Professor elected to national Phi Kappa Phi board of directors

At its 2012 Biennial Convention hosted in St. Louis, Mo., The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines — filled seven vacant positions and welcomed back six members to its national board of directors.

New to the board is Angela Lumpkin, professor of health, sport and exercise sciences at the University of Kansas. Prior to her election as vice president for marketing and member benefits, Lumpkin served on the Society’s Budget Advisory and Review Committee. She also served as vice president of the KU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. Lumpkin is a frequent contributor to Phi Kappa Phi Forum, the multidisciplinary quarterly magazine of the Society.

Founded in 1897 and headquartered in Baton Rouge, La., Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. Phi Kappa Phi inducts annually approximately 32,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni. The Society has chapters on more than 300 select colleges and universities in North America and the Philippines. Membership is by invitation only to the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students and 7.5 percent of juniors. Faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction also qualify.

Since its founding, more than 1 million members have been initiated. Some of the organization’s more notable members include former President Jimmy Carter, NASA astronaut Wendy Lawrence, novelist David Baldacci and YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley. The Society has awarded approximately $14 million since the inception of its awards program in 1932. Today, $1 million is awarded each biennium to qualifying students and members through graduate fellowships, undergraduate study abroad scholarships, member and chapter awards and grants for local and national literacy initiatives. The Society’s mission is “To recognize and promote academic excellence in all fields of higher education and to engage the community of scholars in service to others.”