emphasis on the effects that gender, race, sexuality and regional identity have had on the creation, performance and reception of those musics. Her education includes a B.M. in Music Education (Vocal and piano) from Virginia State University, and M.A. and Ph.D. in Music History/Musicology from The Ohio State University. She served as the Scholar in Residence for the Women in Jazz Initiative at the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City and has worked closely with a number of educational programs including the Kennedy Center’s Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival, Jazz@Lincoln Center and NPR. Her work has appeared in Musical Quarterly, Black Music Research Journal, The Journal of the Society of American Music, American Music Research Journal. The U.S Catholic Historian, The African American Lectionary Project and numerous anthologies. She is the author of biography Soul on Soul: The Life and Music of Mary Lou Williams (Northeastern University Press). She served as Associate Editor of the recently released three volume Encyclopedia of African American Music (ABC-CLIO, 2010). Currently she is serving as one of the editors for the revision of New Grove’s Dictionary of American Music (Oxford University Press). A trained pianist and organist, she serves as Minister of Music and an Associate Minister at the First Baptist Church in Oxford, OH
She will give a public lecture, title to be announced, on February 23, 2012.  See the LHC Calendar for more details.

Since 1977, this visiting professorship has attracted prominent or emerging ethnic minority scholars to KU – from a broad range of disciplines and academic departments/schools. This one-semester appointment provides the recipient a stipend appropriate to the candidate’s rank, a small travel allowance, and a furnished apartment near the KU campus. The recipient will teach two courses during the semester of their appointment and deliver a campus-wide symposium on a topic or issue related to their discipline. 

To find out more about the LHVP see http://www2.ku.edu/~afs/faculty_staff/visiting_professorship.shtml
and http://www.diversity.ku.edu//programs/langstonhughes.shtml


William Tuttle Lecture
American Studies at KU announces the fourth annual Tuttle Lecture.

Darlene Clark Hine, "Rehearsal for Freedom: Black Professional Women’s Health Care Activism before Brown."  October 26, 2011.  4:30 pm @ Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union.

The fourth annual Bill Tuttle Distinguished Lecture in American Studies, Rehearsal for Freedom: Black Professional Women's Health Care Activism before Brown, presented by Darlene Clark Hine, Board of Trustees Professor of African American Studies and Professor of History at Northwestern University


January 2011

Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown – Summer Seminar for Teachers
July 24-30, 2011
University of Kansas
http://www.gilderlehrman.org/education/seminar.php?seminar_id=144

We are pleased to announce a special summer seminar for teachers to be held at the University of Kansas.  The Langston Hughes Center and the Kansas Collection at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library are collaborating with the Brown v. Board of Education National Park, the Brown Foundation, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History to hold a seminar entitled “Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown.” This seminar will explore the road to Brown v. Board of Education (1954) and the fight for social and political equality in the years before the modern Civil Rights Movement. Participants will learn about this struggle at the Brown v. Board of Education National Park Service site, one of the five locations for the plaintiffs in the Supreme Court decision, and at the Presidential Libraries of both Eisenhower and Truman, who were uniquely involved in the road to Brown. Moreover, the participants will learn about the struggle from a number of experts, including plaintiffs from the Supreme Court case and Jack Greenberg, the former president and direct-counsel of the NAACP Legal and Defense and Educational Fund and a member of the legal team that prepared and argued the Brown case. Finally, the seminar will provide educational resources and professional training to secondary teachers interested in exploring the struggle for civil rights in America.

The seminar will be held from July 24-30, 2011 on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, KS.

Secondary teachers interested in participating in the seminar visit <http://www.gilderlehrman.org/education/seminar.php?seminar_id=144> for application information.

APPLICATION DEADLINE - February 1, 2011

Presidential Politics, Civil Rights, and the Road to Brown 
Shawn Leigh Alexander, Director
University of Kansas 
1440 Jayhawk Blvd Room 9
Lawrence, Kansas 66045 
(785) 864-5044

October 2010

Spring 2011 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor

Clarence Lang, Associate Professor from the University of Illinois, has been named the Spring 2011 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor.  

Professor Lang brings an area of scholarship, urban studies, to the AAAS department that has been specified in the Strategic Plan of the department. Lang’s scholarship has focused on urban social movements and on black working-class culture and politics, particularly related to the urban Midwest. His has authored the book, Grassroots at the Gateway: Class Politics and Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis, 1936-75 (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2009). He also was co-editor of the book Anticommunism and the African American Freedom Movement: Another Side of the Story (New York: Palgrave, Macmillian, 2009); as well as published four book chapters and seven scholarly articles.
Professor Lang received his B.A, in Journalism with a minor in Black Studies from the University of Missouri-Columbia; an M.A. in History from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
He will give a public lecture, title to be announced, on February 24, 2011.  See the LHC Calendar for more details.

Since 1977, this visiting professorship has attracted prominent or emerging ethnic minority scholars to KU – from a broad range of disciplines and academic departments/schools. This one-semester appointment provides the recipient a stipend appropriate to the candidate’s rank, a small travel allowance, and a furnished apartment near the KU campus. The recipient will teach two courses during the semester of their appointment and deliver a campus-wide symposium on a topic or issue related to their discipline. 

To find out more about the LHVP see http://www2.ku.edu/~afs/faculty_staff/visiting_professorship.shtml
and http://www.diversity.ku.edu//programs/langstonhughes.shtml

Professor Lang’s Address: “At the Margins of Black Freedom Studies: Working-Class Representations and the Blues Idiom” http://www.diversity.ku.edu//events/clarence-lang.shtml


July 2010

Celebrating 40 Years of Africana Studies: Reflection and Visualization
(7/30/10)
During the month of October, in conjunction with the Kansas African Studies Center, the Langston Hughes Center will facilitate an interdisciplinary seminar series on the general topic of Africana Studies.  As a number of African American and African Studies Departments throughout the country, including KU’s AAAS Department, are celebrating 40 year anniversaries, LHC and KASC will hold a series of lectures to create a dialogue concerning the state, history, and future of African and African American Studies.  Check the Calendar for more details once the Semester begins.

April 2010

Make It Funky: An Exploration of African American Music and Poetry

The presentation will cover the development of African-American music and performance from before the Civil War to the present. Tony Bolden, professor of African and African-American studies, will share his expertise in how successive generations of singers, dancers, instrumentalists and poets have drawn from and built upon the practices, particularly rituals and dancing, that came before them.
“Make It Funky” will also feature the performances of improvisational slam poet Tracie Morris and funk bassist Scot Brown. Morris will discuss and perform her work, followed by a joint performance with Brown. Brown will also discuss the development of funk music in Dayton, Ohio.
Bolden developed the presentation to explore the extraordinary propensity for performance in African-American culture and the relation between music and the works of many innovative black writers. His teaching and research interests include African-American music, African-American cultural studies, popular culture, African literature and ethnic-American literature.
May 2, 2009.  2:00 - 4:00 pm @ Alderson Auditorium - Kansas Union


February 2010

Writing Jazz

The University Honors Program Lecture Series at the Commons during the Spring term will focus on the theme Writing Jazz.  Three lecture will occur during the term, by Fred Moton, Tammy Kernodle, and Paul Lopes.  For more information see http://www.honors.ku.edu/academics/commons.shtml and check the LHC calendar for dates, times, and titles of the lectures.

December 2009

Remembering John Brown
(12/02/09)
One hundred and fifty years ago John Brown was sent to the gallows for his raid on Harpers Ferry.  In 1959, on the centennial of the Raid and Brown’s death, Langston Hughes urged the readers of his Chicago Defender column to remember the Sage of Osawatomie.  Click here to read Hughes’ October 17.pdf and October 24.pdf articles. 

Amiri Baraka at KU
(12/01/09)
The Langston Hughes Center and the African and African American Studies Department are pleased to present the poetry reading portion of Amiri Baraka’s Marwa Lecture at the University of Kansas on November 3, 2009.  Click here to view the poetry reading: Baraka Poetry Reading at KU.

November 2009

Spring 2010 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor

Adam Banks, Associate Professor from Syracuse University, has been named the Spring 2010 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor.  He will give a public lecture, title to be announced, on February 25, 2010.  See the LHC Calendar for more details.

Since 1977, this visiting professorship has attracted prominent or emerging ethnic minority scholars to KU – from a broad range of disciplines and academic departments/schools. This one-semester appointment provides the recipient a stipend appropriate to the candidate’s rank, a small travel allowance, and a furnished apartment near the KU campus. The recipient will teach two courses during the semester of their appointment and deliver a campus-wide symposium on a topic or issue related to their discipline. 

To find out more about the LHVP see http://www2.ku.edu/~afs/faculty_staff/visiting_professorship.shtml
and http://www.diversity.ku.edu//programs/langstonhughes.shtml

October 2009

Marwa Africana Lecture
African and African American Studies at KU announces the fourth Marwa Africana Lecture.

Amiri Baraka, "Racism, Imperialism, and the Obama Presidency - Lecture and Poetry Reading"  November 3, 2009.  7:00 pm @ Alderson Auditorium - Kansas Union

“Making the (Richard) Wright Connection” Teaching Institute Funded

The University of Kansas and the Project on the History of Black Writing were awarded a $200,000 grant in support of the Making the (Richard) Wright Connection: Reading Native Son, Black Boy and Uncle Tom's Children from the National Endowment for the Humanities. In addition, the project is honored to be designated as a National Endowment for the Humanities "We the People" project, an initiative that is designed to encourage and strengthen the teaching, study, and the understanding of American history and culture.
Making the Wright Connection is a fifteen month program that follows the centennial of Richard Wright's birth and the many national and international celebrations commemorating his work in 2008. By incorporating both onsite and distance learning components, Making the Wright Connection will provide educational resources and professional training to secondary teachers interested in exploring the works of Richard Wright. The project will include a two-week institute and subsequent virtual institutes using the latest technology.
The institute will be held from July 11-24, 2010 on the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence, KS.
Secondary teachers interested in participating in the Institute will find Applications at the following site http://richardwrightat100.ku.edu/

For more information visit http://richardwrightat100.ku.edu/
or write wrightconnection@ku.edu

February 2009

William Tuttle Lecture
American Studies at KU announces the second annual Tuttle Lecture.

William Chafe, "From Jim Crow to the Civil Rights Movement: The Continuity of Struggle."  March 22, 2009.  6:00 pm @ Hansen Hall, Dole Institute of Politics.

“Despite the presumption that Jim Crow was a time of total white domination and total black submission, it was a time of ongoing resistance that laid the foundations for the civil rights movement. William Chafe is the Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of History at Duke University. He is the author and editor of twelve books. His work has focused on civil rights history, women's history, and modern political history. He helped to start the Duke Oral History Program, the Center for the Study of Civil Rights and Race Relations, the Duke-UNC Center for Research on Women, and the Center for Documentary Studies. He chaired the Duke history department from 1990-95 and was Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Vice-Provost for Undergraduate Education from July 1, 1995 to July 1, 2004. From 1999-2000 he served as President of the Organization of American Historians.”

January 2009

NEW MA in African & African-American Studies at KU

On January 15, 2009, the Kansas Board of Regents approved the establishment of a M. A. degree program in African & African-American Studies at the University of Kansas.  The Program will begin in the Fall of 2009 and the University is currently accepting applications.
 
Founded in 1970, the Department of African and African-American Studies seeks to educate students to function in a multicultural environment and in a global community. The objective of the M.A. program in African and African-American Studies at the University of Kansas is to produce scholars, teachers, administrators, and other professionals who have the intellectual and scholarly capacity and skills to make on-going contributions to the world in which they live.  
 
The African and African-American Studies M. A. program is designed to take two years of full time study. A total of nine upper-division and graduate courses, in addition to a thesis or additional course work for a non-thesis option, are required for the degree -- 33 credit hours. There are four core courses, Introduction to Africana Studies I: African-American; Introduction to Africana Studies II: African; Research Methods in Africana Studies; and Seminar in Africana Studies. The students are then expected to choose five courses, fifteen credit hours, within their area of specialization. Students are able to take six credit hours outside of the Department in related course offerings including, among others: American Studies, Anthropology, Art, Communications, Economics, Education, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Theater & Film, and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies.
 
For more information contact the Department of African & African-American Studies at
 afs@ku.edu  (785) 864-3054
 
or contact the Graduate Program Coordinator Shawn Leigh Alexander at
slalexan@ku.edu   (785) 864-5044
 
For more information about the Department visit us at http://www2.ku.edu/~afs/


Fight for Freedom! A Century of the NAACP and the Struggle for Racial Equality

The Langston Hughes Center at the University of Kansas announces, Fight For Freedom: A Century of the NAACP and the Struggle for Racial Equality.

Marking the centennial of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and honoring Langston Hughes’ 1962 history of the organization, this symposium (re)investigates the NAACP and its various legacies for a dawning new century.  This commemoration will also provide a powerful entry for larger conversations on race and racism in America today.

February 13, 2009 | 8 am - 5 pm | Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union, The University of Kansas

Visit the symposium link - Fight for Freedom - for more details.  

To register online or for more information, visit
 http://www.continuinged.ku.edu/programs/naacp/

October 2008

Spring 2009 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor

Henry Miller has been named the Spring 2009 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor.  He will give a public lecture entitled, “The Spiritual Origin of the Drama: Baldwin, Osiris, Dionysus, Eshu and the Bible,” on November 12.  See the LHC Calendar for more details.

September 2008

Michael Tilford Conference on Diversity & Multiculturalism:
“Changing Demographics: Is Kansas Ready?”
(9/12/08)
The Michael Tilford Conference on Diversity & Multiculturalism, sponsored by the Kansas Board of Regents and the Council of Chief Academic Offices, will be held at Wichita State University on October 2-3, 2008.  The focus of the conference is the changing demographics, both nationally and regionally, and its impact on higher education in Kansas.  For more information and registration go to the Office of the Provost’s Diversity Matters website.

Blacks and the United States Constitution
(9/9/08)
A traveling exhibit from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is on display at the Brown Foundation from September 1-30. This exhibition surveys the pivotal role of race in American Constitutional History.  Moreover, the exhibit places the role of African American freedom struggles in a perspective that reveals their relationship to the Constitutional history of all Americans.

Brown v. Board of Education National Historical Site | 1515 SE Monroe | Topeka, KS
Free and Open to the Public | Daily 9 am - 5 pm
For more information call the Brown Foundation at 235-3939 or email to brownfound@juno.com

Power, Place, and People: African American and Indigenous Stories
(9/9/08)
The Power, Place, and People: African American and Indigenous Stories exhibition visually illustrates the “Shifting Borders” project.  The exhibit includes photographs, documents, and artwork illustrating each participant’s oral story, and will be accompanied by a DVD featuring the oral history interviews.  The exhibition is on display at the Lawrence Arts Center from September 9-19.

On September 17 @ 7pm at the Larwrence Art Center Gallary, there will be a panel discussion on the overall project.  Panelists include, Daniel Wildcat and Mike Tosee from Haskell Indian Nations University, Maryemma Graham from the University of Kansas, and James Leiker from Johnson County Community College

To learn more about the Shifting Borders Project visit the project’s website.

Richard Wright Centennial
(9/2/08)
September 4, 2008 marks the centennial of author Richard Wright’s birth.  You may click on the Richard Wright Centennial webpage for more information about the author and his works.  Of special interest will be the events page which has information about a number of events and celebrations this week and throughout the rest of the year.  It also includes a slideshow of the conferences in France and Japan.

Finally, note that Julia Wright, Richard Wright’s daughter, will appear at KU on November 6.  See our calendar for more details.  LHC Calendar

July 2008

St. Luke’s AME Church
(7/19/08)
In June, St. Luke’s AME, the boyhood church of Langston Hughes, received a $60,000 Heritage Trust Fund grant to help restore the historical site.  St. Luke’s, located at 9th and New York, hopes to finish the restoration by 2010, the centennial of the site.  If you would like to learn more about the restoration or donate additional funds, contact the church at: St. Luke’s AME, 900 NY St.  Lawrence, KS 66044

June 2008

Jesse B. Semple Brownbag Series
(6/30/08)
The Langston Hughes Center introduces the Jesse B. Semple Brownbag Series every second Monday of each academic month.   The series is an informal forum for the African Americanist community and those who are interested in the general study of race, culture, and American society.  The Jesse B. Semple Brownbag will begin on September 8, 2008.  Check the Calendar for more details once the Semester begins. 

“Come to Africa and its here!” African Americans and Africa
(6/30/08)
During the month of October, in conjunction with the Kansas African Studies Center, the Langston Hughes Center will facilitate an interdisciplinary seminar series on the general topic of African Americans and Africa.  Through a series of presentations, KU faculty and invited scholars will discuss the relationship of African Americans to Africa in social, historical, and philosophical contexts.  Check the Calendar for more details once the Semester begins.

May 2008

Richard Wright Centennial
(5/20/08)
2008 marks the centennial of author Richard Wright’s birth.  His life and writings are being celebrated throughout the year and the Hughes Center will continually update its calendar with events happening locally, nationally and internationally.  You may also click on the Richard Wright Centennial webpage for more information about the author and his works.

Randal M. Jelks on Obama and Rev. Wright
(5/19/08)
Randal M. Jelks, Spring 2008 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor and incoming Professor of American Studies and African & African American Studies at KU blogs on the Barack Obama and Rev. Wright controversy.
Obama, Wright & Trinity

April 2008

Aimé Césare, Martiniquan poet and political activist, dies at age 94. 
(4/17/08)
“Césaire’s “Cahier” takes all that we have, Senghor, Guillén and Hughes, and flings it at the moon, to make of it a space-ship of the dreams of all the dreamers in the word”  Langston Hughes (“Draft Ideas,” LHP, December 3, 1964, Collected Works, v. 9, 408)

The Langston Hughes Center
(4/1/08)
The Langston Hughes Center, formerly the Langston Hughes Resource Center, is relaunching its activities at the University of Kansas and throughout the region.
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"So will my page be colored that I write?
Being me, it will not be white.
But it will be
a part of you, instructor.
You are white—
yet a part of me, as I am a part of you."  -- Langston Hughes (“Theme for English B,” 1949)