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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Medicine courses

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This course will provide an overview of health informatics focused on five themes: health informatics foundations; clinical decision support; human factors/organization factors; public health informatics and current issues in health informatics including best practices. Students enrolled for 3 credits will develop and demonstrate a practical, innovative small-group information technology (IT) project from one of a set of faculty recommended projects or from a student-proposed idea. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor LEC
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The application of the information system development life cycle in the design, selection, and implementation of health information technology applications will be examined. Human computer interactions and emerging technologies will be explored for their impact on patient care and safety. The role of legal, regulatory, ethical and security issues will be discussed as they apply to clinical and consumer information technologies. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Principles of database theory, modeling, design and manipulation will be introduced. Students will have experience using a relational database management system. Database manipulation will be explored by composing and executing query statements and critically evaluating the results. (Includes 3 credit hour didactic course, and optional 1 credit hour lab). PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Instructor. LEC
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This information system development life cycle process are presented with emphasis on determination and analysis of information system requirements and system design that meet the identified health care information requirements. Object-oriented techniques will be introduced, including Unified Modeling Languageand Unified Modeling Methodology, to facilitate process analysis and design proposal development. Prerequisites: NRSG 820 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Knowledge management is the creation, communication, and leveraging of a health care organizations' knowledge assets. Defining knowledge, describing the knowledge creation cycle, and the identification of the knowledge worker and his/her impact on the organization are discussed. Information technology and communities of practice are presented in a balanced approach supporting a systematic viewpoint of the knowledge management process. Knowledge management theory is enhanced with the performance of a knowledge audit and the development of knowledge management tools. Prerequisites: BUS 738, NRSG 820, or consent of instructor. LEC
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In collaboration with health care information faculty, preceptors, students design an experience to facilitate application of theories and research related to health care informatics. Emphasis is on the application of the information system development life cycle. Students analyze the leadership and technical behaviors of various informatics roles and negotiate an informatics project to be completed within the practicum. Prerequisite: All Common Core, Leadership Core, NRSG 853, Abstraction and Modeling of Health Care Information, NRSG 858, Health Data: Theory & Practice. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NRSG 854, Knowledge Management in Health Care, NRSG 855, Topics in Health Care Informatics, NRSG 898, Research Project in Nursing, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will conduct a health informatics research project. A research report, designed artifact, or other appropriate deliverable will be developed. Prerequisite(s): A research course and two informatics core courses, or consent of instructor. The capstone project must meet capstone guidelines for the MS Informatics program. LEC
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Basic methods in preparation of tissues and cells for ultrastructural studies; use of electron microscopy in specific research problems; interpretation of biological ultrastructure; reading assignments and discussion sessions. Prerequisite: ANAT 830, or consent of course instructor. LEC
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Analysis of the genetic causes and molecular mechanisms underlying mental disorders: an introduction to the principles and applications of medical genetics and syndromes associated with mental disorders. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia, an introduction to imprinting mechanisms and disorders including Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. An overview of the disorders, candidate genes and mutations linked to these disorders will be presented. Prerequisite: Introductory course in cell biology, development neurobiology, and/or neuroscience. LEC
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This course will bridge student knowledge of systems/organs with cellular histology and is designed as an accelerated introduction to histological techniques, microscope/optics, and histology. The course will be held within a one month period in the summer. Individual tissues will be covered by a brief 30 minute lecture followed by a 90 minute session of observing the tissues under the microscope. Prerequisite: Advanced course in cell biology (IGPBS module 4 or equivalent) or consent of instructor. LEC
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Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as PHCL 846, PHSL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon Growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell Survival and Growth; Synapse Formation; Synapse Elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as NURO 847 and PHSL 847.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; NURO 846; PHSL 846) or consent of instructor. LEC
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An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases; cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as NURO 848, PHCL 848, and PHSL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC
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Detailed analysis of developmental mechanisms in key vertebrate systems. Fertilization, cleavage, morphogenesis and gastrulation, axis determination, and organogenesis, with special attention to the most recent advances. Prerequisite: IGPBS Module 4 or consent of instructors. LEC
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All aspects of preparing grant applications are covered. This includes writing an actual grant application containing all the usual elements of grants - budgets, biosketches, resources, and scientific text. In addition, different funding agencies, building research teams, the review process, responding to reviewers, and resubmitting grants will be covered. (Same as HP&M 878 and NRSG 889.) Prerequisite: Appropriate research methods and statistics courses in student's current graduate program; and permission of the instructor. For students in the Outcomes Management and Research concentration, HP&M 821. LEC
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Advanced study allowing a student to pursue a particular research or educational skill through directed laboratory work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Special study allowing a student to pursue a particular subject through readings, laboratory work, and conferences with a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Research-oriented presentations in a seminar format by students, faculty, and guests. LEC
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Independent laboratory investigation approved by and under the supervision of the student's adviser, and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. degree. Prerequisite: Consent of adviser. RSH
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Preparation of the formal thesis based upon independent research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.A. degree. Credits will be given only after the thesis has been accepted by the department. Prerequisite: Consent of adviser. THE
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Research articles are analyzed by the student with the guidance of an instructor in terms of quality of scientific content and mechanics of the presentation. One or more articles are discussed in each tutorial session. The research topics and the instructor are chosen in accordance with the research interest of the student. LAB
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Original and independent laboratory investigation, approved by and conducted under the supervision of the students' adviser and advisory committee, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite: Consent of adviser. LEC
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Preparation of the dissertation based upon original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Credits will be given only after the dissertation has been accepted by the student's dissertation committee. Prerequisite: Consent of adviser. THE
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Chemistry of cellular constituents. Protein and nucleic acid structure and function. Enzyme catalysis. Biochemistry of membranes. Bioenergetics and cellular metabolism. A survey of biochemistry for non-basic science graduate students. Prerequisite: A course in organic chemistry. LEC
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Weekly meetings. LEC
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Application of physical techniques to the study of biological macromolecules in solution. Emphasis on utilization of data obtained from such studies in interpreting biological processes at the molecular level. Course will be taught in the spring. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. LEC
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Selected topics in biochemistry with varying subject matter. Students should inquire before enrolling. Topics are in-depth studies of current research areas. The course may consist of formal lectures and/or directed readings and studies. IND
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Students and faculty meet once weekly to discuss the research of students or the current biochemical literature. The student is required to make one presentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Research for the M.A. degree. RSH
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Restricted to the writing of the master's thesis. THE
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An in-depth analysis of the structure and function of gene regulatory proteins and the mechanisms of gene transcription, and DNA replication and repair. Lectures and discussion of current literature. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course will be presented in the fall semester and will include several faculty leading discussions in their area of research interests. LEC
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The relationship between protein structure, binding, and physiological function. Emphasis is on proteins as enzymes, structural components, and regulators. Course will be taught in the spring. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. LEC
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Research for the doctoral degree. RSH
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Restricted to the writing of the doctoral dissertation. THE
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Introductory course concerning the concepts of statistical reasoning and the role of statistical principles as the scientific basis for public health research and practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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First-semester course of a two-semester introductory statistics course that provides an understanding of the proper application of statistical methods to scientific research with emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to public health practice and research. This course focuses on basic principles of statistical inference with emphasis on one or two sample methods for continuous and categorical data. This course fulfills the core biostatistics requirement. Prerequisite: Calculus or Permission of Instructor. LEC
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This course will utilize statistical packages (SAS and SPSS) for data management and analysis. Collection and management of data along with one, two and multiple sample parametric procedures will be covered for categorical and continuous data. Simple linear regression will also be covered. LEC
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Second level statistics course that provides an understanding of more advanced statistical methods to scientific research with an emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to public health practice, public health research, and clinical research. Special focus will be upon the utilization of regression methodology and computer applications of such methodology. Prerequisite: BIOS 714 or equivalent. LEC
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Methods for designed experiments including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), two-way ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and analysis of covariance are emphasized. Post- ANOVA tests, power and testing assumptions required in NOVA are discussed and applied. Outlier detection using robust estimators also are incorporated. Boxplots, histograms and scatterplots are used to display data. Prerequisite: PRE 710/711 or BIOS 714/717 or equivalent. Preferred: BIOS 715. Knowledge of statistical software, basic statistical plotting methods, p-values, two-sample t-test and simple linear regression is assumed. LEC
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This course will study nonparametric methods in many situations as highlighted by the following topics: Students will learn how nonparametric methods provide exact p-values for tests, exact coverage probabilities for confidence intervals, exact experimentwise error rates for multiple comparison procedures, and exact coverage probabilities for confidence bands. This course will be using EXCEL and SAS to conduct various procedures. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714) or the equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC
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Simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, nonlinear regression, neural networks, autocorrelation, interactions, and residual diagnostics. Applications of the methods will focus on health related data. Prerequisite: 1) Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714) or the equivalent and 2) Fundamentals of Biostatistics II (BIOS 717) or Analysis of Variance (BIOS 720) or Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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An intermediate level statistics course that provides an understanding of the more advanced statistical methods to scientific research with emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to clinical research, public health practice, public health research and epidemiology. Prerequisite: BIOS 714, BIOS 715, and BIOS 717 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course is an advanced statistical course for students who have had fundamental biostatistics and linear regression. Topics to be covered include Hotelling's T-squared test, MANOVA, principal components, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical analysis, and cluster analysis. More advanced topics such as Multidimensional Scaling or Structural Equation Modeling might be introduced if time allows. Computers will be extensively used through the whole course, and students are suggested to be familiar with some statistical software before taking this course. Although students are allowed to use the software they are comfortable with, SAS will be the primary statistical package used to demonstrate examples in this course. PREREQUISITES: BIOS 730 Applied Linear Regression or equivalents or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to computer programming in the R (S-Plus) and STATA language environments. The students will develop and run codes appropriate for most standard statistical models and related data analyses; develop code to import data of various types; conduct graphical and data analyses; apply appropriate models to investigate patterns and specific hypotheses. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The design, implementations, analysis, and assessment of controlled clinical trials. Basic biostatistical concepts and models will be emphasized. Issues of current concern to trialists will be explored. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. LEC
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This is a graduate level course preparing a student for the SAS base programming certification exam. We will cover the topics required for a student to pass the SAS base programming certification exam given by SAS. To this end, topics we will study will include, referencing files and setting options, creating list reports, understanding data step processing, creating and managing variables, reading and combining SAS data sets, do loops, arrays, and reading raw data from files. After the completion of the course the student should be able to create SAS programs to read data from external files, manipulate the data into variables to be used in an analysis, generate basic reports showing the results. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor LEC
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This course is an introduction to nonparametric statistical methods for data that do not satisfy the normality or other usual distributional assumptions. We will cover most of the popular nonparametric methods used for different scenarios, such as a single sample, two independent or related samples, three or more independent or related samples, goodness-of-fit tests, and measures of association. Power and sample size topics will also be covered. The course will cover the theoretical basis of the methods at an intermediate mathematical level, and will also present applications using real world data and statistical software. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The emphasis of this course is on learning the basics of experimental design and the appropriate application and interpretation of statistical analysis of variance techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, BIOS 820 recommended. LEC
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This course provides an understanding of both the mathematical theory and practical applications for the analysis of data for response measures that are ordinal or nominal categorical variables. This includes univariate analysis, contingency tables, and generalized linear models for categorical response measures. Regression techniques covered for categorical response variables, such as logistic regression and Poisson regression methods, will include those categorical and/or continuous explanatory variables, both with and without interaction effects. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor; BIOS 820 and BIOS 840 are recommended. LEC
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This course is an introduction to model building using regression techniques. We will cover many of the popular topics in Linear Regression including: simple linear regression, multiple regression, model selection and validation, diagnostics and remedial measures. Throughout the semester, we will be utilizing primarily SAS. Prerequisite: By permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the fundamentals of probability theory, random variables, distribution and density functions, expectations, transformations of random variables, moment generating functions, convergence concepts, sampling distributions, and order statistics. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the fundamentals of statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, including point and interval estimation, likelihood and sufficiency principles, properties of estimators, loss functions, Bayesian analysis, and asymptotic convergence. Prerequisite: BIOS 871 or by permission of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and methods of linear models for data analysis. The course includes the theory of general linear models including regression models, experimental design models, and variance component models. Least squares estimation, the Gauss-Markov theorem, and less than full rank hypotheses will be covered. Prerequisites: BIOS 871 and BIOS 872 or permission of instructor; BIOS 820 recommended. LEC
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This course provides students with experience in collaborative research under the supervision of an experienced researcher. The student will spend one semester working under an investigator or faculty member, making independent contributions to a research project. Prerequisites: BIOS 820, 830, 835, 840, 871, 872, and 890 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The aim of the course is to teach the methodologies and skills required for conducting research in the area of biomedical sciences. The learning experience will be tailored to individual needs, personalized instructions, with the opportunity to learn new skills and competencies and exposure to new developments. Depending on the selected research placement, the student will learn to: utilize a variety of basic biochemical and molecular biology laboratory skills; develop the ability to independently formulate a testable experimental hypothesis; design experiments to test formulated hypothesis in a classic application of the scientific method. Progress of the student will be monitored through weekly laboratory meetings with members of the research lab. The student will present their progress and have the ability to receive constructive feedback from laboratory members. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LBN
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Postdoctoral Studies RSH
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Effective use of language to communicate scientific ideas and concepts. Topics include: Intense use of the English language for scientific communication both written and verbal; emphasis will be placed upon verbal; proper pronunciation, grammar, sentence organization, and word choice. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon listening and reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend a weekly lecture and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon grammar, punctuation, listening and reading comprehension, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend two weekly lectures and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will be given an exam at the end of each part of the textbook and will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course requires a 6 hour time commitment each week over the semester. During each weekly session the student will observe various medical practitioners in specific health care environments. The course gives the bioengineer an opportunity to see the inside of medical practice and exposes students to medical questions and challenges that could provide opportunities for engineers to contribute to the improvement of medical practice. Each student must select a concentration for this course from a health care specialty depending on availability. Some specialty options might include: Orthopedic, Radiology, Cardiology, Physical Therapy, etc. Grading will be pass/fail based on participation and journal keeping. PREREQUISITES: Graduate engineering standing, Consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is the first of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of metabolism, protein structure and an introduction to nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the second of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of molecular genetics, DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription and translation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the first semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 850 (Proteins and Metabolism) and GSMC 851 (Molecular Genetics). LEC
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This course is the third of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cellular structure and function. Topics include the lipid bilayer, membrane proteins, and cellular organelles. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the fourth of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cell communication. Topics include G-protein-coupled signaling, cellular cytoskeleton; cell cycle control; cell death; extracellular matrix; and cancer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the second semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 853 (Cellular Structure) and GSMC 854 (Cell Communication). LEC
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The objective of this course is to introduce students to research ethics. Students will learn and discuss some of the following areas of ethics in research: 1) sources of errors in science, 2) Scientific Fraud, 3) plagiarism and misrepresentation, 4) conflicts of interest, and 5) confidentiality. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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The objective of the course is to teach students how to organize and present data in a clear and concise manner at national meetings. Students are taught basic principles of organizing data for presentation and then learn through the actual presentation of data in simulated platform sessions held in the course. Videotapes are made of the presentations, and students are then given a constructive critique of their presentation by the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted to the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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This course was created to provide students with sufficient introduction to the research conducted at KUMC. To facilitate this point, the course is designed as a seminar series. In each session of the series, three faculty members present a brief 20-minute overview of their research programs. The series will help students to select faculty for research rotations and ultimately help them determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. LEC
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The course will introduce students to research methods, experimental design, and the types of biomedical research conducted at KUMC. The first research rotation begins halfway through the first semester; the second and third research rotations will occur in the second semester. It is designed to help students determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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Concepts basic to conducting biomedical research ethically: fraud, plagiarism, and misrepresentation; intellectual property; collection and interpretation of data; conflicts of interest; reporting misconduct by others. Animal research issues. Human research issues, including federal regulatory structure and informed consent. No prerequisites. LEC
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This course introduces students to the health care system of the United States. The course stresses the system's historical development, distinguishing features, financing, management, resources, and politics. Requirements include position papers, class discussions, examinations, and site visits to health care facilities LEC
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A gender analysis of the organization of health care in the United States, using sociohistorical and sociological perspectives. Considers the health status and health care problems of women in relation to cultural aspects of medicine and health care; the roles of both informal and professional health care providers; the political economy of health care systems; and the relationship between gender and the state. (Same as SOC 617.) Prerequisite: HP&M 601 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The structure and function of the components of the U.S. health care system are introduced in the context of the history, values and social forces that influenced its development and evolution. Students gain exposure to the concepts and vocabulary associated with aspects of the system, including delivery (providers, institutions, services), resources (finance, payment, insurance), population and public health, and outcomes (cost, access, quality). Health Care outcomes from consumer, clinical, and societal perspectives are explored. LEC LEC
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Introduces epidemiology, survey research, and evaluation research. Examines quantitative and qualitative methods. Focuses on role of research in health policy and health management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, papers and presentations. LEC
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This course introduces the core concepts from economics to health care with a focus on helping health care managers use economic tools in making sound decisions. The demand for health care products, the structure of insurance, and the supply of health care products are examined. Students will apply a variety of economic analyses to health policy and health system issues. LEC LEC
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Financial accountability is a critical responsibility of health services administrators. This course presents basic concepts and techniques for effective decision-making and stewardship, including financial statement analysis; strategic financial planning; capital formation; responsibility and cost accounting; operational, capital and cash budgeting; capital project analysis;' and working capital management. LEC LEC
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Administrative applications of economic and financial concepts are applied to support strategic and financial goals. The concept of integrating operational and strategic planning into a strategic financial plan is developed. This course will foster integration and confidence in performing and applying financial analytical procedures such as financial statement ratio analysis; revenue and expense forecasting (budgeting); credit worthiness determination; break-even analysis and working capital management in a variety of health care settings including long-term care and public health. Prerequisite: HP&M 825, Financial Concepts in Health Care Management. LEC LEC
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Reimbursement and fiscal policy practices impact the success and the economic well-being of health care institutions, payers and patients. This course develops the student's understanding of complex reimbursement methodologies from the perspective of providers and payers. Students will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the major methods of third party reimbursement, the types of managed care organizations and the payment methodologies employed. Students are also prepared to approach reimbursement policy issues both from the payer and the provider viewpoint. LEC LEC
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The functions of health services governance will be examined, including the leadership role of health services administrators in their interactions with the board. While the board sets the tone for legal and ethical functions, the effective administrator builds on and co-creates with the broad mechanisms that ensure public accountability. Governance models, ethical frameworks and issues, and principles of health law are interpreted for administrative practice, including frameworks and issues, and principles of health law are interpreted for administrative practice, including methods for conducting board evaluation and providing feedback. LEC LEC
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This course examines the development, implementation, and evaluation of federal, state, and local health policy in the United States. Particular attention will be given to (1) the development of public institutions and policy goals; and (2) current policy problems such as cost controls, reimbursement, health services utilization, program assessment and evaluation, public health, and public/private investment and resource planning. Students will be expected to synthesize and integrate knowledge to apply theory and principles in ways consistent with professional practice as a health policy analyst. LEC LEC
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Provides students with (a) an understanding of major issues in rural health and the rural environment in which health care providers and administrators provide service; (b) an understanding of the demographics, economics, services and challenges associated with the health care delivery systems in rural America and (c) an overview of federal and state health policy and its effect on rural health systems. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying, understanding, and addressing rural health challenges from administrative and policy perspectives. LEC
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Self-discovery as a foundation for professional development while exploring the concepts of leader, manager, and follower is emphasized. Analysis and prediction of an organization's stages of development and its capacity for linear and social change are introduced through the lens of complexity science. Political, legal, ethical, and other issues that constrain and destabilize organizations and strategies to restore equilibrium are explored. (Same as NRSG 880). LEC LEC
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This course examines the nature and characteristics of the health care workforce needed to deliver direct, indirect, and support services. Health Care worker roles are analyzed through the lens of key organizational functions and care delivery modalities. Common care delivery models, such as primary, team, and patient-centered care approaches to organizing care delivery are explored in various clinical settings, including acute and long-term care and community and public health entities. Administrative challenges and opportunities for managing a diverse workforce are presented. LEC. LEC
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This course focuses on attaining proficient communication skills to deliver high impact messages to stakeholders ranging from board members, to diverse communities of interest, to policymakers and regulators. Verbal and written skill development addresses executive presence to perform communication functions such as conducting an 'ask' from a policymaker or potential benefactor, using storytelling and data to shape critical messages to the media, and communicating value-driven memoranda to internal audiences. The use of emerging technologies to aid in communication effectiveness will also be presented. LEC. LEC
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This course covers fundamental concepts of management information systems; current and developing health and business information systems of interest to managers in health services organizations; health care information system architecture; security and privacy issues; uses of health care information for clinical and strategic analysis and decision support; techniques required to develop and evaluate a technological request for proposal; and thoughts on the future of health care information systems including bio-informatics, community health systems and web-based access to health information. The course will also cover current information and issues regarding the latest technology applications. LEC LEC
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This course examines the interplay between institutional practices and policy development aimed at evidence-based design, plant technology, safety science, and risk management. Students gain exposure to regulatory policies and learn concepts of organization and structural design and its influence on satisfaction, safety, and work dynamics useful in the operations and maintenance of effective health services organizations. Design is approached as a comprehensive and multidimensional decision-making process that requires communication, budgeting, and facilities system analysis and evaluation in all health services settings. LEC. LEC
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Examines performance of health care organizations, sources of variation, methods of measurement, and strategies for improving performance. Considers several approaches to performance improvement and examines tools widely used in operations management. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork. (Same as NRSG 882.) LEC
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Leaders must be both strategically and operationally oriented to meet the challenging health care needs of populations-of-interest within a service area. Methods to assess, interpret, and plan for shifting markets will be explored, using a variety of data-capture tools. Strategic planning approaches are presented, which emphasize the nimbleness and resiliency in destabilizing or shifting health care markets. Strategic issues and trends that support service line development, program expansion, and foster cultural and social programming are studies with emphasis on patient and family-centric care and personalized health care as part of communicating and marketing strategic options. Program evaluation and other evaluation strategies are reinforced to measure strategic impact. LEC LEC
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Explores internal and external analysis for health care organizations. Examines development, analysis, execution, and monitoring of strategies. Application of critical thinking skills to strategy. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisites: Completion of HP&M Level I courses or permission of instructor. LEC
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The focus of this course is to understand the leadership functions of human resource management in organizations to create a competitive edge through employee empowerment. Core human resource concepts are introduced and applied to optimize human capital within a variety of health care settings, including compensation and benefits, employee recognition, and employee/labor relations. National, regional and local strategies and workforce trends are discussed related to best practices for the selection, retention, and management as a health care employer of choice. (Same as NRSG 891). LEC LEC
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This course will trace the development of the outcomes research movement and provide examples of methodologies, assessment instruments and issues that guide outcomes research. It will also review the methods for linking research findings with clinical practice (i.e., clinical practice guidelines). Obstacles to acceptance of practice guidelines will be discussed. Finally, the translation of outcomes research methodology into programs to improve health quality will be presented. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Health Care as a cultural and socio-behavioral system is presented. Using research and theory, students explore alternative perspectives on the nature of medicine and healing within comparative health systems, both U.S. and abroad. Students examine at an advanced level how health care organizational structures contribute to patient health outcomes and influence employee behaviors. The course reinforces the nature and characteristics of the health professions, particularly medicine and nursing perceptions, and the complex behavioral dynamics of health professionals with organizational leaders. LEC LEC
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Prepares students for an initial professional job search. Explores professional networking, search strategies, resume construction, and interviewing. Reviews professional communication. Incorporates lecture, discussion, and fieldwork. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Novice and experienced health services administrators function in applied settings. The internship is designed to meet the needs of individual students to advance their career functioning and set in motion a professional development plan. The inexperienced administrator will use the internship as a mid-curriculum opportunity to apply and synthesize in the practice setting knowledge, skills, and abilities. Students who come to the program with mid-level to advanced experience use the practicum to advance their career through exposure to additional experiences that extends their knowledge, skills, and abilities and demonstrates synthesis of program competencies. FLD FLD
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The knowledge, skills, and abilities learned throughout the program are validated in capstone experience. A case study approach will be used to synthesize and apply principles including, but not limited to, change theory and quality improvement, research and information technologies, strategy and communication tools, human resource management, financial and economic analysis, and advanced decision-making and management of organizational behavior. Students will present their cases to peers, faculty, and external reviewers for dialogue, critique, and a plan for professional skills development. IND. RSH
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A course to explore applied research topics associated with specific health services delivery of management problems. Prerequisites: HP&M 821 and HP&M 830. RSH RSH
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This course is designed to meet the needs of students who have a special interest that cannot be met by existing courses. IND IND
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