Print...

Approved non-Western culture courses

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

There are 272 results.

An introduction to important historical developments in Africa, mainly south of the Sahara. Topics will include pre-history, empires, kingdoms and city-states, the slave trade, southern Africa, partition and colonialism, the independence era, military and civilian governments, and liberation movements. Approaches will include literature, the visual arts, politics, economics, and geography. (Same as HIST 104.) LEC
View current sections...
An intensive version of AAAS 105. Open only to students on Dean's Honor Roll or enrolled in Honors Program, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course treats West African history through the first part of the twentieth century. The student is provided with a perspective on the major historical patterns that gave rise to West Africa's development as an integral part of world history. Special attention is paid to anthropological, geographical, and technological developments that influenced West African political and socioeconomic changes. (Same as HIST 160.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of African traditional religious beliefs, systems and practices and how these have conditioned spiritual, moral and social values, attitudes, social relationships and institutions, art, literature and music. Topics covered include the African world-view, concepts of birth, life, marriage, death and reincarnation; the concurrent practice or monotheism, polytheism and the cult of the ancestors; and the extent of relevance to Black societies in the New World. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 106 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Case study of Third-World problems and aspirations through the first Black nation to win independence from colonialism. Topics include: profile of the Third World; Caribbean diversity; the Columbian exchange; piracy; slavery and plantocracy; Revolution and the burden of freedom; U.S. occupation; Papa Doc, Baby Doc, and the Tontons Macoute; Liberation theology; peasant life; government and corruption; poverty and hunger; morality of foreign aid; Voodoo; folk medicine. No knowledge of Haitian or French required. Students may not receive credit for both HAIT 200 and AAAS 301. LEC
View current sections...
Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as HAIT 300.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as ANTH 303.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. (Same as HIST 300.) LEC
View current sections...
An intensive version of AAAS 305. A survey of social, political and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. (Same as HIST 307.) LEC
View current sections...
Lecture and discussion course in African area of current interest. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: AAAS 103 or AAAS 105 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Sahara Africa. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. (Same as ENGL 326.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and one 200-level English course or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. There will be an end of semester "studio performance." (Same as DANC 230 and THR 226.) LEC
View current sections...
This course deals with the literatures of the southern Africa region, including works by both women and men from South Africa, Botswana, Lesotho, Zaire, Zimbabwe, and Mauritius. Course includes close attention to the political and cultural bases of social conflict in the region. LEC
View current sections...
Reading, analysis and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from Africa. Brief attention is paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or with consent of instructor. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 332. LEC
View current sections...
A critical study of issues and questions raised about women in contemporary African literature and implications for the larger society through the analysis of theme, language, characterization, roles and functions of women in selected works. (Same as WGSS 330.) LEC
View current sections...
AAAS 349: Islam (3) NW / H / W
Islam's Origins, the prophet Muhammed, the Holy Koran, religious symbols and moral mandates, and historical developments. (Same as REL 350.) LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to historical, cultural, social, political, and economic issues in Africa from a geographic perspective. The course begins with the historical geography of humanity in Africa, from ancient times through to the present. Other topics include cultural dynamics, demography, health, rural development, urbanization, gender issues, and political geography. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa will be used to illustrate major themes. (Same as GEOG 351.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the origin and development of continental African theatre and its affinity to the Levant. Traditional, colonial and contemporary dramatic theories and experiments will be examined in play selections. (Same as THR 326.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the indigenous languages of Africa from a linguistic perspective, covering the main language families and their geographic distribution, and focusing on the features and structure of the more widely spoken and representative languages in each family (e.g., Fula, Hausa, Maninka, Swahili, Yoruba). (Same as LING 370.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as ANTH 372.) LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the pre-historic cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. (Same as HA 376.) LEC
View current sections...
The course develops an understanding of the postcolonial concept and its different manifestations in theatre and drama across nations and cultures. It approaches postcolonialism as a way of reading theatre, and as a genre within theatre by exploring how the "colonial project" has reconfigured the concept, content, and context of theatre in both colonized and colonizing cultures. In addition to the study of postcolonial playwrights and their works, the course is also an introduction to postcolonial theory and its critics. (Same as THR 429.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is an introduction to 20th century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as FREN 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC
View current sections...
This course focuses on literature that reflects Islamic culture from its inception to contemporary times. Beginning with attention to the importance of the spoken word in the establishment of Islam, course readings and lectures follow the place of literary works in confirming Islamic perspectives. Readings include selections from the Qur'an, classical works of poetry and narrative, and contemporary autobiography. Authors are from Africa and the region of the Golden Age of Islam, including the best known: al-Ghazali (d.1111 C.E.), Attar (d. circa 1193-1235), Ibn Arabi (d. 1240 C.E,), Rumi (d. 1273), Saadi (d.1291), Hafiz (d. 1389 C.E.), and Shah (contemporary), as well as readings by and about less well known Muslim women scholars and Sufis in all historical periods. Readings are all in English translations. LEC
View current sections...
This course focuses on four decades of African women's writing from all regions of the continent. Works included deal with a wide variety of issues relevant to African women, as well as universal issues of conceptions of gender roles, and the struggle to attain personal rights and freedom within traditional cultural frameworks. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the realities of Muslim women's experiences as conveyed in their own voices. Works are drawn from all over the world, from Africa and the Middle East to Europe and the U.S. and cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. LEC
View current sections...
The intention of this course is to present a comprehensive portrait and a deeper understanding of the Arab society and its cultural background. We will focus on the debate that is still raging about traditionalism versus modernity, and authenticity (assala) and specificity (Khususiyya) versus westernization. Moreover, we will discuss the question of Arab identity which manifests itself through a sense of belonging and diversity of affiliations, and relies as well on shared culture and its variations, and shared place in history and common experiences. It is designed for any student interested in this ethnic group. LEC
View current sections...
A study of pop songs, television, comics, and other idioms of popular culture from different parts of the Muslim world, with attention to Muslims' sense of humor, tragedy, aesthetics, and pertinent issues of the day. (Same as REL 450.) LEC
View current sections...
Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning, writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. (Same as LING 470.) Prerequisite: AAAS 103, AAAS 305, or LING 106; or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. (Same as AMS 534 and SOC 534.) LEC
View current sections...
Upper level lecture and discussion courses in African area of current interest and/or taking advantage of faculty resources in topics relevant to the major. May be repeated for credit toward the major. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior in good standing. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the history and institutions of Islam in Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of Islam on African traditional religions and African civilizations in general; the historiographical traditions of Islam in Africa. (Same as REL 535.) Prerequisite: Five hours of distribution courses in the humanities. LEC
View current sections...
The course examines the links between language structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. (Same as LING 543.) LEC
View current sections...
This course seeks to unveil a complex cultural practice that has been misconstructed by many scholars. It explores the versatility of the meaning of the veil. It examines the ways in which the veil has become a symbol of privacy, cultural identity, religious assertion, resistance and liberation, besides being a symbol of constraint, oppression, backwardness, and sexual mystery. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. (Same as REL 552.) LEC
View current sections...
Acquaints students with the values and social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. (Same as GEOG 553.) LEC
View current sections...
A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as FMS 544.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior course work in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as HIST 561 and POLS 561.) LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the arts and cultures of Central Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Equatorial forest and the Southern Savanna regions of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, Zaire, and Angola. The historical and cultural contexts for the visual arts associated with centralized leadership and non-centralized societies are explored. (Same as HA 578.) LEC
View current sections...
An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as HIST 598.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. (Same as POLS 665.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 305 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of developments in Sufi (Islamic Mystical) thought, poetry, and ritual throughout Muslim history and across the Muslim world. (Same as REL 650.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of the relationship between Islam, and gender roles and status in religious texts (Quran and Hadith) and in societies across the Muslim world, past and present. (Same as REL 657.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to : 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as ANTH 663.) LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the archaeological cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. This course requires more intensive work than AAAS 376 and is open to upper division and graduate students only. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 376/HA 376. (Same as HA 676.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of sub-Saharan African media, emphasizing textiles, ceramics, metal and bead work, the artist's techniques, working methods and apprenticeship, and historical and contemporary cultural contexts, including the influence of tourism and the international art market on artistic production and style. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as HA 677.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An in-depth examination of an artistic tradition shared by a number of African cultures. Discussion includes historical development related to style, use and meaning and other relevant issues. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as HA 679.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. (Same as AAAS 510 and SOC 534.) LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360. LEC
View current sections...
Violent change, revolution, planned change, and peaceful transition in non-Western cultures. A study of development, modernization, nation-building, rapid acculturation, and war. LEC
View current sections...
An honors section of ANTH 160 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 160 or ANTH 360. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy which are better known to the Western world. (Same as EALC 130.) LEC
View current sections...
This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as AAAS 303.) LEC
View current sections...
A more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160. LEC
View current sections...
A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 161. Not open to students who have had ANTH 161. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Emphasis on cultural-historical relationships and theories of cultural development and change. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as EALC 364.) LEC
View current sections...
Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as EALC 365.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the Japanese people from birth to death: what it means to be born in a Japanese family, to grow up Japanese, and to die Japanese. Anthropological works and selections from Japanese literature and film will be used to examine ways in which Japanese people live through the critical periods in their life cycle. (Same as EALC 366.) LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as EALC 368.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the native cultures of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Investigation of the origins and dispersal of Pacific peoples, their cultural adaptations to differing habitats, their forms of social, political, and religious organization. Consideration of the problems and cultural changes resulting from colonization and modernization. Prerequisite: ANTH 100, ANTH 108, ANTH 160, ANTH 308, ANTH 360, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as AAAS 372.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of American Indian cultures north of Mexico at the time of the first contact with Western civilization; detailed studies of selected Indian cultures. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as LAA 334.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of native peoples and cultures of South America from the time of initial Western contacts to the present day. LEC
View current sections...
This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Javanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as WGSS 389.) LEC
View current sections...
A comparative study of religion and systems of value and belief in non-Western cultures. LEC
View current sections...
An archaeological survey of the Precolombian heritage of Mexico and Central America. The sites and cultures of the Olmecs, Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Zapotecs, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs will be considered in detail. Investigations of ancient art and architecture, crafts and technologies, trade and exchange, religious beliefs and practices, and writing and calendrical systems will be directed toward understanding the growth and the decline of these Native American civilizations. LEC
View current sections...
An archaeological survey of the ancient peoples of Peru and neighboring countries in South America. The origins of complex societies on the coast and in the Andean highlands will be reviewed with special consideration of the role of "vertical" environments in the development of Andean social and economic systems. Cultures such as Chavin, Moche, Nazca, Huari, Tiahuanaco, Chimu, and the rise of the imperial Inca state will be examined through artifacts, architectural remains, and ethnohistoric documents. LEC
View current sections...
Consideration of the history and processes of cultural development from the evidence of humans' first presence to the historic period in the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Special attention will be devoted to the origins, changes within, and connections to modern Southwestern native peoples of three long-lived traditions known as Hohokam, Mogollon, and Anasazi. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
View current sections...
"Peoples of Africa" examines the anthropology of Sub-Saharan Africa through selected case studies of particular societies and issues that have wider comparative relevance. Normally two to four societies are selected for the semester and studied through ethnographic, historical, and literary monographs. These case studies are examined in their pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial histories. Lectures, readings, and exercises emphasize three kinds of reasoning -- geographical, historical, and cultural context -- required to grasp events and issues in unfamiliar societies. The course also features major anthropological ideas that emerged in the study of African society, and tracks how anthropology has been adapted by African scholars, policy makers, and activists. LEC
View current sections...
The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and anthropological and other social science literature. These themes and images are studied in the contexts of both modern and traditional cultures. Although the popular deviates from the orthodox, nevertheless, the energy and pervasiveness of these bastard offspring enforce and sustain "proper" cultural values. As a result of exploration of both highways and backroads of cultural expression, a holistic picture of Japanese ethos will emerge. (Same as EALC 565.) LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of deeply rooted Japanese beliefs about intimate relationships among humans, animals, and nature - beliefs which help to explain the mysterious and to lend order to the world. Anthropological works, selections from Japanese literature, historical documents, artworks, and films will be used to examine supernatural themes. (Same as EALC 567.) LEC
View current sections...
An anthropological and historical examination of the processes and dynamics of the colonial experience. Cross-cultural psychosocial phenomena that have profoundly affected the values and social organizations of both colonizers and colonized will be emphasized. Specific examples will be chosen from the former American, Japanese, and European colonial empires with emphasis on Asia. LEC
View current sections...
This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to: 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as AAAS 663.) LEC
View current sections...
Readings and interpretation of varied modern Chinese texts. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary will be supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. (Same as AAAS 334 and THR 226.) LEC
View current sections...
Classical East Indian dance has an extensive movement vocabulary that emphasizes the coordination of rhythmic foot patterns with intricate hand gestures. Students will learn the mudras (hand gestures) and their significance and integration within each dance. Readings will include excerpts from the Natya Sastra and other treatises of East Indian dance and culture. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy which are better known to the Western world. (Same as ANTH 293.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy that are better known to the Western world. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of the cultural heritage of Japan from earliest times to Meiji Restoration. Emphasis will be placed upon Japan's literary tradition. Not open to students with credit in EALC 512. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to modern Asia (19th-20th centuries) through the reading of autobiographies by men and women of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, and Vietnam. Combination of lecture and discussion format. LEC
View current sections...
Topics are various aspects of Chinese and Japanese cultures. LEC
View current sections...
This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of China and the contiguous regions of Inner Asia and Tibet. Course materials include translations and discussions of oral tales, epics, poetry, novels, and biography, which explore the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC
View current sections...
A wide-ranging examination of the similarities and difference between Japanese and Korean culture through folklore, literature, film, and other texts. Format: Lecture and discussion. Designed for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC
View current sections...
This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, the course introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, race, class, ethnic and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 315.) LEC
View current sections...
An examination of Chinese culture from earliest times to the modern period. Emphasis will be placed upon China's literary tradition. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An exploration of the Japanese way of life, self-concepts, and world view through lecture, discussion, reading, and field trips to businesses, community organizations, and cultural sites. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as ANTH 364.) LEC
View current sections...
Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as ANTH 365.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the Japanese people from birth to death: what it means to be born in a Japanese family, to grow up Japanese, and to die Japanese. Anthropological works and selections from Japanese literature and film will be used to examine ways in which Japanese people live through the critical periods in their life cycle. (Same as ANTH 366.) LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as ANTH 368.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the contemporary popular cultures of Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan, with particular emphasis on relations between East Asia and North America. Students study the issue of globalization and how the transnational flow of commodities and culture affects local societies and individual identities. They learn to identify, describe, and analyze the cross-cultural content of popular cultural artifacts and modes of expression relating to East Asia. To this end, they explore in detail such subjects as: fashion, foodways, cinema, manga, soap operas, and punk rock. Not open to students who have taken EALC 580. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the phenomenon and manifestations of play in Japanese culture. Topics include but are not confined to: the philosophy of play, the semiotics of play, the places of play, the role of laughter, play in Japanese religion, simulation and performance, and play and competition. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the phenomenon and manifestations of play in Japanese culture. Topics include but are not confined to: the philosophy of play, the semiotics of play, the places of play, the role of laughter, play in Japanese religion, simulation and performance, and play and competition. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of ancient Chinese culture to the Qin period. Major archaeological discoveries and the literary tradition are taken as the primary evidence through which a number of topics are introduced (for example: environment, food, writing, art, thought, ritual). A knowledge of Chinese is not required. The course is offered at the 400 and 600 levels, with additional assignments at the 600 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 615. LEC
View current sections...
This course uses myth, literature, history, biography, and other documents to discuss sexual politics in China from ca 1500 B.C.E. to the end of the last dynasty in 1911. Topics include: emperors, empresses, and consorts, polygamy, prostitution, love, yin and yang cosmology, the art of the bedchamber, women's literature, and erotic literature. Recommended: A course in East Asian studies. Not open to students who have taken EALC 618. LEC
View current sections...
Daily life and issues of social and cultural interaction between China and Western nations from the Opium War to the present. Fiction, travel diary, historical sources, film, and personal accounts will make up course materials. LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in China from the Shang to the People's Republic. (Same as REL 508.) LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in Japan from the Jomon period to the present. (Same as REL 509.) LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of the relationship between education and Japanese national and cultural identity as expressed in conceptions of childhood: philosophical and political positions underlying curricular and administrative policies, teachers' training, and pedagogical styles; the interface between education, "work," and the economy in general; and the theme of "internationalization," (kokusaika). The course is taught in English. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as HIST 640.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of traditional and modern theatre and performance in Asia, with greatest attention given to India, China, and Japan. A study of plays, dramatic genres, history, conventions of play production, and acting styles and other performance forms. (Same as THR 527). LEC
View current sections...
An examination of Chinese culture from earliest times to the modern period. Emphasis will be placed upon China's literary tradition. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of the major intellectual and aesthetic trends in Japanese history. The course is designed to give teachers and professionals, as well as students with a general interest in Japan, an overview of its unique cultural tradition. Not open to students with credit in EALC 136. LEC
View current sections...
Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the 12 impact of key cultural, economic, and political issues on each film industry. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as FMS 541.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC
View current sections...
Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 543.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC
View current sections...
A reading and media-rich survey of institutional, ritual, literary, educational, and exegetical practices that have shaped the lives of Buddhists in China, past and present. Alterities within the Buddhist tradition, and interactions with other religious options, are considered. (Same as REL 555.) LEC
View current sections...
The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and anthropological and other social science literature. These themes and images are studied in the contexts of both modern and traditional cultures. Although the popular deviates from the orthodox, nevertheless, the energy and pervasiveness of these offspring enforce and sustain "proper" cultural values. As a result of exploration of both highways and backroads of cultural expression, a holistic picture of Japanese ethos will emerge. (Same as ANTH 565. ) LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of deeply rooted Japanese beliefs about intimate relationships among humans, animals, and nature - beliefs which help to explain the mysterious and to lend order to the world. Anthropological works, selections from Japanese literature, historical documents, artworks, and films will be used to examine supernatural themes. (Same as ANTH 567.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the contemporary popular cultures of Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan, with particular emphasis on relations between East Asia and North America. Students study the issue of globalization and how the transnational flow of commodities and culture affects local societies and individual identities. They learn to identify, describe, and analyze the cross-cultural content of popular cultural artifacts and modes of expression relating to East Asia. To this end, they explore in detail such subjects as: fashion, foodways, cinema, manga, soap operas, and punk rock. More extensive writing requirements than 380. Not open to students who have taken EALC 380. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as HIST 583.) LEC
View current sections...
An intensive survey of China's history from the early 19th century to the present. Key topics include the decline of the traditional system, the rise of communism, the Maoist era, and the tensions of change and control in the 1980s and 1990s. (Same as HIST 584.) LEC
View current sections...
Examines the epochal changes that have occurred in China from Deng Xiaoping's rise to power in 1978 to the present. Includes a focus on the historical background of the revolutionary period before examining the political and economic changes that spawned the 1989 "prodemocracy" movement at Tiananmen. The course includes an analysis of the events of the 1990s focusing on U.S.-China political and economic relations and the destabilizing effects of inflation, infrastructural reform, political and economic decentralization, and leadership succession. A previous course on China is helpful, but not mandatory. (Same as POLS 668.) LEC
View current sections...
Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as HIST 587.) LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as HIST 588.) LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as HIST 589.) LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as HIST 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the Yakuza, and political activists. (Same as HIST 596.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). (Same as HIST 597.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of ancient Chinese culture to the Qin period. Major archaeological discoveries and the literary tradition will be taken as the primary evidence through which a number of topics are introduced (for example: environment, food, writing, art, thought, ritual). A knowledge of Chinese is not required. The course is offered at the 400 and 600 levels, with additional assignments at the 600 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 415. LEC
View current sections...
This course uses myth, literature, history, biography, and other documents to discuss sexual politics in China from ca 1500 B.C.E. to the end of the last dynasty in 1911. Topics include: emperors, empresses, and consorts, polygamy, prostitution, love, yin and yang cosmology, the art of the bedchamber, women's literature, and erotic literature. More extensive writing requirement than 418. Recommended: A course in East Asian studies. Not open to students who have taken EALC 418. LEC
View current sections...
Daily life and issues of social and cultural interaction between China and Western nations from the Opium War to the present. Fiction, travel diary, historical sources, film, and personal accounts will make up course materials. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as HWC 524 and PHIL 506.) Prerequisite: Eastern civilizations course or a course in Asian history or a distribution course in philosophy. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the issues involved in doing business with China. The current Chinese political and economic context will be examined, followed by a study of the Chinese legal system and Chinese economic law and regulation. Relevant U.S. law will also be considered. Prerequisite: A course on China, or general background in law or business. LEC
View current sections...
A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes and ideas of China, Japan, and Korea. (Same as POLS 656.) Prerequisite: A distribution course in political science or a course in East Asian studies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. (Same as GINS 305.) LEC
View current sections...
Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Saharan Africa. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. (Same as AAAS 332.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and one 200-level English course or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The study of a wide range of American Indian literature, from various tribes and in a variety of genres. Satisfies the non-western culture course requirement. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
An advanced study of a topic, genre, or area of written and/or oral African literature. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of major works, as well as their cultural and historical contexts. The course also addresses central critical and theoretical debates in the field. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, Survey of Japanese Film introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, class, ethnic, and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 315.) LEC
View current sections...
Seminar on various national film cultures of East and Southeast Asia. Representative films are studied from formal, stylistic, and socio-historic perspectives. Addresses the impact of key cultural, economic, and political issues on each film industry. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as EALC 541.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC
View current sections...
Seminar on the major developments in the contemporary (1980-present) Japanese film industry examining how filmmaking practices and film criticism have been influenced by such issues as transnationalism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, postmodernism, and new media. We survey recent industrial and stylistic trends as well as key critical debates. Class discussion, reports, and individual research papers. The course is offered at the 500 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as EALC 543.) Prerequisite: Junior status. LEC
View current sections...
A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films are examined. (Same as AAAS 555.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is an introduction of 20th Century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as AAAS 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to historical, cultural, social, political, and economic issues in Africa from a geographic perspective. The course begins with the historical geography of humanity in Africa, from ancient times through to the present. Other topics include cultural dynamics, demography, health, rural development, urbanization, gender issues, and political geography. Case studies from Eastern and Southern Africa will be used to illustrate major themes. (Same as AAAS 351.) LEC
View current sections...
An appreciation of how China and the Chinese way of life has evolved. Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Communism are examined as the bases of Chinese culture values. These values are then set against a highly varied physical and economic landscape to show how an elaborate and complex society has come into being. Contemporary developments are discussed only as a part of the entire spectrum of Chinese history. No prerequisite required. LEC
View current sections...
Acquaints students with the values of social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. (Same as AAAS 553.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the culture and history of selected indigenous peoples of the Americas. Emphasis is placed on the environmental setting, the settlement and subsistence patterns, and the impact of European colonization. Discussion includes present-day ethnic and resource issues. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the study of Indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Applied Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from diverse cultures. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of American Indian life are interconnected and that tribal histories cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. Students are introduced to controversies over how to research, write, and interpret American Indians, and will address the foundations of Indigenous Studies, and that is Indigenous concepts of decolonization, empowerment and Nation-building. The course explores how the lives of Indigenous people have been affected by colonization, while exploring the varying definitions of "colonialism", "colonizer" and the "colonized." LEC
View current sections...
A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed GINS 331. (Same as REL 330.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed GINS 330. (Same as REL 331.) LEC
View current sections...
This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Nations Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines in order to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Recommended for juniors or seniors, or for students who have completed GINS 101/INS 101. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the roles of activist Indigenous women in politics, social work, academia, business, environmental and health issues. Compares and contrasts the ideology of the predominantly white feminist movement with the goals and concerns of the "Red Power" movement and emphasizes Indigenous socio-cultural values and concerns. Profiles prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers, in addition to topics of serious concern to Indigenous women: violence, racism, loss of culture and language, education, health care and other manifestations of continued colonization. LEC
View current sections...
This course investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. The class traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems and offers traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills are emphasized. Guest lectures from GINS faculty members, librarian, and members of the Writing Center serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Trains students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? Includes an overview of Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Explores the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. Examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. Focuses on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping, and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the Arts of Japan in historical and cultural context. Visual arts will be stressed. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the arts of China in historical and cultural context. Visual arts will be stressed. No prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the arts of Korea in historical and cultural context. Visual arts will be stressed. LEC
View current sections...
A history of Korean painting from the 4th through the 19th centuries. An examination of tomb murals, Buddhist painting, landscape, genre painting, portraiture, documentary painting, and decorative symbolic imagery. Lectures and discussion focus on artistic style and cultural context. Completion of HA 266, HA 269 or ECIV 104 is recommended. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the pre-historic cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. (Same as AAAS 376.) LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of HA 267, requiring additional readings and writing assignments. An introduction to the arts of Japan in historical and cultural context. Basic principles and problems of the visual arts are analyzed, as are the major historical trends and periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 267. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of HA 268, requiring additional readings and writing assignments. An introduction to the arts of China in historical and cultural context. Basic principles and problems of the visual arts are analyzed, as are the major historical trends and periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 268. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of HA 269, requiring additional readings and writing assignments. An introduction to the arts of Korea in historical and cultural context. Basic principles and problems of the visual arts are analyzed, as are the major historical trends and periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. Not open to freshmen or students with credit in HA 269. LEC
View current sections...
A survey covering the development of Japanese painting from the Kofun period down to the early twentieth century. Topics will include Buddhist and other religious paintings, narrative handscrolls, suibokuga, decorative screens, genre paintings and ukiyo-e prints, and western-style paintings of the Meiji and Taisho periods. Work requirements will be greater for students enrolled at the 700 level than at the 400 level. Prerequisite: HA 265, or HA 267, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the development of painting in China, beginning with the earliest forms of figural and landscape depiction. Emphasis will be placed on the major painting traditions of the Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties. Prerequisite: One of the following four courses: HA 150, HA 265, HA 266, or ECIV 104; and membership in the University Honors Program or permission of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the major artists and schools of the Japanese print, especially in their technical and stylistic developments and in their relation to the culture of Japan in the Edo period. Prerequisite: A survey of Asian or Japanese art, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of Chinese art from Neolithic times through the Han Dynasty (ca. 200 C.E.). Emphasis will be placed on recent archaeological excavations and also on the development of bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou Dynasties. Prerequisite: A college level introduction to Asian art history, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the arts and cultures of Central Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Equatorial Forest and the Southern Savanna regions of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, Zaire, and Angola. The historical and cultural contexts for the visual arts associated with centralized leadership and non-centralized societies are explored. (Same as AAAS 578.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the Buddhist arts (architecture, sculpture, and painting) of India, China, and Japan. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of Japanese sculpture from the Kofun period (300-700 C.E.) to the present day. Emphasis is placed on works of Buddhist sculpture from the 7th through the 13th centuries. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Asian art history or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Consideration of Japanese artistic responses to visual culture from Europe and the United States. The course focuses upon Japanese art from the 16th century to the present. Prerequisite: A college-level introduction to Asian art history or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the rich visual art traditions of West Africa. Emphasis is given to the major art-producing cultures of the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast, including the archaeological cultures of Nigeria, Mali, and Ghana. The diverse forms of figure sculptures and masquerade performance and the meanings of these arts in historical and cultural contexts are examined. Upper division and graduate students can enroll for this course with appropriate course requirements. Not open to students who have taken AAAS 376/HA 376. (Same as AAAS 676.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of sub-Saharan African media, emphasizing textiles, ceramics, metal and bead work, the artist's techniques, working methods and apprenticeship, and historical and contemporary cultural contexts, including the influence of tourism and the international art market on artistic production and style. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as AAAS 677.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An in-depth examination of an artistic tradition shared by a number of African cultures. Discussion includes historical development related to style, use and meaning and other relevant issues critical to the topic. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. (Same as AAAS 679.) Prerequisite: AAAS 376 or HA 376, or AAAS 578 or HA 578, or an introductory course in art history at the college level, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as AAAS 302.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to important historical developments in Africa mainly south of the Sahara. Topics will include early history, empires, kingdoms, and city-states, the slave trade, southern Africa, partition and colonialism, the independence era, military and civilian governments, and liberation movements. Approaches will include literature, the visual arts, politics, economics, and geography. (Same as AAAS 105.) LEC
View current sections...
A general survey of the political, social, and economic developments of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Asia Minor, and Greece from Paleolithic times to 323 B.C. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Not open to students with credit in upper division East Asian history. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The principal focus is on the evolution and analysis of societies, economies, and religions of native American peoples, the impact of Spanish and Portuguese conquests and settlement, government, trade and culture upon native civilizations, the influence of African population and culture, and the creole nature of the resulting society in the colonial period. Changes in the society and economy which presaged the movements for independence are also discussed. LEC
View current sections...
The principal focus is on the evolution and analysis of societies, economies, and religions of native American peoples, the impact of Spanish and Portuguese conquests and settlement, government, trade and culture upon native civilizations, the influence of African population and culture, and the creole nature of the resulting society in the colonial period. Changes in the society and economy which presaged the movements for independence are also discussed. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course treats West African history through the first part of the 20th century. The student is provided with a perspective on the major historical patterns that gave rise to West Africa's development as an integral part of world history. Special attention is paid to anthropological geographical, and technological developments that influenced West African political and socioeconomic changes. (Same as AAAS 160.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. (Same as AAAS 305.) LEC
View current sections...
An intensive version of HIST 300. A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. (Same as AAAS 307.) LEC
View current sections...
The societies, economies, and cultures of Native American peoples in Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and the Southwestern United States will provide the main focus of this course to understand the culture and values of those who preceded the Europeans in the Americas. European culture is also examined, including the motivations for exploration and conquest. The details of the particular conquests and how they affected the resulting composite society will also be discussed, using contemporary eye-witness accounts, films recreating the action, and modern accounts. LEC
View current sections...
This course surveys the history of the first peoples to inhabit North America from prehistory to present. Commonly and collectively referred to as American Indians, indigenous peoples include a diverse array of nations, chiefdoms, confederacies, tribes, and bands, each of which has its own unique cultures, economies, and experiences in dealing with colonial and neocolonial powers. This class seeks to demonstrate this diversity while at the same time providing an understanding of the common struggle for political and cultural sovereignty that all indigenous nations face. Indigenous nations that have developed a relationship with the United States will receive primary focus, but comparative reference will be made to First Nations of Canada. LEC
View current sections...
This course will study the structure and dynamics of colonialism and neo-colonialism in the third world beginning in the 19th Century and continuing to the 1980s. It will also examine responses to these systems, from small-scale resistance to nationalist revolutions. Attention will be given to the relationship between ideology and collective behavior. Case studies will be drawn from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces the history of major nomadic powers in Eurasian Steppe and their impact in the world from the first Millennium BCE to around 1500 AD. The main topics include the culture of the Scythians, the Hun and Xiongnu confederacy, the Mongol conquest, and the Turkish empires in Central and West Asia. It investigates the natural and human forces that shape the identities of the nomads and their changing images in history. LEC
View current sections...
This course on China's Communist revolution considers the evolution of Maoism, or Chinese Communism, from its ideological origins through its implementation during and after the Chinese Communist revolution. It examines major Maoist movements such as Land Reform, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the cult of Mao. It further considers the globalization of Maoism by examining examples of other Maoist revolutions and revolutionaries in places like Cambodia, Peru, and Nepal. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides a foundation for study of Japanese history. It combines lectures on the scope of Japanese history over the past 2,000 years with discussions of topics key to the development of Japanese civilization such as religion and literature. We analyze how different media, such as film, Japanese animation (anime), and art can be used as historical sources, and how these shape our understanding of Japan. Students hone their ability to analyze both thematic and historical questions through writing assignments and discussions. LEC
View current sections...
Japan's warrior class, the samurai, dominated politics and society for more than half of Japan's recorded history. This course traces the history of the samurai from their origins to the dissolution of their class in 1877, examining their military role, philosophy, and cultural contributions. It also considers continued references to the "spirit of the samurai" in the twentieth century. LEC
View current sections...
This course offers a comparative assessment of the origins and practice of various forms of popular culture in the 20th Century in these two regions. Theories that explain the links between modernism and popular culture are discussed. Topics investigated may include the impact of spectacle on the urban environment, the legacies of colonialism in the sphere of culture, and the intersection of public space and popular culture. Forms such as music, cinema, street theater, and sports are explored. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior course work in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and POLS 561.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the development and characteristics of the Middle East since Napoleon. Topics such as the significance of Islam, the impact of the West, and the effects of Russia's movement south are emphasized. In the 20th century the Arab/Israeli problem, the Persian Gulf, oil, and foreign policy interests are stressed. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive study of developments and changes in the Middle East since World War II. Themes developed include the end of British and French ascendancy, fundamental transformation of the structure of Middle Eastern states and politics, oil and the energy crisis, American and Russian policies and interests, old and new problems--e.g., the Straits, Suez Canal, Kurds, the Persian Gulf. (Not closed to those who have taken HIST 569, nor is HIST 569 necessary for HIST 570.) No prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
Course covers the history of Japan from the prehistoric era through the ancient period (approximately 10,000 BC to 1200 AD). Topics examined include the rise of Japanese Civilization, state formation, early capitals, belief systems, courtly culture in the Heian period (794-1185), and daily life. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expressions. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as EALC 583.) LEC
View current sections...
An intensive survey of China's history from the early 19th century to the present. Key topics include the decline of the traditional system, the rise of communism, the Maoist era, and the tensions of change and control in the 1980s and 1990s. (Same as EALC 584.) LEC
View current sections...
Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as EALC 587.) LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as EALC 588.) LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as EALC 589.) LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as EALC 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the yakuza, and political activists. (Same as EALC 596.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). (Same as EALC 597.) LEC
View current sections...
An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as AAAS 598.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the political, social, and economic development of West Africa until the colonial era. Major focus will be on the role of state formation, trade, ecology, and urbanization in the formation of centralized politics from the 11th to the 16th centuries and the impact of the process of Islamization and Muslim revolution on political and socioeconomic change in selected West African societies in the 19th century. LEC
View current sections...
This course surveys the cultural and political history of Tibet from the eighth to the twentieth century. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, students gain familiarity with the dominant features of Tibetan civilization. Topics include the relationship between Tibet and the civilizations of India and China, Tibetan Buddhism, and the tensions between the struggle for Tibetan independence versus claims of Chinese sovereignty. The course also considers the Tibetan diaspora and the reception of knowledge about Tibetan civilization in the West. LEC
View current sections...
This course considers contemporary China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in comparative perspective. It begins in the early twentieth century so as to set up a comparison between Nationalist, Communist and Colonial China. It focuses on the evolution from the 1940s to the present studying the political, economic and social systems of the three regions that constitute what we now call 'Greater China' and considers, in particular, important points of difference and similarity between them. LEC
View current sections...
Course examines the history of Japan from the end of the ancient period (c. 1200 AD) through the medieval era (approximately 1573). Issues covered include the formation and destruction of the Kamakura and Muromachi warrior governments, medieval religious life and culture. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expression. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC
View current sections...
A study of Indians in the United States from colonial times to the present. Consideration will be given to the political, social, and cultural history of selected Indian tribes and to Indian-white relations with particular attention to the Indian point of view. Other topics will include a comparative study of Indian policy of nations colonizing in America, cultural intermingling and cultural conflict, and current Indian problems. Slides, films, and guest speakers (including American Indians) will be used in the course. LEC
View current sections...
A history of the Plains Indians from the sixteenth century to the present. Consideration will be given to tribal culture and society, to the impact of the fur trade and international rivalries on tribes, and to Indian-white relations. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as EALC 520.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and PHIL 506.) Prerequisite: Eastern civilization course or a course in Asian history or a distribution course in philosophy. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores print, broadcast and online media in industrialized and developing nations. It examines how government rules and restrictions affect press freedoms, examines the effects of technology on access to information, explores how the U.S. media cover news in foreign countries, explores how foreign media cover news events in the United States, and examines coverage of critical current events. The goal of the course is to make students aware of the effects of mass media in a global economy. Prerequisite: Eight hours of Journalism. LEC
View current sections...
Introductory survey of the origin, evolution, and distribution of Indians throughout North America, location of tribes in historic times, their relationships to one another, and their responses to white penetration of the continent. Emphasis on American Indian leadership and major contributions of American Indian people to American society. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as ANTH 379,.) LEC
View current sections...
Although approximately 600 indigenous languages are spoken by 30 million people in Latin America, public life is conducted in Spanish. The class provides a comprehensive survey of language issues in Latin America by analyzing the situation of minority language groups, language rights, language policies, and language planning, as well as by considering the questions that arise regarding bilingual education, literacy, and the role of minority languages in educational systems. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major narrative trends including Amerindian languages and the analysis of "indigenista" literature. The African substratum of Latin American culture and its relation to concepts such as "marvelous realism" is explored. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are investigated as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The influence of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on their emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are explored as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The impact of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on the emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 379 or LAA 334. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the indigenous languages of Africa from a linguistic perspective, covering the main language families and their geographic distribution, and focusing on the features and structure of the more widely spoken and representative languages in each family (e.g. Fula, Hausa, Maninka, Swahili, Yoruba). (Same as AAAS 370.) LEC
View current sections...
Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning; writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. (Same as AAAS 470.) Prerequisite: AAAS 103, AAAS 305, or LING 106; or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The course examines the links between structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. (Same as AAAS 543) LEC
View current sections...
Addresses music as a social and cultural phenomenon shaping broader patterns of human activity. It examines the ideas, behaviors and beliefs people have about their music based on selected case studies of traditional and popular music from North America, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The main goal of this course is to understand why people from different parts of the world do music the way they do. LEC
View current sections...
Addresses music as a social and cultural phenomenon shaping broader patterns of human activity. It examines the ideas, behaviors and beliefs people have about their music based on selected case studies of traditional and popular music from North America, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The main goal of this course is to understand why people from different parts of the world do music the way they do. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to music as part of the cultural experience in India, Southeast Asia, the Orient, and Africa, with comparisons to Western traditions and influences on contemporary music. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and HWC 524.) Prerequisite: Eastern Civilization course, or a course in Asian history, or a distribution course in Philosophy. LEC
View current sections...
This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior course work in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and HIST 561.) LEC
View current sections...
A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes and ideas of China, Japan, and Korea. (Same as EALC 656.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course in East Asian studies. LEC
View current sections...
An evaluation of the traditional and contemporary political institutions, behavior and ideas of the countries of Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course in Asian history or Southeast Asian history. LEC
View current sections...
A focus on topics pertinent to all of the underdeveloped areas such as the role of the military, styles of political leadership, land tenure systems, the role of the middle sectors, the nature of bureaucracy, the activity of the students, and foreign policy attitudes. Prerequisite: One of the following: POLS 652, POLS 653, POLS 654, POLS 655, POLS 656, POLS 657, POLS 658, POLS 659. LEC
View current sections...
Survey of domestic and international political developments in the Middle East. Topics include: emergence of the modern nation-state, the role of Islam, leadership patterns, competing political ideologies, prospects for democratization, foreign policy relations, and regional conflicts. Prerequisite: Nine hours in political science, including POLS 150 and POLS 170 or their honors equivalents, or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. (Same as AAAS 600.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 305 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as SOC 640.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the epochal changes that have occurred in China from Deng Xiaoping's rise to power in 1978 to the present. Includes a focus on the historical background of the revolutionary period before examining the political and economic changes that spawned the 1989 "prodemocracy" movement at Tiananmen. The course includes an analysis of the events of the 1990s focusing on U.S.-China political and economic relations and the destabilizing effects of inflation, infrastructural reform, political and economic decentralization, and leadership succession. A previous course on China is helpful, but not mandatory. (Same as EALC 585.) LEC
View current sections...
A broad, survey-type course that examines all the former Soviet republics-Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions. The course addresses the history of the region, literature, culture, geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the unique cultures and societies of the Eurasian region (Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and to a lesser degree, Russia, Mongolia and Afghanistan). For the better part of the 20th Century, this distinct region of the world was hidden beneath the communist veneer of the Soviet Union. With the collapse of the USSR, the countries of this region are returning to their historic roots, and this course introduces students to the history, politics, economics, literature and general culture of these countries. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive, multidisciplinary survey of Central Asia, focusing on the former Soviet republics-Kazakhstan, Krygyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions (the Caucasus and the Caspian basin, Afghanistan, and western China). The course addresses the history of the region (from the Silk Road to Soviet rule), geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary course examining the development of Siberia from its beginnings to the present day. Topics to be covered are selected from the following list: topography and natural resources; conquest and exploitation by Russian and other European settlers; Siberia's role as a place of imprisonment and exile; the development of towns and transportation systems; Siberian historiography; Siberian Russian literature; and Siberia's place in Russia's economy and national defense. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary course examining the terrain, peoples, and cultures of the vast expanse in northern Asia known as Siberia. Areas of inquiry include geology, archeology, ethnography, religions, folk culture, the arts, science and education, politics, and environmental problems. With an emphasis on the natural and social sciences, and exploration of the relationship between Siberia and its neighbors in all directions, including the United States (Alaska, "Russian America"), this course can be taken without duplication by students who have already taken REES 512 (or SLAV 512) Siberia Yesterday and Today. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative (myth) kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed REL 331. (Same as GINS 330.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative (myth) kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed REL 330. (Same as GINS 331.) LEC
View current sections...
REL 350: Islam (3) NW / H / W
Origins of Islam; the Prophet Muhammad; the Holy Koran; religious symbols and moral mandates; historical developments. (Same as AAAS 349.) LEC
View current sections...
A historical and geographical survey of the Buddhist tradition from its origins in India to modern day developments in the three major regional Buddhist cultures of Southeast Asia, Tibet, and East Asia (China, Korea, and Japan). Prerequisite: Prior course work in Asian studies or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course consists of a spring break study in a Muslim country, meeting with women's NGOs and other women's groups and visiting sites of significance to women. Preparatory class sessions focusing on assigned readings precede the study abroad trip and a concluding class session follows it. A research paper is required. LEC
View current sections...
A study of pop songs, television, comics, and other idioms of popular culture from different parts of the Muslim world, with attention to Muslims' sense of humor, tragedy, aesthetics, and pertinent issues of the day. (Same as AAAS 450.) LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in India from the Vedic period to the present. LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in China from the Shang to the People's Republic. (Same as EALC 508.) LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in Japan from the Jomon period to the present. (Same as EALC 509.) LEC
View current sections...
Survey of religious thought and practice in Korea from the Three Kingdoms period to the present. Prerequisite: REL 106/EALC 105; EALC 104; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. (Same as AAAS 552.) LEC
View current sections...
A reading and media-rich survey of institutional, ritual, literary, educational, and exegetical practices that have shaped the lives of Buddhists in China, past and present. Alterities within the Buddhist tradition, and interactions with other religious options, are considered. (Same as EALC 555.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of developments in Sufi (Islamic Mystical) thought, poetry, and ritual throughout Muslim history and across the Muslim world. (Same as AAAS 650.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of the relationship between Islam, and gender roles and status in religious texts (Quran and Hadith) and in societies across the Muslim world, past and present. (Same as AAAS 657.) Prerequisite: AAAS349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introductory survey of the literature and culture of the South Slavic peoples: the Slovenes, Croats, Bosniacs, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians and Bulgarians. No language required. LEC
View current sections...
Description and analysis of the culture, structure, and development of societies that are historically unrelated to the traditions of Western civilization. LEC
View current sections...
Description and analysis of the culture, structure, and development of societies that are historically unrelated to the traditions of Western Civilization. Open only to students enrolled in the University Honors program or by consent of instructor. May not be taken by students who have credit in SOC 130. LEC
View current sections...
The sociological analysis of social, historical, and contemporary issues pertaining to the Middle East and to relations between the Middle East and other regions of the world. We use sociological theoretical perspectives to address such topics as nationalism and identity; religion, race and ethnicity; gender, socioeconomic development, and sociopolitical and economic relations with the United States. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 104, SOC 110, SOC 150, SOC 160, or SOC 220. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and/or the Middle East. (Same as AAAS 510 and AMS 534.) LEC
View current sections...
A systematic introduction to cross-cultural issues from the standpoint of sociology, designed to acquaint students with the full range of substantive and methodological issues that arise in comparative sociological inquiry, with a primary focus on non-western societies. Specific topics to be addressed may include war and peace, stratification and inequality, race and ethnicity, and political authority and power, all viewed in the light of cross-cultural research and theory. Prerequisite: A previous Sociology course or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as POLS 667). Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the general techniques of non-verbal theatrical conventions in African cultures. Practical training in movement vocabulary supplemented by lectures on the "text" of performance. There will be an end of semester "studio performance." (Same as AAAS 334 and DANC 230.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the origin and development of continental African theatre and its affinity to the Levant. Traditional, colonial and contemporary dramatic theories and experiments will be examined in play selections. (Same as AAAS 355.) LEC
View current sections...
The course develops an understanding of the postcolonial concept and its different manifestations in theatre and drama across nations and cultures. It approaches postcolonialism as a way of reading theatre, and as a genre within theatre by exploring how the "colonial project" has reconfigured the concept, content, and context of theatre in both colonized and colonizing cultures. In addition to the study of postcolonial playwrights and their works, the course is also an introduction to postcolonial theory and its critics. (Same as AAAS 429.) LEC
View current sections...
A survey of traditional and modern theatre and performance in Asia, with greatest attention given to India, China, and Japan. A study of plays, dramatic genres, history, conventions of play production, acting styles and other performance forms. (Same as EALC 527.) LEC
View current sections...
A critical study of issues and questions raised about women in contemporary African literature and implications for the larger society through the analysis of theme, language, characterization, roles and functions of women in selected works. (Same as AAAS 340.) LEC
View current sections...
This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Japanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, biological anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as ANTH 389.) LEC
View current sections...

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.