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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Medicine courses

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This field-based experience exposes students to a range of issues and trends in health care organizations - public and private, profit and non-profit. The aim is to engage students in the realities of health system challenges and problems, which can be informed by health services research. Site visits and contacts with executives and policy leaders serve as the basis for scholarly analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. FLD
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This field-based experience exposes students to current managerial realities and trends in information technology and data management within health care and policy settings. The aim is to engage students in information technology roles and functions, data set and performance metrics, available systems of technology support, and the scope of data collection, organization and management issues faced by health systems. Prerequisites: HP&M 868 or permission of the instructor. FLD
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Students select a problem area, critically review and analyze the research literature related to it and develop a research question(s) and working hypotheses. The analysis of the problem integrates field experiences with relevant literature, and translates ideas from the practice and/or policy setting into the context of scholarly inquiry. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. FLD
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Students build on a problem area of interest with potential benefit to the health care field and examine methodologies that would support a hypothesis or significant research question. The course guides students in translating their questions into a credible, methodologically defensible research design, including overall strategy, measurement, study population and/or sample. Focus will be placed on critical analysis of design trade-offs and limitations. Prerequisites: HP&M 870 or permission of the instructor. FLD
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Students learn to assess and choose appropriate analytic techniques, whether qualitative or quantitative, and develop a data analysis and presentation plan. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the relative advantages and disadvantages of various analytic strategies in the context of a specific question and research design. Prerequisites: HP&M 871 or permission of the instructor. FLD
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The management of large data sets is a critical analytic skill for health policy and management research. This course exposes students to the various types and configurations of large data sets and provides hands-on analytic experience using an array of statistical techniques and procedures. Attention is placed on the criteria for designing and evaluating, including the trade-offs in selecting one plan over another. Students actually carry out an analysis plan for a variety of data types. Prerequisites: HP&M 819, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Elementary statistical techniques to include descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, and statistical inference of means and proportions; advanced statistical techniques include multivariate analysis of qualitative and quantitative variables using multiple linear and logistic regression. LEC LEC
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Provides an opportunity for students to use a number of common analysis models in health services research. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of appropriate modeling techniques and use of statistical software packages. The course focuses on application of methods to health services research questions, with emphasis on regression design and interpretation. Prerequisite: HP&M 874 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the three publicly financed health programs that impact virtually all aspects of the American health care system - Medicare, Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). Explores history and evolution of each program, plus specific operational issues such as eligibility, financing, management reporting, state/federal coordination, quality of care and outcomes management and influence of recent legislation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC LEC
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A gender analysis of the organization of health care in the United States, using sociohistorical and sociological perspectives. Considers the health status and health care problems of women in relation to cultural aspects of medicine and health care; the roles of both informal and professional health care providers; the political economy of health care systems; and the relationship between gender and state. Prerequisite: HP&M 810, or permission of instructor. LEC LEC
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The course is designed to take the principles and mechanics learned in introductory epidemiology and biostatistics and apply them in the design of epidemiologic studies. The strategy and data collection for studies will be emphasized rather than the methods of statistical analysis. The student will learn how to develop a proposal/grant that addresses the entire array of concerns regarding such studies and propose a realistic, scientifically justified study. (Same as ANAT 869 and NRSG 889.) Prerequisite: HP&M 819 or HP&M 821, and NRSG 886. LEC
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Critical examination of the structure and function of health care systems in major, advanced, capitalist countries (e.g., Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Sweden) in comparison to each other and to the health care system of the United States. Patterns in control and financing will be studied in relation to issues of cost, quality, access, and in relation to cultural values. Special attention will be placed on comparative analysis of reform efforts. Prerequisite: HP&M 810 or permission of instructor. LEC LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to learn how the Swedish welfare state is organized and to see firsthand how it works on all levels and in various locations around the Stockholm-Uppsala area. Students will learn about Swedish history and culture and will be challenged to re-examine many commonly held assumptions about both Scandinavia and the United States. A special feature of the class is a visit to Helsinki, Finland, Sweden's Nordic neighbor. Finland offers an interesting variant on the "Nordic model" of health and social care, which demonstrates how a highly competitive business economy can be successfully combined with a strong program of public benefits and services. LEC
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This course examines techniques that are used in making clinical and management decisions when outcomes are uncertain. The course begins with a review of probabilistic decision making, then explores methods of analyzing choices with uncertain outcomes, stressing the use of decision trees and sensitivity analysis. The course examines cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, and cost benefit analysis. (SAME as PRVM 878). LEC LEC
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This course presents advanced techniques in statistical analysis and information management to help understand, process, and use health services data. The three broad areas of health services data will be used: clinical, program, and population-based. Ways in which these data can be used as both management and research tools will be discussed. Implications for improving patient care and delivery of health services will be emphasized. Labs will stress the use of both manipulative techniques such as merging, matching, sorting, and file construction, as well as focus on analysis, using univariate, bivariate, and multivariate techniques. Recent methodology related to outcomes, case-mix, and performance assessment will be presented, and their application to health services administration demonstrated. LEC LEC
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An overview of pedagogical approaches and learning strategies for higher education courses in health policy and management. Content will include course organization, syllabus design, techniques for teaching in the classroom and online, learning styles, strategies for classroom management, and evaluation/grading methods. Prerequisite: HP&M 868 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Students in this course apply the full spectrum of the research process to a specific hypothesis or research question, drawn from practical health systems observations and/or supported by critical analysis of the health services research literature. Moving step by step through the research process, students work to develop a complete research plan and proposal suitable to investigate their chosen question. Group discussion and guest researchers provide elaboration for each stage of research plan development. Prerequisites: HP&M 872 and HP&M 873 or permission of the instructor. RSC
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Application of the approaches and methods described in HP&M 885. Students will serve as a teaching assistant for one semester, working with a teaching mentor. In addition to assisting with the class, students will meet regularly with the mentor to critique and analyze content and classroom processes, plan and develop teaching activities, and evaluate learning and performance in the classroom. Prerequisite: HP&M 868 or permission of the instructor. HP&M 887 may be taken concurrently with HP&M 885. LEC
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This course allows exploration of special topics that are not routinely a part of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. IND LEC
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Students will investigate, review, and critically analyze major concepts, theoretical and methodological approaches and subareas in the field of health policy research. The course will cover comparative health policy analyses as well as both micro and macro system perspectives. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. SEM
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Students will investigate, review and critically examine major concepts, theories, issues, methodological approaches and subareas in the health services management research literature. Special attention will be placed on using research to develop evidence-based practice and suggestion interventional strategies for complex problems, both micro- and macro-organizational. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. SEM
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This course allows exploration of special topics that are not routinely a part of the curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to a PhD program and consent of the instructor. IND. LEC
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Individual study of special topics or problems by students working on a doctorate. Prerequisite: Admission to a PHD program and consent of the instructor. LEC
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An introductory course in immunology; cells and tissues of the immune system; B and T cells and their receptors; major histocompatibility complex; antigen presentation; regulation of immune responses; immunity and vaccination. Prerequisite: IGPBS courses or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introductory course in virology; replication of RNA and DNA viruses; viral RNA processing and translation; reverse transcription; virus assembly; viral pathogenesis; viruses as vectors. Prerequisite: MICR 801 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introductory course in bacteriology; cell structure and function; chromosome and plasmid replication; genetic engineering; bacteriophage; gene regulation; quorum sensing; antibiotics; protein secretion; bacterial pathogenesis. Prerequisite: MICR 801 & MICR 802 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Molecular and cellular aspects of immunity. Specific topics will include immunoglobulin and receptor structure/function, attributes of antigenicity, antigen-antibody reactions, immunocompetent cells, cellular interactions, soluble mediators of immune responses and normal and abnormal immune regulation. Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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Genetics of bacteria with emphasis on bacterial pathogens. Topics include: gene regulation, recombination, bacteriophages, transposons, genetic exchange, plasmids, genetics of virulence, bacterial adherence and colonization, immune evasion mechanisms, bacterial toxins, vaccines and antimicrobials, re-emerging bacterial diseases. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Molecular biology of animal viruses. Aspects of various virus groups to be covered include structure, replication, and host cell responses. Lectures and student seminars. Prerequisite: Permission of the course director. LEC
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Reports on research and literature. LEC
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This course is specifically designed to provide supervised research experience in various laboratories in the department. LEC
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Introduction to evolutionary biochemistry, and sequence comparison; sequence alignments and database searches; biological networks; reconstruction of metabolism and signaling from genome sequence; homology, orthology and paralogy; origin of new genes, homology and analogy in protein structure and function; tree, or perhaps the web, or life; horizontal gene transfer. Prerequisite: Enrolled in IGPBS program or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course is focused on the impact of infectious disease agents on modern civilization, with the examples of viral, bacterial, and protist agents. The main focus will be on viruses. We will cover, among others, viruses that cause influenza, HIV, hepatitis B and infectious mononucleosis. You will learn the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infectivity, and will see how the knowledge of the molecular, cellular, organismal, and epidemiological mechanisms of infection are translated into technologies for preventing and curing viral diseases. A special attention will be given to the impact of genome technologies, including new-generation sequencing, on our understanding of viruses and microbes and their role in biosphere, which is not limited to causing infectious diseases in humans. We will also examine how the application of the fundamental and technological aspects of virology for understanding and controlling diseases is influenced by geography, history, politics, and culture. Prerequisites: GSMC 850 and 851; or MICR 820; or MICR 893; or CORE 850; or instructor's permission. LEC
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1. Understand the basic concepts of host-pathogen interactions, with an emphasis on pathogen adhesion, invasion and intracellular survival, cell death pathways, innate immunity, and extracellular matrices. 2. Discuss the latest trends in host-pathogen interactions through paper discussion. 3. Provide graduate students opportunity to improve their communication skills. 4. Promote the scientific reasoning capabilities of graduate students. Prerequisites: This course is intended for the second-year microbiology graduate students who have taken Principles courses. Any graduate students from other departments may take this course. However, it is highly recommended to see the instructors before enrollment. LEC
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This course is designated for thesis research leading to the M.A. degree. LEC
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Restricted to writing of the dissertation. THE
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Physiology and growth of bacterial cells. Analysis of the current literature relating to microbial physiology presented in a seminar/discussion format. Topics to be covered include protein secretion, microbial development, cellular responses to environmental stresses, DNA replication and segregation, peptidylglycan biosynthesis and cell division. Prerequisite: MICR 820 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Topics in genetics with lectures and discussions about recent advances in microbial molecular genetics. The topics include the following with emphasis on genetic aspects: Sporulation and differentiation, bacterial pathogenicity, recombination, cell growth and division, DNA replication and site-specific mutagenesis. Prerequisite: MICR 820 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An advanced course dealing with a number of topics of special and current interest in modern virology. Lectures and/or conferences. Prerequisite: MICR 825 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An advanced approach to selected topics in any of the major disciplines in microbiology. Readings and conferences, or advanced laboratory techniques. LEC
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This course is restricted entirely to thesis research. RSH
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Restricted to actual writing of dissertation. THE
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The basic mechanisms of human disease, including cellular pathology, inflammation, diseases of immunity, neoplasia, infectious and circulatory diseases and aging are considered through the mechanisms of lectures, small-group problem based care study and autopsy demonstration. Prerequisite: Courses in cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalents. LEC
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Human disease is studied by organ systems to include cardiovascular, hematologic, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and nervous system diseases. The pathobiology of all major diseases occurring within each organ system are considered by lectures, problem based case study and autopsy participation. Since final comprehensive examination at the end of Pathology II will include material from both Pathology I and Pathology II. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pathology LEC
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A detailed study of diseases involving the endocrine, genitourinary, neuromuscular, and skeletal systems. Prerequisite: PATH 800 and courses in histology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalent. LEC
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Current concepts in the study of stem cells, and the clinical potential in modern disease treatment. Students will learn concepts of stem cells: origin, regulation of pluripotency, and differentiative potential; experimental isolation and manipulation; and clinical application of isolated stem cells. Current scientific literature will be used to highlight recent advances in stem cell biology. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethical and legal issues surrounding the use of stem cells of both adult and embryonic origin. Prerequisite: Course in cell biology (IGPBS module 4, or equivalent); consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the basic principles and contemporary literature of signal transduction pathways involved in cancer development and developmental biology. Faculty lecture and student presentations will address selected topics in cellular signal transduction. Student seminars will focus on the scientific content of the publication with emphasis on appropriate presentation of background information, experimental methods, results and potential future directions. Critical discussion of papers will be provided by participating students and faculty. Prerequisite: Course in Molecular Biology (IGPBS module 3, or equivalent). LEC
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Presentation of Pathology Department graduate student research-in-progress. Students will conduct a one-hour seminar in which updates of their current research project(s) in pathology will be reported. The seminars are interactive and students are encouraged to participate in discussion of the presented work. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum and status as a second-year graduate student; consent of instructor. RSC
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Current concepts in epigenetic regulation of transcription, including its involvement in disease. Current scientific literature will be used to examine recent advances in the role of epigenetic regulation in transcription and its impact on cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, development, and disease. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of epigenetic regulation and the role of the epigenetic regulation in various gene expression systems. The role of epigenetics in long-range DNA interactions will also be studied, with an emphasis on enhancer, silencer, and locus control region function. Recent advances in the role of epigenetics in disease, including cancer will also be examine. The course will examine current experimental methods to study epigenetics and gene regulation. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or equivalent; consent of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course in which students may select no more than three of the following: electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cell typing, morphometrics, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, DNA probe, autopsy technique. LAB
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Normal bone development, ultrastructure of bone, and the calcification mechanism. Developmental and genetic abnormalities of bone including dwarfism and osteogenesis imperfecta. Metabolic bone diseases including osteoporosis, Paget's disease and osteomalacia. Methods of diagnosis by morphometry of undecalcified bone biopsy. Common primary bone tumors, and the mechanism of bone loss or bone over growth caused by metastatic malignant tumors. There will be practical laboratory portion. Prerequisite: PATH 800 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Microbial factors, host reaction, and disease. Emphasis on recovery from infection, response to reinfection, the resultant clearance of microbes, or the development of chronic infection. Hypersensitivity phenomena will also be considered in the light of data from transplantation immunity. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LAB
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Offered by arrangement. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or its equivalent. IND
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A lecture and literature review course in which molecular, subcellular, and supracellular organization and function are considered in normal and disease states. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LEC
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Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis. Genetics. Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis. Initiation and promotion. Tumor Immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Anglogenesis. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PHCL 939 and PTOX 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC
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General principles of pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse effects, pharmacotherapeutics plus miscellaneous agents (antacids, cathartics, biologicals). Open to advanced B.S. students and graduate students in Nursing, Allied Health, and other health related programs. Independent study program with use of computer assisted instruction, textbooks, syllabi, consultation with staff and exams as primary teaching instruments. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: An Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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General principles of the autonomic nervous system, cholinergics, muscarinics, nicotinics, neuromuscular blockers, beta adrenergics, alpha adrenergics, and miscellaneous ANS agents. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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Antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, vasodilators, cardiac glycosides, serotonin, histamine, polypeptides, diuretics, antilipidemics. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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General principles of the central nervous system, stimulants, hallucinogens, depressants (hypnotics and sedatives), general and local anesthesia, antiparkinson agents, tranquilizers, analgesics and anticonvulsants. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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Principles of chemotherapy, sulfonamides, penicillins, aminoglycosides, anticancer and antifungal agents, antimalarials, broad spectrum antibiotics, antiparasitic agents, and antiseptics. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an Incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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General principles of endocrine function and use, thyroid drugs, insulin, sex hormones, oxytocics, adrenal steroids, antiinflammatory agents, blood drugs, anticoagulants and vitamins. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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General principles of toxicology, clinical toxicology, solvents, metals, gases and dusts, corrosives, plant and animal toxins, pesticides, radiation, miscellaneous. Students are encouraged to complete this course the semester they enroll. If this course is not completed, students will receive an incomplete grade. Prerequisite: PHCL 761 and an Enrollment Permission Form must be signed by the student and the instructor. In addition, the enrollment card must be stamped by the instructor. LEC
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Weekly meetings. LEC
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A discussion dealing with the literature and history of pharmacology. The development of the British school, German school and the origin of American pharmacology are emphasized. LEC
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Molecular foundations of drug action, including chemical structure of drugs, kinetics and consequences of drug-receptor interactions, and methods for characterizing receptors, and receptor-mediated events. Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846, PHSL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases; cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as ANAT 848, NURO 848, and PHSL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to Pharmacology for Graduate Students. Autonomic, Cardiovascular and Renal, Endocrine, Neuro, Antivirals Pharmacology. Autacoids; Workshop; Historical and Contemporary Methods used to Elucidate Mechanisms of Drug Action. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences or permission of the Instructor. LEC
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General principles of pharmacology, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, adverse effects, pharmacotherapeutics, plus miscellaneous agents (antacids, cathartics). Open to graduate students in Nursing, Allied Health, and other health related programs with adequate backgrounds in physiology and biochemistry. Independent study program with use of computer assisted instruction, textbooks, syllabi, consultation with staff and exams as primary teaching instruments. Prerequisite: Permission of department. LEC
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General principles of the autonomic nervous system, cholinergics, muscarinics, nicotinics, neuromuscular blockers, beta adrenergics, alpha adrenergics and miscellaneous ANS agents. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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Antihypertensive drugs, antiarrhythmics, vasodilators, cardiac glycosides, serotonin, histamine, polypeptides, diuretics, antilipidemics. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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General principles of the central nervous system, stimulants, hallucinogens, depressants (hypnotics and sedatives), general and local anesthesia, antiparkinson agents, tranquilizers, analgesics and anticonvulsants. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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Principles of chemotherapy, sulfonamides, penicillins, aminoglycosides, anticancer agents, antifungal agents, antimalarials, broad spectrum antibiotics, antiparasitic agents, and antiseptics. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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General principles of endocrine function and use, thyroid drugs, insulin, sex hormones, oxytocics, adrenal steroids, antiinflammatory agents, blood drugs, anticoagulants and vitamins. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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General principles of toxicology, clinical toxicology, solvents, metals, gases and dusts, corrosives, plant and animal toxins, pesticides, radiation, miscellaneous. Prerequisite: PHCL 881 and permission of department. LEC
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Pharmacology covers the following topics: establishment of rational pharmacological basis for drug therapy; physiological and biochemical effects of drugs and foreign compounds on biological systems; mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic and toxic effects, uses, and disadvantages of drugs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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For graduate students beginning their research training. RSH
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Chemical fundamentals in structure, actions and metabolism of drugs and toxicants. Included are molecular features of drugs and toxicants, steroisomerism, receptor theory, dose-response relationships, agonists and anatgonists, absorption, pharmacokinetics and structure-activity relationships. LEC
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For students in a master's program in pharmacology. THE
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A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with research methods in a number of specific areas in pharmacology. LAB
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Physical, chemical, and stereochemical aspects of drug action. Includes discussions of receptor theory, methods used in receptor studies and drug design. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or permission from the Department of Pharmacology. LEC
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Principles of nerve transmission. Emphasis is placed on the central nervous system. Includes a discussion of the neurochemical aspects. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or permission from the Department of Pharmacology. LEC
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Action of drugs on the heart and vascular system. Emphasis will be placed on physiological and biochemical mechanisms of drug action. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC
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Designed to acquaint students with the actions of drugs on neogenesis and manifestation of the immune response. Drug effects on T and B lymphocytes. Anti-inflammatory drugs. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC
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Discussion of drug effects on physiological homeostatic mechanisms. Includes hormones, polypeptides, histamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, catecholamines, and kinins. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC
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Drug action on cells and subcellular organelles. Drug effects on nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, and cell adhesion. Drug effects on tissue cultures. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC
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Designed to give practical and theoretical experience with drug trials in humans. Includes animal experimentation when warranted. Clinical principles of drug therapy will be emphasized. IND
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Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis, Genetics, Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis, Initiation and promotion. Tumor Immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PATH 939 and PTOX 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC
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Principles of basic, peripheral and central nervous system pharmacology and topics in immunopharmacology and neuroimmunopharmacology. Prerequisite: PHCL 841 or permission of course director. LEC
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Pharmacological principles of drug actions on the endocrine and cardiovascular systems. This includes the effects of drugs on the interactions of hormones and autocoids with the cardiovascular system. Prerequisite: PHCL 841 or permission of Course Director. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHCL 890. RSH
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Prerequisite: Open to students of advanced standing enrolled in the doctoral program in Pharmacology. THE
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The new student will be introduced to the faculty research programs. Each faculty member will present his/her research interests using one or more of the following formats: laboratory demonstrations, computer simulations and lectures. The objectives are to assist the new student in selecting his/her area of dissertation research and acquainting the new student with the department research resources. LEC
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All aspects of reproductive physiology including an in depth study of ovarian and testicular development/function, neuroendocrine development/function, implantation, placentation, puberty, pregnancy and fertility regulation are covered. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to support a graduate level text and didactic lectures. Prerequisite: a general endocrinology/physiology course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor. LEC
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Special studies designed and arranged on an individual basis to allow a student to pursue a particular subject through reading, special laboratory work, and conferences with a senior staff member. LEC
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This course will focus on principles that underlie genetic analysis, including mutation, complementation, recombination, segregation, and regulation. The genetics of commonly used model organisms such as yeast, flies, worms and mice will be examined, classic genetic screens performed to study phage assembly, cell cycle regulation, sex determination and X-chromosome inactivation will be discussed and modern-day techniques used to study inheritance and gene function in various systems will be analyzed. Human genetic analysis will also be covered, including population genetics, techniques for gene mapping, inherited diseases, genetic testing and gene therapy. Through reading and discussion of scientific literature and problem-based homework and exams, students will learn how to evaluate and interpret genetic data as well as develop and design genetic strategies to solve current biological problems. Prerequisite: Completion of IGPBS Core Curriculum or equivalent, or permission of Course Director. LEC
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