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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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This course traces the history of the United States from the debates over the ratification of the Constitution until 1848. Major topics include the republican experiment, the Market Revolution, the Age of Jackson, religious revivals and reform, slavery and the cotton kingdom, the Manifest Destiny. Historians view the period as vital to understanding the development of the society, economy, culture, and politics of the modern United States. LEC
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The United States from the rise of sectional conflict through the disintegration and reunification of the Union. LEC
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The political, economic, social, and intellectual development of the United States from 1877 to 1920. LEC
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The complete Divine Comedy will be read in English translation, with equal stress on each of its three parts: the Inferno, the Purgatory, and the Paradise. No prerequisite. (Same as HWC 410.) LEC
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An introductory study of European economic and social history from the Tenth Century Crisis to the 1490s. This course investigates the causes of economic development and the interactions among market, nonmarket, and social institutions such as the family. Topics covered include trade, labor, technologies, consumerism, social unrest and the rise of social and economic thought. LEC
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Comparative urban study of Florence and Venice from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries. Principal subjects are the distinctive economies of the city-states, political developments, Renaissance humanism, patronage of the arts, family life, and foreign policy. LEC
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This course examines Mediterranean civilizations from the First Crusade to the Battle of Lepanto. Topics include the commercial revolution, medieval colonization, the Byzantine and Ottoman states, shipping and navigation, and the Atlantic. Equal coverage of the eastern and western Mediterranean. LEC
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A survey of the American experience in military conflict, both foreign and domestic, from the colonial period to the present. In addition to the strategic and tactical aspects of war, the course will treat the political, economic, and social effects in their national and global contexts. Extensive use will be made of audio-visual materials. LEC
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This course deals with the interactions between Cold War culture and domestic and international politics chiefly from the American and to some degree comparative perspective. It focuses on the period 1945-1975, and makes use of films, television, music, works of science fiction and related genres, and other cultural manifestations to examine such themes as programs of domestic and international repression, consensus politics, cultural imperialism, gender roles, and class, status, and racial dynamics in the context of what was perceived as bipolar rivalry. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the junior/senior level. course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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A history of the growth of suburban enclaves, from their emergence during the electric streetcar era to their dominance in the late 20th century. This short course features the analysis of class dynamics, racial exclusions, commuting, social conformity and the alienation of the young within a U.S. context, but some attention is given to comparisons with other parts of the world. LEC
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A history of the Midwestern metropolis from its origins as a swamp to an industrial port city. Topics covered in this short course may include the meat-packing industry, political corruption and reform, immigration and migration, the rise and demise of neighborhoods, transportation systems, working-class social movements, modern architecture and urban popular culture. LEC
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This short course examines the key theorists and organizers of the anarchist movement, beginning with its emergence in the 19th century and extending into its reappearance in the 21st century. It traces developments in Europe, South America, Asia and the United States. Topics may include the Paris Commune, credit unions, propaganda by the deed, wage slavery, resistance to authority, and the general strike. LEC
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This short course traces the evolution of work from pre-industrial times to the computerized workplace. Issues such as the meaning of work, dignity and respect, time efficiency and exploitation, unionization and strikes, workplace democracy, collectives and worker-owned businesses, laziness as a form of resistance to authority, leisure, the culture of commuting, and hierarchy and status are explored. The evolution of work in non-U.S. societies is analyzed comparatively. LEC
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This short course examines the history of the Cuban port city from the era of Spanish colonialism to the "special period" of shortages and deprivations during the 1990s. Topics covered may include popular culture, Caribbean pirates, cigar factories and labor, urban slavery, Chinatown, social revolution, restructuring of urban public space, suburban expansion, modernist architecture, tourism, gambling and vice, historical preservation and the changing conditions of streetlife. LEC
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An eight-week course devoted to a specific historical topic. May be repeated for credit as topics change. LEC
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This course offers a comparative assessment of the origins and practice of various forms of popular culture in the 20th Century in these two regions. Theories that explain the links between modernism and popular culture are discussed. Topics investigated may include the impact of spectacle on the urban environment, the legacies of colonialism in the sphere of culture, and the intersection of public space and popular culture. Forms such as music, cinema, street theater, and sports are explored. LEC
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May be taken more than once; total credit not to exceed six hours. Prerequisite: Approval of the Coordinator of the Honors Program of the Department of History. IND
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Investigation of a subject selected by the student with the advice and direction of an instructor. Individual reports and conferences. Two (2) Readings in History courses may be applied to the major and no more than one (1) may be applied to the minor. Prerequisite: Ten hours of college history including at least two upper-class courses and a "B" average in history. Consent of instructor. IND
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This course is designed to give students the opportunity to apply historical knowledge and ideas gained through course work to real-life situations in volunteer service agencies and community centers. Open to History majors and others with significant History backgrounds. Permission of instructor is required. LEC
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Required for students in the History major honors program, normally in the second semester of their honors projects. Prerequisite: Approval of the Coordinator of the Honors Program of the Department of History. Another seminar experience may be substituted, with the approval of the Honors Coordinator. LEC
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Brief history of writing materials and handwritten books; history of printed books from the 15th century as part of cultural history; technical progress and aesthetic change. Offered every second year. (Same as ENGL 520.) LEC
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Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as CLSX 502). LEC
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History of the rise of civilizations in the ancient Near East from the earliest time to the Muslim conquest of the early seventh century, including the areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Syria, Palestine and Asia Minor. An archaeological approach is used in focusing attention on the cultural phenomena and achievements of the peoples of these areas, including the Babylonians, Assyrians, Persians, ancient Israelites, Greeks and Romans. LEC
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An investigation of the history of Rome from its origins to the end of the Republic in 31 B.C.E., emphasizing political, social and economic aspects of the development of Rome from a minor city to a world power. LEC
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A political, social, and economic investigation of the early Roman Empire from Augustus to Diocletian emphasizing how Rome held together a world-empire until economic and military problems forced a complete reorganization of the imperial system. LEC
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An investigation and analysis of the later Roman Empire from Diocletian to Justinian, emphasizing the Christianization of the empire, its division into Western and Eastern/Byzantine Empires, and the barbarian invasions. LEC
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This course explores the origins, historical evolution, and global expansion of multinational corporations since the 1880s. Particular attention is devoted to U.S.-directed multinational businesses with both market-oriented and supply-oriented direct investments abroad and the competitive advantages gained by American capital, management, and marketing expertise vis-a-vis foreign firms operating in Canada, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. An objective of the course is to assist the student of international business in understanding, analyzing, and addressing various complex, interrelated and interdependent trends and issues in the world community that have had a critical impact on business performance in the international marketplace. LEC
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A study of a specialized theme or topic in History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
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The formation of a new civilization in Western Europe between the decline of the Roman Empire and the First Crusade is the central stress in this topical study of the institutions and ideas characteristic of the Latin West, 300-1100. LEC
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This course examines the development and evolution of the crusade as well as the history of the crusading movement from the 11th to the 15th centuries. Through an analysis of documents from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim perspectives, this course aims to consider "the Crusades" in the broadest possible context. One of the key questions to be addressed in this course is: how did these expeditions to the Holy Land both reflect and influence cross-cultural relations in the medieval Mediterranean World? LEC
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The civilization of Medieval Europe at its height (1100-1350); its subsequent disintegration and transformation. LEC
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This course will trace the development of the European intellectual tradition in the crucial period of the seventeenth century. Such topics as the changing views on religion, the decline of Humanism, and the rise of natural science form the center of the course and will be studied against the background of social and political change. Class sessions will consist of discussions of both primary and secondary sources. LEC
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A survey of economic, political, social, and cultural developments in Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries, with special attention to those elements in the life of the age which look forward to the modern world. LEC
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The Protestant revolt of the 16th century. LEC
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The Catholic or Counter-Reformation and the wars of religion, including the Thirty Years War. LEC
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An investigation of why the major states of Europe underwent a crisis at the end of the 1700s that culminated in a wave of democratic revolutions, reforms, and the wars of Napoleon. LEC
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A study of the origins, development, and impact of the French Revolution, beginning with a description of France in the 18th century and ending with a look at France under Napoleon. LEC
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A survey of the history of modern France. Beginning with an exploration of the impact of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic era on French institutions, politics, and society, this course examines the search for a viable political system, the acquisition of a colonial empire, the church-state controversy, and the rise of socialism in the nineteenth century, and considers the impact of two world wars on French society, the rapid modernization of countryside and cities, and French political leadership from Clemenceau to Blum to de Gaulle in the twentieth century. LEC
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A survey of the major political, economic, and social developments in Europe from the French Revolution to the outbreak of the First World War, exploring the impact of the "Dual Revolution" (French and Industrial) with which the century began and tracing the evolution of ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism in a century which brought Europe to the pinnacle of its power and influence. LEC
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A study of the issues and themes that have shaped the contemporary European world, exploring European politics, economy, and society from the zenith of Europe's power and influence at the turn of the century through two world wars and into the contemporary era. This survey begins with the period of consolidation of a system of major national states in western Europe and ends with the search for alternatives to that system in the break-up of empires and movements for European unity in the post-World War II era. The course also considers the emergence of the states of central and eastern Europe and examines the impact of the Russian Revolution and the Soviet state on European affairs. Not open to those who have credit in either HIST 435 or HIST 436. LEC
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An introductory study of European economic history from the Middle Ages to the 1980s. Investigates the sources of economic growth, and the interaction between economic forces and social institutions. Topics covered will include the rise of commerce, the agricultural and industrial revolutions, imperialism, the Great Depression, and European recovery after World War II. (Same as ECON 535.) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 142 and ECON 144. LEC
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A survey of significant currents of thought during this period. Attention to the problem of the relationship between ideas and the historical situation. LEC
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A survey of women's history in the United States that will consider women's roles as housewives, mothers, consumers, workers, and citizens in preindustrial, commercial, and early industrial America. (Same as AMS 510 and WGSS 510.) LEC
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A survey of women's history in the United States that will include radical and reform movements, the impact of war and depression, professionalization, immigration, women's work, and the biographies of leading figures in women's history. (Same as AMS 511 and WGSS 511.) LEC
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This course explores the connection between historical changes in the labor process and the occupational choices available to women in different countries. Through discussion and analyses of texts, students will evaluate the construction of a gendered division of work as shaped over time by economic, cultural, and political forces. The chronological and geographical focus may vary depending on the instructor. (Same as AMS 512 and WGSS 512.) LEC
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This course examines how women's roles and the family have changed in Europe from the early modern period to the present. It will consider the relation of women and the family to such cultural, social, and political changes as the Reformation, the French Revolution, middle class culture, industrialization, and the mass movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. LEC
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This course will trace the development of German intellectual, social, and political life from the revolutions of 1848 through the foundation of the Second Reich, the impact of World War I, and the rise and fall of Nazism, and will conclude with an examination of West and East Germany and reunification. LEC
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A study of the major political developments of early modern France, including absolutism, corporate institutions, and popular revolts, as well as an examination of the everyday life and beliefs of ordinary people. LEC
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An examination of the writing, ideas, and language of the major thinkers of the Enlightenment, including Diderot, Hume, Kant, Lessing, Rousseau, and Voltaire. LEC
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This course uses history, literature, and archaeology to contrast the development of Anglo-Saxon and Celtic societies, from the Iron Age to the Norman invasions. Topics covered include King Arthur, epics and sagas, Christianization, kingship, women, economic development, and Vikings. Format includes both lecture and discussion. LEC
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An introduction to the impact on the British Isles of the Reformation and Renaissance; the development of the Tudor state; Parliament; the Stuart monarchy; the Anglican counter-reformation; civil war; the Cromwellian experiment. LEC
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Survey of social, cultural, political, and economic developments with particular emphasis on interaction between Anglo-Norman/English and Celtic societies. LEC
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A study of Britain's recovery from civil war; state formation and national identity; ideological conflict; the Revolution of 1688; religion and secularization; social stability and commercial expansion; reform; threats to the state, and the American revolution; Britain's survival of the French Revolution; the breakdown of the ancient regime in 1828-32. LEC
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A history of mapmaking worldwide from its origins to the present day. Emphasis on maps as historical records of evolving civilizations and cultural landscapes and methods of study early maps. (Same as GEOG 519.) LEC
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This course will examine in depth the leading developments in European thought from the 1920's to the present. Topics will include: existentialism, philosophic hermeneutics, and postmodernism. LEC
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A study of the rise of modern Britain from the 1832 Reform Act, a major step on the path from aristocratic government to mass democratic politics. It covers the politics and society of the Victorian era, the extension of British influence overseas, the origins and social impact of two world wars, the creation of the Welfare State, the loss of Empire, and Britain's entry into Europe. LEC
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The development of the British Empire in the areas of white settlement, new African and Asian colonies, and spheres of influence--constitutional, diplomatic, and strategic problems. Special features of the Indian Empire. Transformation from empire to commonwealth. Results of passing of empire. LEC
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This course will examine the society and culture of Spain in the period known as "the Golden Age." Subjects that will receive attention include: rural and urban society, economic and political organization of the Spanish and American peoples in the early years of the conquest, the place of women in society, the social basis for "Golden Age" culture, and the debate over the "decline of Spain." LEC
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This course aims to assess the impact of more than seven centuries of Muslim, Christian, Jewish coexistence or convivencia on the Iberian peninsula between 400 and 1609 C.E. The first half of the course focuses on the position of Jews and Christians under both Visigothic and Muslim rule, while in the second half of the semester the focus shifts to the Christian kingdoms, looking at Muslim, Christian, and Jewish relations during the time of the Christian Reconquest. The course will conclude with an analysis of the events leading up to the expulsion of the conversos and moriscos (Jewish and Muslim converts to Christianity) in 1492 and 1609, respectively, and will also consider what these expulsions meant to contemporaries and the degree to which they were motivated by a desire to establish religious uniformity in the peninsula. LEC
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This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. LEC
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Similar in content to HIST 543. This course will offer an introduction to a number of classic works in British political thought, placed against their historical background. Close reading of selected texts will be combined with contextual analysis. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. LEC
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The peoples of East Central Europe under Hapsburg, Romanov, and German rule; the dissolution of the empires, independence and the role of the new states in the European balance of power; World War II, Soviet domination, and the recent role of East Central Europe in the Communist World. LEC
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This course will deal analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the theses of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from a perspective of the history of ideas. (Same as REL 558.) LEC
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This course deals analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from the perspective of the history of ideas. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. (Same as REL 559.) LEC
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This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior course work in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and POLS 561.) LEC
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Americans dramatically changed the natural world between 1900 and 2000. This course asks how transformed environments shaped the American experience during a century of technological innovation, democratic renewal, economic expansion, global conflict, and cultural pluralism. Topics include food and markets, energy and transportation, law and politics, protest and resistance, suburbanization, and environmentalism's fate in a global information era. (Same as EVRN 562.) LEC
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Explores both leading and dissident ideas that Americans have had about the natural world since 1900. Broad chronological periods are explored in some depth, including the Progressive Era, New Deal, Cold War, the Sixties, and the Reagan Eighties. The course uses articles and books, as well as visual and aural forms of communication. Commercial speech, as well as scholarly and literary works, are considered. (Same as EVRN 563.) Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or HIST 129, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Political, economic, social, cultural, and religious developments of Russia from the beginnings of the Russian state in the 9th Century through the 17th Century. LEC
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The influence of the West and Marxism upon the institutional structure and international position of Russia. LEC
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An intensive study of the transformation of medieval Muscovy into the Russian Empire; attention will focus on major economic, social, political, and intellectual trends, emphasizing classroom discussion and reading in sources. LEC
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This course begins with the influences in the Persian Gulf at the start of the 20th century (British and Ottoman), and with the emergence of rival powers (French and Russian), as well as with indigenous movements and conditions at the time. The development of the oil industry, which had its beginnings before World War I, will be traced to the present, as will the political, economic, and strategic changes that have occurred. LEC
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A course designed to provide an understanding of change and continuity in Russian history and society with an emphasis on the distinctive factors and characteristics of the peoples that led to the rise and fall of the Soviet Union. LEC
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A survey of the development and characteristics of the Middle East since Napoleon. Topics such as the significance of Islam, the impact of the West, and the effects of Russia's movement south are emphasized. In the 20th century the Arab/Israeli problem, the Persian Gulf, oil, and foreign policy interests are stressed. LEC
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An intensive study of developments and changes in the Middle East since World War II. Themes developed include the end of British and French ascendancy, fundamental transformation of the structure of Middle Eastern states and politics, oil and the energy crisis, American and Russian policies and interests, old and new problems--e.g., the Straits, Suez Canal, Kurds, the Persian Gulf. (Not closed to those who have taken HIST 569, nor is HIST 569 necessary for HIST 570.) No prerequisite. LEC
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The Northern frontier provinces of the Viceroyalty of New Spain from their exploration and occupation by Spain until their absorption by the United States. LEC
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The course will serve as a sequel to HIST 571, History of the Spanish Borderlands. It will discuss issues associated with the borderlands region after conquest and acquisition by the United States in 1848. Themes will include race relations, immigration, labor, economics, politics, and the environment. This course will be concerned with how the region was incorporated into the United States, and how this relationship is evolving throughout the twentieth century. It also discusses the notion of a borderlands region and whether or not this is a valid characterization. LEC
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The course will analyze the social, political, and economic problems of the Latin American nations from their independence to the Mexican Revolution (1910). Emphasis will be on the emergence and shaping of the new countries; their transition to modern industrializing societies; and the impact of this transition on Latin American society. LEC
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Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. (Same as AAAS 574.) LEC
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Mexican history from preconquest days to the contemporary period. LEC
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Study of internal development of Central American republics but with regional approach and consideration of Indian civilizations and colonial institutions as background. Prerequisite: HIST 120, HIST 121, or HIST 370. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the history of the major islands of the Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Hispaniola, and Barbados) in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include emergence of new independent states, international relations, foreign capital, revolution, dictatorship, and democracy. Emphasis is given to comparative economic and political systems. LEC
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The course treats the long-term effort of the South American nations to become urban industrial societies through economic development, emergence of modern pressure groups, improvement of human capital, and the fostering of a sense of national purpose and unity expressed in the participation of the whole population in all of the activities and benefits of life in society. LEC
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The history of Brazil from European discovery to the present with emphasis on social and economic change. Topics discussed will include the Indian, African, and European backgrounds, slave society, the frontier in Brazilian development, cycles of economic growth and regionalism, the role of foreign capital, industrial development, labor, urban problems, the military in government, and human rights. LEC
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A study of the changing economic conditions in Latin America from Colonial times through the Twentieth Century and the effect of these conditions on Latin American society. Emphasis will be on the major theoretical issues of development economics, patterns of growth, and suggested strategies for economic development. Analysis will center on changes in agriculture, industry, labor, finance, transportation and technology, urbanization, immigration, role of women, export and commerce, and foreign involvement. LEC
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Varying themes which explore issues relating to pre-modern modes of production, kinship structures, wealth and socio-political systems in agrarian societies, indigenous cultures, race, poverty, colonialism, transitions from traditional to modern social and political structures, underdevelopment, national identity, environmental decay, class conflict, women and health. The concept of the "third world" is discussed in its historical context and evaluated in its analytical usefulness for comparing the experiences of people across vast regions of the world. LEC
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Course covers the history of Japan from the prehistoric era through the ancient period (approximately 10,000 BC to 1200 AD). Topics examined include the rise of Japanese Civilization, state formation, early capitals, belief systems, courtly culture in the Heian period (794-1185), and daily life. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expressions. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC
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An intensive survey of China's traditional civilization and its history, with emphasis on the last centuries of imperial rule under the Sung, Yuan, Ming, and Ch'ing dynasties (to 1850). (Same as EALC 583.) LEC
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An intensive survey of China's history from the early 19th century to the present. Key topics include the decline of the traditional system, the rise of communism, the Maoist era, and the tensions of change and control in the 1980s and 1990s. (Same as EALC 584.) LEC
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Early modern Japan (16th to 19th century) examines the history, culture, and patterns of life during an era of rigid social control but artistic brilliance. After an historical overview of the period, students will explore topics including the social structure, travel, religion, thought, and the formation of traditional cultural forms such as Kabuki theater. (Same as EALC 587.) LEC
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This course provides an intensive survey of Japanese history from the arrival of Commodore Perry through the Pacific War. Social, economic, and political themes will be emphasized. Among the topics covered will be the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, Japanese imperialism, Taisho democracy, and wartime mobilization. (Same as EALC 588.) LEC
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This course provides an overview of Japanese history from the end of World War II to the present day. Among the topics covered will be the Allied Occupation, postwar politics and social change, the economic "miracle," popular culture, women and the family, crime and punishment, the educational system, and Japan's place in the world. (Same as EALC 589.) LEC
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This course examines the cultural history of Korea in periods prior to the 19th Century. Special attention is given to varying constructions of cultural value, heritage, and identity, together with the historically specific factors that engendered them. (Same as EALC 563.) LEC
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A survey of scholarship on food in the West and in East Asia, choosing works primarily by historians, but also by sociologists, geographers, and anthropologists. We consider how scholars have approached issues concerning food productions and consumption, what habits of eating reveal about daily life, and how and when food is embedded with historiography related to these topics, keeping in mind the famous maxim of the noted French gastronome Brillat-Savarin (d. 1826): "Tell me what you eat: I will tell you what you are." LEC
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This course will examine selected topics in Modern Korean history in the 19th and 20th centuries, with special emphasis on Korea's connections to China and Japan. (Same as EALC 593.) Prerequisite: A college-level course in East Asian history or culture, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course begins with a series of lectures on the main principles underlying Chinese social structure. The course then examines the application of those principles in legal cases. Students read legal cases in translation and argue them in class. (Same as EALC 594.) Prerequisite: A course in Chinese history. LEC
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This course investigates the construction of national identity in modern Japan by examining the historical experiences of groups marginalized by mainstream society. We will explore the pressures of conformity, the pervasiveness of social ostracism and the surprising diversity in Japanese society. Among the groups discussed will be indigenous peoples (the Ainu, Okinawans), the Korean minority, the outcast class (burakumin), the sick and disabled, the yakuza, and political activists. (Same as EALC 596.) LEC
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This course examines the historical development and characteristics of Japanese theater, with special attention to traditional theater and the genres of noh, kyogen, and kabuki in particular, tracing their origins in the pre-modern era and their continued performance today. To gain an understanding of the historical and artistic setting of these arts, lectures and readings will consider broader issues such as performance and ritual in religion and daily life, gender and representation, and folk theater. A portion of this class will include practical studies of theatrical forms including noh dance and kabuki music (shamisen). (Same as EALC 597.) LEC
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An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Graduate students will complete an additional project in consultation with the instructor. (Same as AAAS 598.) LEC
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This course will deal with the last fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. (Same as AAAS 590.) LEC
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