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Approved principal course distribution courses

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

There are 268 results.

A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC
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The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC
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An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course examines in detail the texts of speeches and essays on controversial issues in order to illustrate the varied forms of rhetorical action and the diverse modes of analysis and evaluation that can be applied to them. Examples are drawn from the rhetorical literature of contemporary U.S. speakers and prose writers. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course examines dance forms from throughout the world and how they relate to the times and cultures in which they evolved. Dance forms such as African, East Indian classical, European court dance, ballet, modern, and jazz will be studied through readings, master classes, live performances, videotapes, and films. Prerequisite: 200-level English course. LEC
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Through research and reconstruction, students will examine major topics in dance history, such as the meaning and function of dance in pre-industrial societies, communal and court dance in Europe from the 14th to the19th centuries, and the transformation and development of dance as a theatre art in the modern world. Texts by dance historians and treatises by dancing masters will be supplemented by readings from fields, such as anthropology, philosophy, art history, and literature, that indicate the different ways of approaching the history of dance. LEC
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Study of five or more significant novels representative of developments in the British novel of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program, an interdisciplinary program conducted with other humanities departments. British literature is studied in the context of visits to relevant sites such as London, the Lake District, and Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement; approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC
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Study of recent best sellers or other works of popular interest. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the English language, its historical development, and its grammatical structure. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
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An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
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A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
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Study of film as a visual art. Focus on communicative transaction between film viewer and film maker. Learning to read basic signs, syntaxes, and structures of cinematic language. Direct analysis of selected films. LEC
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An introduction to film and media aesthetics, including basic film/media theories and their practical applications. Students will be introduced to the concepts of time, space, composition, movement, editing, light, color, and sound. A key feature of the course will be a practical emphasis on learning how to see creatively by applying elements of design, camera lens and sound recording principles. Examples of these aspects of film and associated media will be examined and discussed in depth. Should be taken before or concurrently with FMS 275 or FMS 276. LEC
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A study of the artistic, economic, and sociological development of the American sound film with emphasis on the studio system, major directors, genres, and the impact of television. Analysis of selected films. LEC
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A history and critical assessment of the diverse images of African-Americans in American cinema and the impact of those images on American society. Screenings of feature and independent films, including those by African-Americans. LEC
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An interdisciplinary examination of popular cultural forms and their relationships with the social, political and economic dynamics of America, with emphasis on film, media, music, literature (including magazines and newspapers) and the graphic arts. The decade or other specific topic to be studied changes as needs and resources develop. May be repeated for credit for different decades or topics. LEC
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A comprehensive, interdisciplinary survey of French culture that may include topics ranging from the earliest times to the present, with particular attention to literature, the arts, thought, politics, society, food, and customs. Taught in English. Does not fulfill any requirement in the French major or minor. LEC
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Analysis of selected texts from various genres; special emphasis on explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 300 (or with FREN 300), or by departmental permission. LEC
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An exploration of the French capital from its origins to present as emblem and icon of the social, literary, cultural, and political development of the French nation and of French ideals. Topics include great persons, events, works, symbols, and myths since the founding of the city to the present. Taught in English. Does not fulfill any requirement in the French major or minor. LEC
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Readings and discussions of representative great masterpieces of French literature from the medieval Arthurian romances and chansons de geste to the present, with particular emphasis on the question of the interrelations of form and content. Includes such authors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Racine, Molière, Voltaire, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Gide, Camus, and Beckett. Conducted in English. A reading knowledge of French is extremely useful but not a requirement. LEC
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Discussion of landmark works in German drama, poetry, and prose. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films in their historical and cultural contexts. About fifteen full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the film's sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 124. Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films and their historical and cultural contexts. About 15 full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the films' sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussions in English on German intellectual thought, the fine arts, mythology, and folklore in historical and literary context. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Taught in English. For centuries German scientists, philosophers and poets have produced groundbreaking literature that has featured magic, monsters and the occult sciences. German poets introduced popular themes, such as the Faust legend and the pact with the devil, and they introduced one of the most popular monsters into literature - the vampire. In this course we will read and discuss fictional and nonfictional works by German authors that address these themes, and we will discuss the influence that these works have had on other nations' literatures. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. This course offers an introduction to art and culture in Germany. This is achieved by exploring a variety of themes, such as music, the arts, pop culture, theater and film. The course places special attention on the historical and cultural context from which these art forms were created. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. An introduction to Berlin as a microcosm of major historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments in German culture since 1800. Complex epochs such as Bismarckian Prussia, Nazi Germany, the Cold War and Unification are illustrated through diverse materials including news reports, poetry, sociological accounts as well as film and other media. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, and San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war, and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as EURS 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
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An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education, perspectives and methods in the humanities, the humanities and human diversity, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. LEC
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An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education; perspectives and methods in the humanities; the humanities and human diversity; and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
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Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. LEC
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Honors version of HWC 150. Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, or permission of instructor LEC
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A sequel to the two Western Civilization courses which offers the opportunity to examine influential works of literature, philosophy, history, and political thought written since the end of World War II. In keeping with the decline of colonialism and the growth of global and multicultural civilization since 1945, the readings of the course are selected from both Western and non-Western writers. LEC
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The study of great books in English translation from antiquity through the fifteenth century from two or more national literatures. LEC
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The study of great books in English translation from the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries from two or more national literatures. LEC
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The study of great books in English translation in the modern period (late nineteenth and twentieth centuries) from two or more national literatures. LEC
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An introduction to the literature of encounters between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as EURS 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
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Survey of Italian culture with study of geography, history, government, education, Roman archaeology, and music. Lecture, discussion, and supportive readings. Not open to native speakers of Italian. LEC
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The course focuses on the narratives through which Jews made sense of their lives under the impact of the forces of modernity, beginning in the "old world," and moving through the 19th century and into the 20th. The goal is to analyze how the imagination of Jewish writers was captured by the changes in social structures such as new educational, residential and occupational opportunities, leading to increased interactions with the gentile society. Students read and discuss literary works based in the shtetl in revolutionary Russia, and in America. We will also look at memoirs and letters written by ordinary Jews. All assigned texts will be in English. LEC
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By examining the modern concept of Yiddishkeit (Jewishness), this course explores Jewish secularism as a set of modern intellectual, literary, and cultural practices that redefined the relationship between the secular and religious in literature, music, theatre, art, humor, and foodways. This interdisciplinary course draws on theoretical approaches from history, cultural studies, religious studies, folklore, and linguistics to examine the different secularizing cultural practices of the Jews in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as in North America. LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and EURS 329.) LEC
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A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1515) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as EURS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
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Introduction to Brazilian cultural and literary studies. Critical readings and interpretation of Brazilian cultural expressions with emphasis on acquiring the skills and vocabulary for discussing and writing critical analyses. Conducted in Portuguese. Not open to students who have taken PORT 540. Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in PORT 216 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of PORT 340. Not open to students who have taken PORT 340. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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This course presents an introduction to the study of the culture of the South Slavs and other peoples of Southeastern Europe, combining background modules in geography, linguistic culture, history, folklore and contemporary cultural criticism with critical 16 viewings of artistic films. The course serves as an introduction to humanistic inquiry about the peoples and cultures of Southeastern Europe. LEC
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This course is similar in content to SLAV 316, but with an additional honors project. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to the university Honors Program. LEC
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The development of social and cultural patterns in Spanish America, and their relationship to economic issues and personal values. A topical study of the historical development of Spanish American institutions will be followed by an examination of twentieth-century cultural patterns. Special emphasis on Mexico. Most of the readings will be in English. Will not count toward the Spanish major. Prerequisite: SPAN 108, or SPAN 109, or SPAN 111, or two years of high school Spanish. LEC
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Critical readings and interpretation of Hispanic literatures, with emphasis on acquiring the skills and vocabulary necessary for discussing and writing literary analyses. Prerequisite: SPAN 323 or SPAN 324, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed to help students by means of experience with theatre as well as study about it to achieve an understanding of its cultural role in contemporary society, to develop a sensitive and informed appreciation of its art, and to make it an integral part of their cultural lives. Lectures, discussion groups, special interest groups, theatre attendance. LEC
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Fundamental techniques in acting. Practice in character creation, body language, and effective stage speech. LEC
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Conceptualization and visualization of the elements involved in creative design for theatre, dance, television, and film. LEC
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Interdisciplinary examination of popular culture oriented around a specific genre or theme. Objects of study may include popular forms of live performance such as musicals or vaudeville, as well as media-based performances (radio, television, film, internet). Specific topic to be studied changes as needs and resources develop. May be repeated for credit for different topics. LEC
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Exploration of forms, methods, and materials appropriate for development of elementary-age children in dramatic arts. LEC
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This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Does not complete major requirement. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 304. LEC
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An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia. By reading translations of original source materials, the student is able to see the interaction among the various cultures as well as their essential continuity. The course is most appropriate for students without any background in Asian culture. Offered for students with superior academic records. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia, and explores the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. Course materials include translations and discussions of original sources. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. Not open to students with credit in ECIV 104. If majoring in EALC and have completed ECIV 104, see major adviser about completing the ECIV 304 major requirement. LEC
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An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of East Asia. By reading translations of original source materials, the student is able to see the interaction among the various cultures as well as their essential continuity. The course is most appropriate for students without any background in Asian culture. Similar to ECIV 304, but reading and writing assignments reflect the fact that this is an honors course. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A broad introduction to religion in American culture. This class emphasizes the well-established religions with large followings (viz. Judaism, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism). Some attention is also given to other religions active in America. Other topics covered include the relationship of church and state, religion in ethnic and racial minority groups, and women and religion. Not open to students who have taken REL 172. (Same as REL 171.) LEC
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Historical survey of theories of communication and persuasion, the people who produced them, and the philosophical assumptions upon which they rest. Beginning with the Greeks, especially Plato and Aristotle, and ending with selections from Kenneth Burke and other contemporary figures, the course focuses on changing concepts of rhetoric throughout a time span of some 2000 years. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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An introductory examination, based primarily on writings of major philosophers, of such central philosophical problems as religious belief, the mind and its place in nature, freedom and determinism, morality, and the nature and kinds of human knowledge. LEC
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An introductory examination, based primarily on writings of major philosophers, of such central philosophical problems as religious belief, the mind and its place in nature, freedom and determinism, morality, and the nature and kinds of human knowledge. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC
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An introductory study of the nature of morality and of philosophical bases for the assessment of actions, agents, and institutions. Special emphasis will be placed upon the views of such important philosophers as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Some attention will be paid to applications of moral theory to practice. LEC
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An introductory study of the nature of morality and of philosophical bases for the assessment of actions, agents, and institutions. Special emphasis will be placed upon the views of such important philosophers as Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Some attention will be paid to applications of moral theory to practice. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC
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An introductory study, based primarily on classic philosophical texts, of such central issues as the justification of governmental authority, the social sources of power, the nature of a just distribution of social resources, competing conceptions of human nature, and the proper limits of governmental interference with individual liberty. LEC
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An introductory study, based primarily on classic philosophical texts, of such central issues as the justification of governmental authority, the social sources of power, the nature of a just distribution of social resources, competing conceptions of human nature, and the proper limits of governmental interference with individual liberty. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of department. LEC
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A philosophical analysis of theoretical and ethical issues that arise in the practice of the life sciences. Discusses the conceptual foundation of the life sciences--evolutionary theory and genetics. Critically explores the use of statistical and non-human-animal models. Examines ethical issues including problems that arise in human and other animal experimentation, obligations to the environment, proper use of patents, and conflicts in professional duties. LEC
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A survey of the thought of the principal philosophers of ancient Greece, with emphasis on the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. LEC
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A survey of the writings of such principal philosophers of the modern period as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. LEC
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This course introduces students to the academic study of religions. It acquaints students with key methods and issues in religious studies, and provides an introductory survey of selected religions. Not open to students who have taken REL 105. LEC
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This course introduces students to the academic study of religions. It acquaints students with key methods and issues in religious studies, and provides an introductory survey of selected religions. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 104. LEC
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A basic introduction to the major religious traditions of the Near East, Europe, and the Americas, with an emphasis on their development through the modern period and their expressions in contemporary life. Not open to students who have taken REL 109. LEC
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A basic introduction to the major religious traditions in the Near East, Europe, and the Americas, with an emphasis on their development through the modern period and their expressions in contemporary life. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 107. LEC
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An introduction to the literature of the Bible, exploring the relationships among the various types of literature present and the function of each type in the history and religious life of the people who produced and used them. Cannot be taken concurrently with REL 311 or REL 315. Not open to students who have taken REL 125. LEC
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An introduction to the literature of the Bible, exploring the relationships among the various types of literature present and the function of each type in history and religious life of the people who produced and used them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 124. LEC
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A broad introduction to religion in American culture. This class emphasizes the well-established religions with large followings (viz. Judaism, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism). Some attention is also given to other religions active in America. Other topics covered include the relationship of church and state, religion in ethnic and racial minority groups, and women and religion. Not open to students who have taken REL 172. (Same as AMS 290.) LEC
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Honors version of REL 171. A broad introduction to religion in American culture. This class emphasizes the well-established religions with large followings (viz. Judaism, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism). Some attention is also given to other religions active in America. Other topics covered include the relationship of church and state, religion in ethnic and racial minority groups, and women and religion. Not open to students who have taken AMS 290. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Not open to students who have taken REL 108/EALC 108. (Same as REL 106.) LEC
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 106/EALC 105. (Same as REL 108.) LEC
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Not open to students who have taken REL 108/EALC 108. (Same as EALC 105.) LEC
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan, with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 106/EALC 105. (Same as EALC 108.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of the history of the African peoples of the New World, relating their cultures and institutions to the African background and to their peculiar New World experiences up to and including the nineteenth century. While the main emphasis will be on the U.S.A., attention will also be paid to the Caribbean and Latin America. Approaches will include demography, economics, social and political developments, literature, and music. LEC
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An intensive version of AAAS 106. Open only to students on Dean's Honor Roll or enrolled in Honors Program, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 101. LEC
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An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 100. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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A general introduction to the study of archaeology. Evolution of prehistoric cultures in adaptive response to changing natural and social environments, from the early Paleolithic to the emergence of urban civilizations. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 110 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 110. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 110 or ANTH 111. LEC
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An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussion in English on the immigration and acculturation of German-speaking ethnic groups in Colonial America and the United States. Emphasis on Americanization during the Colonial period, discrimination in the pre-Civil War era, integration in the post-Civil War era, anti-German hysteria during the World War I era, exiles during the Nazi period, and the near total assimilation of this ethnic group in the United States during the 20th century. LEC
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Taught in English. Provides a general introduction to German culture and its transformations in international contexts through an examination of the historical, cultural, and literary impact of German emigration and immigration. Historical periods covered include the emigration wave to America after the failed 1848 revolution, the exile communities during the Nazi era, and the multinational migrations in contemporary Germany. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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A chronological survey of Western art and architecture, including the ancient Near East, Europe from antiquity to the present, and North America from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes major historical and cultural developments, analyzes key art works and monuments, and introduces basic art historical principles and analytical methods. The course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels, with additional reading and writing assigned at the 300 level. Not open to students with credit in HA 103, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161, or HA 300. LEC
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A chronological survey of Western art and architecture, including the ancient Near East, Europe from antiquity to the present, and the Americas from the colonial period to the present. The course emphasizes major historical and cultural developments, analyzes key art works and monuments, and introduces basic art historical principles and analytical methods. The course is offered at the 100 and 300 levels, with additional reading and writing assigned at the 300 level. Not open to students with credit in HA 100, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161, HA 300, or HA 303. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
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A survey of the art of earlier periods in the West, from prehistoric times through the middle ages in Europe, with special emphasis on the relationship between artistic developments and cultural changes. Not open to students with credit in HA 100, HA 103, HA 160, or HA 300. This course does not fulfill the ancient-medieval requirement for majors. LEC
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Honors section of HA 150. Students taking HA 150 for Honors credit must enroll in HA 160. They will attend HA 150 lectures and Honors discussion group led by the professor in charge of the course. LEC
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A general survey of painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphic art of the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is placed on major movements and their artists, including Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Art, Pop Art, and the developments of the contemporary period. LEC
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An introduction to art and architecture in Western culture. Basic principles and problems of the visual arts are analyzed as are the major historical trends and periods. Style, content, and cultural backgrounds are discussed and illustrated by slides and original material in the Spencer Museum of Art. Not open to students with credit in HA 100, HA 103, HA 150, HA 151, HA 160, HA 161,or HA 300. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
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A study of the art of the British Isles from the Anglo-Saxon period to 1900, with emphasis on Anglo-Saxon, Norman, and Gothic monuments, 18th-century architecture, and 18th- and 19th-century painting. Prerequisite: Nine hours of history of art, or a major in history or English. LEC
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An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. LEC
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An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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The history of Europe from the Barbarian Invasions to the beginning of the 16th century. LEC
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An introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the cultural, political, economic, and social processes and events which helped to shape the modern world: The renaissance, the rise of the nation states, the Reformation, absolutism, and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution. Not open to students who have taken HIST 114. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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An introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the cultural, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to shape the modern world. The renaissance, the rise of nation states, the Reformation, absolutism and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution. LEC
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An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: the French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war, and its aftermath. LEC
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An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: The French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war and its aftermath. Not open to students who have taken HIST 115. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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A survey of the evolution of Russia from its origins to the present. The focus will be on the interaction of government and society and on internal and external pressures affecting modernization and reform, revolution, and territorial expansion. LEC
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Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform or revolution in the 20th Century. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. In this way the course deals with interpretations of the processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. LEC
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Similar in content to HIST 121. Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform and revolution in the 20th century. In this way the course deals with interpretations of these processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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A historical survey of the United States from the peopling of the continent through the Civil War. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. LEC
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A historical survey of the American people from Reconstruction to the present. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events that shaped American history. LEC
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A historical survey of the United States from the peopling of the continent through the Civil War. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. Not open to students who have taken HIST 128. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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A historical survey of the American people from Reconstruction to the present. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. Not open to students who have taken HIST 129. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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This course examines the social, cultural, and political contexts of women's spirituality and their relations to gender relations in Europe from about 30,000 B.C.E. to the 16th century Protestant Reformation. Lectures move both chronologically and topically, covering such subjects as goddess-worshiping cultures, women's roles in Christian and Jewish societies, symbols of women, and male attitudes toward women. Students will be able to participate in weekly discussions of primary and secondary source readings about women. (Same as WGSS 320.) LEC
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This survey of women's history in Europe looks at changing patterns of women's economic roles and family structures in preindustrial and industrial society, the importance of women in religious life, cultural assumptions underlying gender roles, and the relationship of women to political movements, including the rise of feminism. (Same as WGSS 321.) LEC
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The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as EURS 302.) LEC
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Designed to aid non-music majors in developing the skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music. Open only to freshman and sophomore non-music majors. A student may receive credit in either MUSC 136 or MUSC 336, but not both. LEC
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A survey of the history of jazz from its beginnings in the early twentieth century to the present. Open to music and non-music majors. LEC
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A survey course for non-majors on the history of film music from silent films to the present. Students will use written texts, website materials such as streaming video and audio, and regular screening in an auditorium setting for assignments and papers. LEC
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Designed to aid non-music majors in developing the skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music and writing about music. Open only to junior and senior non-music majors. A student may receive credit for either MUSC 136 or MUSC 336, but not both. LEC
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A selected topic in music or an interdisciplinary topic in the fine arts. The course may be repeated for credit when topic varies. Open only to non-music majors. LEC
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An introduction to the content and methods of peace studies. Peace studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of war and peace. Building on and integrating the work of various fields of study, the course examines the causes of structural and direct violence within and among societies and the diverse ways in which humans have sought peace from conquest and balance of power to international organizations and nonviolent strategies. LEC
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Prehistoric and colonial Portuguese origins of Brazil and its independent development in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Key aspects of economic, political, and social factors; special attention to intellectual history. Readings in English. LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. LEC
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An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course examines the social, cultural, and political contexts of women's spirituality and their relations to gender relations in Europe from about 30,000 B.C.E. to the 16th century Protestant Reformation. Lectures move both chronologically and topically, covering such subjects as goddess-worshiping cultures, women's roles in Christian and Jewish societies, symbols of women, and male attitudes toward women. Students will be able to participate in weekly discussions of primary and secondary source readings about women. (Same as HIST 320.) LEC
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This survey of women's history in Europe looks at changing patterns of women's economic roles and family structures in preindustrial and industrial society, the importance of women in religious life, cultural assumptions underlying gender roles, and the relationship of women to political movements, including the rise of feminism. (Same as HIST 321.) LEC
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An introduction to Asian art and architecture through a study of the principal monuments, their aesthetic principles, and their relation to philosophies and religions. LEC
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An introduction to the visual arts of China, Korea, and Japan, with equal time given to each country. Emphasis will be placed on cultural context, including religion, social class and gender, and on the cultural interaction between the three countries. LEC
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Lecture and discussion sections covering the mechanisms and principles of Darwinian evolution with special emphasis on human and primate data. Lecture topics include genetics, variation, primate ethology, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Discussion sessions include topics in Mendelian and population genetics, blood group systems, quantitative morphological variation, and fossil human and primate skeletal material. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 104 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105. LEC
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Intended for non-science majors. The basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. An honors section, BIOL 101, is offered for students with superior academic records. BIOL 100 and BIOL 102 (or BIOL 101 and BIOL 103, honors) satisfy the College natural science with laboratory requirement. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 102 is recommended. LEC
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Intended for non-science majors with superior academic records. The basic concepts of biology at the cellular, organismal, and population levels of organization and their applications to humans and modern society. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 103 is recommended. BIOL 101 and BIOL 103 satisfy the College natural science with laboratory requirement. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A course for students who are not science majors. Designed to acquaint students with some microbial activities which affect their lives. Includes the historical development of microbiology, the basic principles of microbial growth, disinfection, antibiotics, infection, and immunity; and some commercial, agricultural, and industrial uses of microorganisms. Emphasis is on infectious diseases. Not open to students with any credit in microbiology. May not be counted as a prerequisite for any other microbiology course. LEC
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Students will learn about the global impact of insects on human concerns, both positive (pollination and decomposition) and negative (competition with humans for food, fiber, and shelter, and disease transmission) while developing an appreciation for the ways in which scientists work with real problems involving insects. The course will cover the overwhelming abundance and diversity of insects, and their life history, ecology, behavior, and physiology. This course is intended for both nonbiology and biology majors. Format: two lectures and one discussion section per week. LEC
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An integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students planning to take additional courses in biology. This course cover basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, physiology, and development of plants and animals. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. An honors section (BIOL 151) is offered for students with superior academic records. Concurrent or prior enrollment in CHEM 184 is recommended. LEC
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An integrated lecture and laboratory course for students with superior academic records who are biology majors or who plan to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, physiology, and development of plants and animals. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Concurrent or prior enrollment in CHEM 184 is recommended. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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An integrated lecture and laboratory course for biology majors and students who plan to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic elements of plant and animal morphology and physiology, principles of evolution, organismal diversity and phylogeny, population biology, population genetics, ecology, and behavior. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. An honors section (BIOL 153) is offered for students with superior academic records. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151. LEC
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An integrated lecture and laboratory course for students with superior academic records who are biology majors or planning to take additional courses in biology. This course covers basic elements of plant and animal morphology and physiology, principles of evolution, organismal diversity and phylogeny, population biology, population genetics, ecology, and behavior. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to bacteria and viruses. Topics include historical development of microbiology, bacterial structure and growth, enzymes and energy production, disinfection, antibacterial drugs, gene transfer, viral replication, infection and immunity, with emphasis on infectious diseases. Can be substituted for BIOL 201 as a prerequisite for other microbiology courses by consent of department. Not open to those with credit in BIOL 110, BIOL 201, BIOL 400, or BIOL 401. Prerequisite: A course in high school biology and a course in high school chemistry. This course is not recommended for first semester freshmen. LEC
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Examines the evolution of plants and their environments from the origin of life to the present, including the historical development of the biosphere, mass extinctions (past and present), and social implications of future climate changes and deforestation. Not recommended for students with credit in GEOL 121. LEC
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Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis on physical and chemical properties of the bacterial cell; microbial metabolism, cultivation, growth and death of bacteria; microbial genetics, pathogenesis and immunity, industrially important microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and two semesters of college chemistry, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Lectures. Fundamental principles of microbiology with emphasis in physical and chemical properties of the bacterial cell; microbial metabolism, cultivation, growth and death of bacteria; microbial genetics; pathogenesis and immunity, industrially important microorganisms. Meets with BIOL 400, but students will be given additional and more advanced assignments, and will carry higher expectations. Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 151 and two semesters of college chemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. (Same as GEOG 148.) LEC
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This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of EVRN 148, designed for superior students. (Same as GEOG 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC
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This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. (Same as EVRN 148.) LEC
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This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of GEOG 148 designed for superior students. (Same as EVRN 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC
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An introduction to the history of life and the origin and evolution of animals and plants during the earth's long history. The fossil record is interpreted by applying both biological and geological principles. LEC
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A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. LEC
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Honors version of ATMO 105. A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. Prerequisite: Membership in University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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An introductory lecture course which surveys the general principles and techniques of atmospheric science and illustrates their application through discussions of natural but unusual weather phenomena such as blizzards, hurricanes, tornados, and chinooks, of the effects of air pollution on weather, and of intentional human alteration of the atmosphere. LEC
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A survey of current methods of describing and modeling the function, structure, and productivity of natural and anthropogenically modified earth resource systems, along with a discussion of contemporary views of what constitutes a natural landscape. Fundamental natural science principles about the interplay among lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrospheric, and biospheric components of earth systems are emphasized. Uses of natural resources, including fossil fuels, minerals, and water, are described with attention to the earth's total energy budget. Human activities that affect preservation, conservation, and multiple uses of earth regions receive attention. Systems under stress through population and other contemporary forces serve as examples. (Same as GEOG 304.) LEC
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The components of the physical environment are discussed in order to familiarize the student with their distributions and dynamic nature. Major topics include the atmosphere, landforms, soils, and vegetation together with their interrelationships and their relevance to human activity. This course and GEOG 105 together satisfy the laboratory science requirement. Both courses are required for geography majors. LEC
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Interactive processes among the systems of the earth are studied and discussed. Major topics include vegetation, soils, landforms, water, the atmosphere, and cycles of matter between these portions of the earth. The course includes lectures and critical discussions to address study problems in physical geography. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of the instructor. LEC
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A survey of current methods of describing and modeling the function, structure, and productivity of natural and anthropogenically modified earth resource systems, along with a discussion of contemporary views of what constitutes a natural landscape. Fundamental natural science principles about the interplay among lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrospheric, and biospheric components of earth systems are emphasized. Uses of natural resources, including fossil fuels, minerals, and water are described with attention to the earth's total energy budget. Human activities that affect preservation, conservation, and multiple uses of earth regions receive attention. Systems under stress through population and other contemporary forces serve as examples. (Same as EVRN 304.) LEC
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Introduction to the principles of earth science. Study of the formation, occurrence, and structure of minerals and rocks; action of streams, oceans, glaciers, and other agents in the formation and modification of the landscape; volcanism, earthquakes, and plate tectonics. This course with GEOL 103 satisfies the College laboratory science requirement. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 103 is recommended for students taking both. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. LEC
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Honors section of GEOL 101. An introduction to the principles of earth science. Study of the formation, occurrence, and structures of minerals and rocks; action of streams, oceans, glaciers, and other agents in the formation and modification of the landscape; mountain building volcanism, and earthquakes. Not open to students who have taken GEOL 101. This course with GEOL 103 satisfies the College laboratory science requirement. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 103 is recommended for students taking both. LEC
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An introduction to the physical and biological history of the earth, the methods used to decipher earth history, and the development of the geological sciences. This course with GEOL 103 satisfies the College laboratory science requirement. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 103 is recommended for students taking both. Not open to students who have taken GEOL 106 or GEOL 304. LEC
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Honors section of GEOL 105. An introduction to the physical and biological history of the earth, the methods used to decipher earth history, and the development of the geological sciences. This course with GEOL 103 satisfies the College laboratory science requirement. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 103 is recommended for students taking both. Not open to students who have taken GEOL 105 or GEOL 304. LEC
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Addresses the subject of natural disasters with concentration on earthquake effects and their mitigation. Briefly treats volcanic eruptions, tidal waves, floods, global warming, severe weather, and catastrophic meteorite impacts from the perspective of geological and human significance. Provides a basic background into earth-science processes. LEC
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Basic description of oceanography: description and discussion of the ocean as a dynamic system. Relationships between and dependence upon the interactions of submarine topography, water chemistry, wave action, and biota in understanding the ocean system. Review of part that humanity plays in perturbing the natural oceanic environment. Discussions of estuarine problems as related to the sea, cultural activities, and rivers. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. Prerequisite: An introductory science course. LEC
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An introductory course dealing with the implications of geologic processes and materials for civilization. Topics to be considered include: geologic hazards such as floods, landslides, earthquakes, and volcanism; the availability of water, mineral, and energy resources; and the environmental impact of resource utilization. The importance of recognizing geologic constraints in land use planning and engineering projects is emphasized and illustrated by examples. LEC
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Introduction to information technology and the computer as a general tool processing information. Topics include internet tools (including browsers, search engines and web page construction), networking, computer organization, algorithms, programming languages, data representation and manipulation, binary numbers and Boolean logic, system and application software (including word processors, spreadsheets and presentation software), operating systems, databases, artificial intelligence, social and ethical issues in computing, information security, and mobile computing. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104 or eligibility to enroll in MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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Algorithm development, basic computer organization, syntax and semantics of a high-level programming language, including testing and debugging. Concept of structure in data and programs, arrays, top-down design, subroutines and library programs. Abstract data types. System concepts such as compilation and files. Nature and scope of computer science. Not open to students who have taken EECS 805. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or meeting the requirements to enroll in MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An introduction to the theoretical areas of computer science and their applications. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which computer science makes judgments and on what computers can and cannot accomplish. Among major topics covered are: how to read and to implement algorithms; what is memory and how much of it is required for various tasks; why computers cannot multiply; how finite-state machines compute; applications of finite-state machines to programming; recognizing languages; formal grammars. "Can machines think?" and other contemporary topics in the philosophy of computer science will be covered as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104. LEC
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Continuation of MATH 115 including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, and the calculus of functions of several variables. Not open to students with credit in MATH 122 or MATH 118. Prerequisite: MATH 115, plus a course in trigonometry, or MATH 121. MATH 103 may be taken concurrently. LEC
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Continuation of MATH 121, emphasis on applications. Introduction to partial differentiation and multiple integration. Open only for three hours credit to students with credit in both MATH 121 and MATH 116. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 116. LEC
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Transcendental functions, methods of integration, parametric equations, vector algebra and its applications to analytic geometry. Introduction to partial derivatives and multiple integration. Prerequisite: MATH 121, or equivalent, and invitation of the Department of Mathematics. LEC
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A first course in statistics for students with the techniques of calculus at their disposal. The following topics are studied with illustrations and problems drawn from various fields of applications: basic notions of probability and probability distributions; classical estimation and testing procedures for one and two sample problems; chi-square test. Not open to those with credit in MATH 628 or DSCI 301. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 116. LEC
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The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Concurrent enrollment in ASTR 196 suggested, but not required. Prerequisite: One year each of high school algebra and geometry. LEC
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An honors, calculus-based introduction to astronomy and astrophysics, required for astronomy majors. Components of the Universe - from planetary systems, stellar systems, large scale structure and cosmology - are examined to illuminate the physics principles which govern their evolution. Not open to students with prior credit in ASTR 191 or ASTR 291. Prerequisite: MATH 121, and either permission of instructor, or participation in the University Honors Program. LEC
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This course is a non-laboratory version of CHEM 125 and is a general treatment of basic concepts of general and organic chemistry as well as the role and significance of chemistry in the modern world. It is designed to fulfill the science requirement for non-science students, and should not be taken by students whose major requires a laboratory course in chemistry or more than one semester of chemistry. Meets with CHEM 125 for three lecture periods per week, with optional discussion sessions. LEC
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A general treatment of the basic concepts of general and organic chemistry as well as the role and significance of chemistry in the modern world. The course is designed to fulfill the science requirement for non-science majors, and should not be taken by students who require more than one semester of chemistry. Students in the School of Engineering may not take this course for credit. Three class periods, one three-hour laboratory, and optional discussion sessions. CHEM 125 and CHEM 150 cannot both be taken for credit. LEC
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This course seeks to develop a working knowledge of the conceptual foundation and the quantitative chemical relationships on which subsequent chemistry courses are built. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, properties of gases, liquids, and solids, acid-base chemistry, and chemical equilibria are emphasized. The class meets each week for three one-hour lectures, a one-hour tutorial period, and a three-hour laboratory. Students with credit in CHEM 125 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Must be eligible for MATH 115. LEC
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A course designed for qualified and motivated students with a strong interest in chemistry to provide a more thorough treatment of the concepts and topics of general chemistry. It is anticipated that students in CHEM 185 have had chemistry at the high-school level and plan to take more than one year of chemistry at the college level. Class meets each week for three one-hour lectures, a one-hour tutorial period, and a three-hour lab. Students with credit in CHEM 125 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for CHEM 184, a satisfactory score on a qualifying examination administered by the Department of Chemistry, and at least one of the following: (a) acceptance into the KU Honors Program, (b) an AP score in chemistry of 3 or higher, (c) a mathematics ACT score of 28 or higher. LEC
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A one-semester survey of classical and modern physics, designed primarily for liberal arts students. Typical subjects include the laws of motion, gravity, electricity and magnetism, sound, light, quantum mechanics, atomic and subatomic physics. Subjects are treated mainly conceptually with some use of basic data. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 104. LEC
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Principles and applications of mechanics, fluids, heat, thermodynamics, and sound waves. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. This course emphasizes the development of quantitative concepts and problem solving skills for students needing a broad background in physics as part of their preparation in other major programs, and for those who wish to meet the laboratory science requirement of the College. In special circumstances, permission to enroll in less than four hours may be obtained from the department. Not open to students with credit in PHSX 211 or PHSX 212. Prerequisite: MATH 104, or three and one-half years of college-preparatory mathematics including trigonometry and a score of 25 or higher on ACT mathematics. LEC
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Introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Designed for students in engineering and physical science majors. In special circumstances, permission to enroll for fewer than four hours credit may be obtained from the department. Students with credit in PHSX 114 can obtain only one hour of credit. Prerequisite: MATH 116 or MATH 121; courses in high school physics and/or chemistry are recommended. LEC
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An honors section of PHSX 211. Credit for fewer than four hours requires permission of the department. Recommended for students with a strong math background who are either in the University Honors Program or intending to major in a physical science. Courses in high school physics and chemistry are strongly recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 121 and permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the study of Islam and the Arabic language in relation to Islamic cultures in Africa, the Mediterranean region, and beyond. Topics covered include the historical origins of Islam in relation to the Arabic language and its cultures of origin. This course is interdisciplinary, including attention to the topic from the perspectives of historical unfolding of both the language and religion, geographic and cultural perspectives, political and economic concerns, and aesthetic perspectives, including literature and the arts. LEC
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An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of African cultures and societies focusing on contemporary life on the continent. Topics to be covered include the geography, history, politics, and economics of the continent, as well as the religion, languages and literatures, music, and the arts. The interdisciplinary perspective will provide students with a sound basis for understanding contemporary African societies. LEC
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Interdisciplinary introduction to the basic concepts and literature in the disciplines covered in African American Studies. Includes the social sciences, and humanities (including history, religion, and literature) as well as conceptual framework for investigation and analysis of Black history and culture and society. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as SOC 110.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 110 or SOC 110. (Same as SOC 112.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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Lecture and discussion sections covering the four primary fields of Anthropology: Biological Anthropology, Linguistics, Social Anthropology, and Archaeology. Concepts and approaches to each field, using past and present examples from around the world, will be examined with an emphasis on the unity of the anthropological approach. Future directions of human experience are explored. Discussion sections will be used to examine material covered in lecture and in readings in specific cultural and evolutionary contexts. Discussion and application of fundamental concepts to contemporary events, examination of fossil collections, and viewing and discussion of relevant visual materials are among topics to be covered in sections. LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as LING 106.) LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as LING 107.) LEC
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An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, and themes of cultural anthropology. The variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of cultural complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 108 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, themes of cultural anthropology, and the variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of culture complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 108 or ANTH 109. LEC
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Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as LING 320.) LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as LING 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Anthropological approaches to racial, ethnic, religious, and localized communities in contemporary U.S. Surveys major theories from social science, considers case studies of immigrant indigenous peoples from historical and contemporary, local, national, and international perspectives, and addresses questions concerning the sources, conditioners, and consequences of in-group and out-group identities. Prerequisite: Introductory cultural anthropology and one cultural course numbered 300 or above, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. Graduate version of ANTH 461 with more advanced requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a foundation for the study of communication in organizational contexts. It introduces students to various organization theories including classical, human relations, systems, and cultural approaches and examines the role of communication in each. Information flow, communication climate, communication networks, work relationships and managerial communication are discussed as well as organizational symbolism, conflict resolution, rituals and ethics. The course is designed to heighten students' awareness of the role of communication in the organizing process and to develop their abilities to diagnose and prevent communication-related problems. Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
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An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as GEOG 150.) LEC
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An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. LEC
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An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. Open only to students in the College Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the relationships between humans and their environments. The course introduces students to basic concepts in human geography relating to economic activities, landscapes, languages, migrations, nations, regions, and religions. Serves as the basis for further course work in cultural, economic, political, population, and urban geography. LEC
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An introduction to how human societies organize space and modify the world about them. Resultant patterns on the landscape are interpreted through principles of space perception, cultural ecology, diffusion, land use, and location theory. Comparisons are made between urban and rural areas and between subsistence and commercial societies. Open to students who have been accepted into the College Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as EVRN 150.) LEC
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A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in Latin America which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. LEC
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This course explores the variety of ways in which American Jews create Jewish identities as individuals and groups. It traces the emergence of the various current divisions within Judaism: Reform Judaism (which by definition, implies Orthodoxy), then Conservative Judaism, and then the later development of Reconstructionist Judaism. The course also explores other contemporary options for being Jewish: cultural Jews, secular Jews, unaffiliated Jews, religious Jews, and gay or lesbian or transgendered Jews. LEC
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An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as ANTH 106). LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as ANTH 107.) LEC
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Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as ANTH 320.) LEC
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An honors section of LING 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as ANTH 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A multidisciplinary introduction to the former communist states of Russia, the western Newly Independent States, Central Europe, and the Balkans. The course addresses the geography and history of the region, as well as the cultures of its peoples, as presented in literature, film, and music. Special attention is devoted to the current political, economic, and social situations, as they are reflected by the transition from communism and the rise of nationalism. LEC
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A multidisciplinary introduction to the former communist states of Russia, the western Newly Independent States, Central Europe, and the Balkans. The course addresses the geography and history of the region, as well as the cultures of its peoples, as presented in literature, film, and music. Special attention is devoted to the current political, economic, and social situations, as they are affected by the transition from communism and the rise of nationalism. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 304. LEC
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The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings. Open only to students on dean's honor roll or enrolled in Honors Program, or consent of instructor. May not be taken by those who also have credit for SOC 304. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as AMS 110.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 110 or SOC 110. (Same as AMS 112.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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The social structure and organization of American society with special reference to long-term and recent social changes. Not open to students who have credit for AMS 330 or SOC 330. Open to College honors students, students on the dean's honor roll, and by permission of the department. LEC
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Analysis of the family as a social institution primarily in the U.S. context. Topics considered are: current and historical changes in how the family is constituted, contrasting sociological theories of family relationships, sexuality in relation to family life, the coexistence of love and hate in families, family dissolution and reformation, and the care of children. A key theme is diversity: social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and age. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 308 or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to sociological concepts, methods, and substantive findings more intensive than that provided in SOC 104. Students may take this course in lieu of SOC 104 to satisfy requirements for the major and the minor. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 104. LEC
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Analysis of the family as a social institution primarily in the U.S. context. Topics considered are: current and historical changes in how the family is constituted, contrasting sociological theories of family relationships, sexuality in relation to family life, the coexistence of love and hate in families, family dissolution and reformation, and the care of children. A key theme is diversity: social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and age. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 220. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 220 or its equivalent. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of women. Topics may include gender ideologies and views of women, social roles, education, the family, economics, and politics. The major ideas and leaders of feminist movements and theories may also be considered. Topics will be approached from the perspective of both the social sciences and humanities and will include some comparison with non-Western and past cultures. LEC
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Similar to content to WGSS 201. An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of women and gender. Topics may include gender ideologies and views of women, social roles, education, the family, economics, and politics. The major ideas and leaders of feminist movements and theories may also be considered. Topics will be approached from the perspectives of both the social sciences and humanities and will include some comparison with non-western and past cultures. Open only to students in the Honors Program or by consent of the instructor. LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. (Formerly HDFL 150.) LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. (Formerly HDFL 151.) LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 310.) LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 311.) Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to modern economics designed primarily for students who do not plan to major in economics. Topics include economic history, the operation of economic institutions, and the formation and execution of economics policies to meet the current problems of the do domestic and international economy. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An introduction to modern economics designed primarily for students who do not plan to major in economics. Topics include economic history, the operation of economic institutions, and the formation and execution of economic policies to meet the current problems of the domestic and international economy. Prerequisite: Consent of the Economics Department and MATH 101 or MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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The course emphasizes the application of economic methods of analysis to the public policy issues that globalization creates. Topics covered may include the following: winners and losers from trade; links between trade and labor markets; links between trade and foreign investment; the international financial system and exchange rates; outsourcing and multinational corporations; international institutions and regional trade agreements. LEC
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An analytical introduction to microeconomics. Topics include theory of markets, public policy, international trade, economic efficiency, and equity. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An honors section of ECON 142. An analytical introduction to microeconomics. Topics include theory of markets, public policy, international trade, economic efficiency, and equity. Prerequisite: Consent of the Economics Department and MATH 101 or MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An analytical introduction to macroeconomics. Topics include determination of aggregate income, employment, inflation, exchange rates, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in dealing with unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Prerequisite: MATH 101, MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An honors section of ECON 144. An analytical introduction to macroeconomics. Topics include determination of aggregate income, employment, inflation, exchange rates, and the role of fiscal and monetary policy in dealing with unemployment, inflation, and economic growth. Prerequisite: Consent of the Economics Department and MATH 101, MATH 104, or eligibility for MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An introduction to basic American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the comparative study of political systems emphasizing governmental structures, parties, electoral techniques, and recent trends in the field. The course also considers major differences between (1) representative and autocratic systems, and (2) developed and underdeveloped nations. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the nation-state system including the role of nationalism, sovereignty, and power. Patterns of state action including neutralism, collective security, war, and cooperation through international organizations are stressed. Specific examples of contemporary international problems are also analyzed and discussed. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to explore competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. The course critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of these problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. May not be taken by anyone who has already completed SOC 306 or its equivalent. LEC
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Explores competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. Critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of these problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 160 or SOC 306. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to explore competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. The course critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of theses problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 160. May not be taken by anyone who has already completed SOC 160 or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the field of social welfare and its relationship to the social work profession, charged with carrying out its primary missions. Specific social welfare policies will be analyzed, particularly as those policies affect individuals and families in need. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. LEC
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This course introduces students to the principles of scientific inquiry in applied behavioral science: objectivity, definitions, observation, reliability, validity, correlation and its limitations, causation, experimental design and analysis, and the interpretation of data. These principles are presented in the context of solving individual and societal problems across the life span, for example, in early childhood education, public health, developmental disabilities (e.g., autism), delinquency, independent living for people with disabilities, educational systems, and gerontology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to rationales, methods, and findings resulting from the empirical study of human behavior. Readings, lectures, videos, and classroom demonstrations are used to illustrate various principles of behavior and techniques of application. These principles are organized into a general theory of human conduct that is contrasted with alternative explanations of human behavior. Students learn basic principles of scientific method and their implications for behavioral science and human affairs. (Formerly HDFL 140.) LEC
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An introduction to child behavior and development with an emphasis on the normal developmental range of growth, intelligence, cognition, emotion, language, and social skills from birth to adolescence. (Formerly HDFL 160.) LEC
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Examines basic theoretical perspectives and research on verbal and nonverbal communication elements affecting communication between individuals in a variety of contexts. Topics include communication competence, developmental aspects of interpersonal communication, and interpersonal influence. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language. LEC
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A basic introduction to the science of psychology. LEC
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Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC
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An introductory survey of personality theories, development, assessment and current research. LEC
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Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention is paid to the influence of factors like language, culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. May not be taken by anyone who has completed SOC 305 or its equivalent. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention will be paid to the influence of factors like language and culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 305. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention is paid to the influence of factors like language, culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 150. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 150 or its equivalent. LEC
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Provides a general understanding of normal and deviant speech, language, and hearing in adults and children. This course considers the normal development of communication behavior, the nature of communication disorders, and the interaction of speech pathology and audiology with allied fields (e.g., education, medicine, psychology, special education). LEC
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Study of language acquisition in children, including phonologic, morphologic, syntactic, and semantic components. Methods of language measurement, the role of comprehension, and pragmatic aspects of language use are included. May be taught in lecture or online format. LEC
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