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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Amharic texts and discussion in Amharic. Prerequisite: AMHR 120. LEC
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Continuation of AMHR 210. Discussion in Amharic of texts studies. Prerequisite: AMHR 210. LEC
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An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 101. LEC
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An introduction to the history and key concepts of American Studies. Students explore major changes in American culture through the critical reading and analysis of primary and secondary source material. Not open to students who have taken AMS 100. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as SOC 110.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 110 or SOC 110. (Same as SOC 112.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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An introduction to the Latino/a population (Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Dominican-Americans, and Central and South Americans) in the US. Students discuss how US and Latin American societies have shaped Latino incorporation into the United States. We also discuss contemporary political, cultural and social issues that pertain to Latinos/as in the US. (Same as SOC 260) LEC
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A broad introduction to religion in American culture. This class emphasizes the well-established religions with large followings (viz. Judaism, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and Protestantism). Some attention is also given to other religions active in America. Other topics covered include the relationship of church and state, religion in ethnic and racial minority groups, and women and religion. Not open to students who have taken REL 172 or REL 372. (Same as REL 171.) LEC
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An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from the initial European settlements to 1876. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as HIST 310.) Prerequisite: AMS 100 or AMS 110 or H IST 128. LEC
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An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from 1877 to the present. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as HIST 312.) LEC
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This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AAAS 317, HIST 317, and WGSS 317.) LEC
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Examines the politics of immigrant, citizenship and space through official, intellectual and popular responses to the growth of Latino/a populations in the U.S. and to international migration to and from Mexico and Central America. Topics include consideration of how responses to immigration articulate racialized and culturally specific (including linguistic and religious) concepts of the nation, and how questions of citizenship and residency dovetail with issues of community "voice", public space, and diverse notions of "security". LEC
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Examines modernism as a transnational cultural movement primarily from the 1890s to the 1940s, but also considers the impact of modernism on later twentieth century cultural production. Provides an interdisciplinary exploration of art, architecture, film, literature and music. Topics include debates related to periodization, the nature of progress, the impact of colonialism and imperialism, the power of reason, and the relationship to previous "traditional" ideas. LEC
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The social structure and organization of American society with special reference to recent social changes. (Same as SOC 330.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in sociology or American studies. LEC
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Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as SOC 332). LEC
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The course focuses on the concept of leadership and on black leadership in the United States; an in-depth analysis of selected case studies on black leaders, both historical and contemporary. Some attention will be given to the dispersion of Africans into the Americas and the leadership that emerged, conditioned both by environmental factors and the psychology engendered by the system of slavery. Selected successful black leaders will be invited to visit the class from time to time. (Same as AAAS 330.) LEC
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This course examines in depth a specific American studies or theme. LEC
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Examines the African American cultural movement through art; the artistic gaze in novels; representations of African Americans in film; as well as the influence of musical and dramatic performance on the African American image. Considers the impact of American, European, and other cultural influences on black artists of the time. LEC
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An introduction through a topical theme to theories and methods currently used in American Studies. Prerequisite: AMS 100, AMS 110 and AMS 332 or their equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the different physical, economic, and cultural settings in the United States and Canada which form the basis for the various forms of livelihood. Emphasis on the United States. (Same as GEOG 390.) Prerequisite: An introductory geography course, or background in United States or Canadian history, social science, or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Interdisciplinary study of selected aspects of American society or culture or of the American experience. LEC
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A survey of women's roles as housewives, mothers, consumers, workers, and citizens in pre-industrial, commercial, and early industrial America. (Same as HIST 530 and WGSS 510.) LEC
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A survey of women's history in the United States that will include radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as HIST 531 and WGSS 511.) LEC
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This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as HIST 532 and WGSS 512.) LEC
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Examines histories of U.S. women during World War II through an interdisciplinary approach that draws on popular culture and oral history. Utilizes theories and methods of oral history and examines representations of women such as Rosie the Riveter, GI Jane and the Sweetheart at Home. Topics include the consumption of images, the function of images in war and the relationship between popular culture and war. LEC
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The study of special topics in Latino Studies. Students may repeat this course when different topics are offered. LEC
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Analysis of the basic sociological concepts that apply to majority-minority relations; with special emphasis on racial and ethnic interaction in the United States. (Same as SOC 522.) Prerequisite: A distribution course in sociology or American studies. LEC
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The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. (Same as AAAS 585 and THR 529.) LEC
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An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. (Same as AAAS 510 and SOC 534.) LEC
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An examination of the history, sociology, and culture of U.S. ethnic categories (e.g., American Indians, Latinos, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, Irish Americans). The specific group studied varies from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit. (Same as SOC 536.) Prerequisite: A principal course in American Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Surveys scholarship on urban expressive culture as it illuminates the politics to identity and public space by African American and Latino/a urban communities. Explores how race, class and gender positionality affect and reflect access to public space and recognition in the public sphere through aesthetic practices such as hip-hop, graffiti writing and custom car cruising. LEC
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A seminar exploring a specific American studies theme. A research paper or equivalent project is required. Prerequisite: AMS 360 (a grade of C or better is recommended) or consent of instructor. Cannot be taken concurrently with AMS 551, AMS 552 or AMS 553. LEC
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Independent research on a selected topic under the direction of a faculty member. Students write an original research paper or complete an equivalent project in another medium, grounded in primary as well as secondary sources. Prerequisite: AMS 550 or consent of instructor. RSH
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Independent public service in a selected area undertaken in consultation with and under the direction of a faculty member. Students produce a final written project on the experience that integrates the public service experience and academic materials, or complete an equivalent project in another medium. Prerequisite: AMS 550 or consent of instructor. FLD
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Honors equivalent of AMS 551. May be taken twice for credit. Three hours of AMS 553 may be substituted for a course in an appropriate category in the American Studies major. Prerequisite: AMS 550, eligibility for departmental honors, or consent of instructor. RSH
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Study of American literary works before 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 576.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of American literary works after 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 577.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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This course brings a human face to the 21st century manifestation of globalization by focusing on the issues of culture, gender and migration. How do these three aspects create the "global village" amongst both the host and donor peoples? When people move from one place to another, what do they leave behind, what do they take with them? What is gained, or lost by the host community? What is the impact of migration on a specific group's and individual's sense of identity? How has migration affected the people's construction, understanding, and practice of gender? Given their primary roles in the home and within the culture, these questions and more are posed with particular attention to women. Migration theories, interviews and personal testimonies as well as literary and dramatic works are critical to our analyses of the issues raised and enable us to hold conversations with, and listen to the stories of the ordinary people who make globalization happen and sustain it. (Same as AAAS 565 and WGSS 565.) LEC
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Distributions of major culture elements including folk architecture, religion, dialect, foodways, and political behavior are systematically studied from a predominantly historical perspective. These discussions are followed by a survey of the major culture regions in America. Although not absolutely necessary, familiarity with concepts treated in any of the following courses would be helpful: AMS 100, AMS 110, ANTH 108, ANTH 308, GEOG 102, or GEOG 390. (Same as GEOG 576.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary approach to food that explores the diversity of eating habits across the United States and the role of food as an indicator of cultural identity and change. Current regional and ethnic food consumption patterns are stressed. Topics include multiculturalism and regional identity, the symbiotic relationship between restaurant food and home cooking, the recent interest in farmers' markets and organic foods, and the importance of the food industry and the popular press in setting trends. (Same as GEOG 579.) LEC
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A survey of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from colonial to recent times. (Same as HA 570.) Prerequisite: HA 100, HA 151, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Examines the ways that contemporary East Asian films and the American film industry appropriate cinematic techniques, styles and themes from one another. Uses cultural studies theories to examine the construction of cultural and historical narratives of transnational interaction among East Asian countries. Explores the impact of economic globalization on transnational film production. LEC
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Examination of organized sport as a social institution and its relation to other social institutions (e.g., political, economic, educational, and religious), with special emphasis on American society. Analysis of the social correlates of sports participation and a consideration of the role of sport in social change. (Same as SOC 629). Prerequisite: A principal course in American studies or sociology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course considers cultural and social histories of jazz, from the 1920s through the present day, as sites for exploring ideological struggles over such fields as race, class, gender, sexuality, democracy, capitalism, freedom, community, Americanness, and globalization in the U.S. The course will explore such questions as the following: What music was called jazz at what times and places? What did it mean to whom? Who played it? Who wrote about it? Who listened to it? Who danced to it? Who policed it? Who produced it? Who used it to rebel? Who used it to survive? What did all of these practices mean to participants? The course will examine struggles over social meanings in the U.S. through a study of jazz performance, labor, representation, marketing, consumption, censorship, and historiography. Prerequisite: A course in American studies, American history, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Survey of jazz music, from ragtime and blues to jazz of the 1940s and 50s. Covers various styles of jazz, including New Orleans, swing, bebop and cool. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of melody, harmony and rhythm, although ability to read scores is not necessary. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC
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Survey of jazz music, from 1950s to the present. Covers various styles of jazz, including free jazz, postmodern jazz and fusion. Students are expected to have a basic understanding of melody, harmony and rhythm, although ability to read scores is not necessary. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC
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Examines the literary and musical significance of jazz autobiographies since the 1940s. Authors include Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Billie Holiday, Charles Mingus, Nina Simone and others. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC
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Examines jazz and musicians' life stories in prose fiction and fictional or biographical films. Novels may include works by John Clellon Holmes and Nathaniel Mackey. Films may include Lady Sings the Blues and Space is the Place. Graduate students will complete additional work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC
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Examines critical approaches to the study of African American cultural production. Uses literature, films, music, art and performance to explore the development of interpretations of black culture. Covers major developments in black aesthetics in the twentieth century, various theoretical schools of thought, and significant writers such as bell hooks, Stuart Hall, and Gina Dent. Graduate students will complete additional course work to be determined in consultation with the instructor. LEC
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Consent of instructor is required. IND
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Interdisciplinary study of different aspects of the American experience in different semesters. LEC
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Lecture and discussion sections covering the four primary fields of Anthropology: Biological Anthropology, Linguistics, Social Anthropology, and Archaeology. Concepts and approaches to each field, using past and present examples from around the world, will be examined with an emphasis on the unity of the anthropological approach. Future directions of human experience are explored. Discussion sections will be used to examine material covered in lecture and in readings in specific cultural and evolutionary contexts. Discussion and application of fundamental concepts to contemporary events, examination of fossil collections, and viewing and discussion of relevant visual materials are among topics to be covered in sections. LEC
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Lecture and discussion sections covering the mechanisms and principles of Darwinian evolution with special emphasis on human and primate data. Lecture topics include genetics, variation, primate ethology, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Discussion sessions include topics in Mendelian and population genetics, blood group systems, quantitative morphological variation, and fossil human and primate skeletal material. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 104 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as LING 106.) LEC
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Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as LING 107.) LEC
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An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, and themes of cultural anthropology. The variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of cultural complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 108 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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A general introduction to the study of archaeology. Evolution of prehistoric cultures in adaptive response to changing natural and social environments, from the early Paleolithic to the emergence of urban civilizations. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 110 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360. LEC
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Violent change, revolution, planned change, and peaceful transition in non-Western cultures. A study of development, modernization, nation-building, rapid acculturation, and war. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 160 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 160 or ANTH 360. LEC
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An anthropological survey of the artistic traditions of selected people to understand aesthetics and styles in their religious, technological, and social context, including the effects that industrialization, tourism, and exposure to world culture have had on these traditions. LEC
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A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy which are better known to the Western world. (Same as EALC 130.) LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 100. Not open to students who have had ANTH 100. LEC
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An exploration of the human ways through films. Cross-cultural interpretations by filmed records of varieties of interpersonal relations seen through such aspects of culture as hunting, war, marriage, religion, sex, kinship, and death. Patterns of interactions are analyzed by examples from cultures around the world, primarily the non-Western world. LEC
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This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as AAAS 303.) LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105. LEC
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An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, themes of cultural anthropology, and the variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of culture complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 108 or ANTH 109. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 110. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 110 or ANTH 111. LEC
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Recent discoveries in anthropological archaeology in various areas of the world and their impact on existing bodies of fact and theory, and on established methods of archaeological discovery. LEC
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A survey of prehistoric art focusing on the material record and interpretations of rock art (paintings, engravings on rock surfaces in rock-shelters, caves and in open air sites) and portable art created by prehistoric people. The emphasis is on the small-scale societies (hunter-gatherer and early food producers) around the world before the appearance of written records in respective geographic areas. Environmental, social and cultural contexts in which these art forms were created are discussed along with a review of past scholarship and current interpretive approaches to this old and enduring expression of human creativity. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. (Same as HA 315.) LEC
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A survey of one million years of prehistory from the peopling of the European continent to the Roman Empire. The course will focus on the growth of culture, considering economy and technology, art and architecture. Topics will include the Neanderthals, the big game hunters of the Ice Age, the megalith builders, the Celts. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, history, or cultural geography. LEC
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A survey of the changing lifeways of Native Americans in Kansas from the time of the earliest inhabitants of at least 12,000 years ago to the period of Euro-American contact. Extensive use will be made of Museum of Anthropology collections. LEC
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Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as LING 320.) LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as LING 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of biochemical and physical variability in contemporary human populations. Topics include: genetic basis of human diversity, evolutionary theory, population genetics, blood groups, biochemical variations, body size and shape, pigmentation, and other morphological characteristics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The evolutionary processes and events leading to the development of humans and the humanlike forms from primate ancestors; fossil hominids and the origin of modern Homo Sapiens. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey and examination of present-day human populations focusing upon adaptations in different environments and the interaction of culture and biology. General evolutionary theory is treated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Genetic, physiological, and cultural adaptations to environmental stress are discussed from the standpoint of their past evolutionary significance and their influence on contemporary human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 304. LEC
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The pros and cons of conflicting theories on the past and present evolution are examined. Race and intelligence, evolution of skin color, and genetic future of humans are among the considered topics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course is an introduction to the evolutionary study of human sexual behavior. Using an explicitly Darwinian framework, it examines the biological basis for human mate selection, male and female mating strategies, child-birth and child-care practices, parental care, marriage, and family structure. The power of Darwinian theory to predict human sexual behavior is tested in anthropological field studies, designed and carried out by students in the class. Class time is allocated for discussion of students' research as it progresses through each stage, and results are presented in the last weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: Introductory class in biology or biological anthropology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An evolutionary perspective on the behavior and biology of males and females in human society. Topics will include the evolution of sexual dimorphism, social and biological issues in human reproduction, primate social patterns, human sexual behavior and taboos, sex and social structure, and the sociobiology of sex. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 161. Not open to students who have had ANTH 161. LEC
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An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Emphasis on cultural-historical relationships and theories of cultural development and change. LEC
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This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as EALC 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC
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An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as EALC 364.) LEC
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Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as EALC 365.) LEC
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