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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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A continuation of HEBR 210. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 210. LEC
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This course introduces students to the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. It includes basic biblical passages for students to translate into English and analyze. LEC
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This is a continuation of Hebrew 230. It continues the study of the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, and includes biblical texts for students to translate and analyze. Prerequisite: HEBR 230 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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An introduction to Hebrew literature from the nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. The emphasis is on the development of basic interpretive skills, as well as an understanding of basic literary movements, genres, and concepts of this period. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. LEC
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A course designed to improve oral, audio and writing proficiencies in Modern Hebrew through reading and discussion of poems, Israeli newspaper articles and other selected materials. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220, with a grade of "B" or better recommended, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Continued study in Modern Hebrew via poems, short stories, Israeli newspaper articles and electronic media. The course is designed to strengthen linguistic skills, enrich vocabulary and further the study of grammar and syntax. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 330, with a grade of "B" or better recommended or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Enhancement of oral proficiency in Hebrew at the intermediate level via guided discussions and communicative practices. Prerequisite: HEBR 330 or HEBR 340 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 200 or equivalent. IND
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An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. LEC
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An introduction to the study of history. The course will expose the student to the major issues and methods of historical study. This will be done through the study of a specific historical period or topical area. In the study of this period or topic, students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as EVRN 103.) LEC
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An introduction to important historical developments in Africa mainly south of the Sahara. Topics will include early history, empires, kingdoms, and city-states, the slave trade, southern Africa, partition and colonialism, the independence era, military and civilian governments, and liberation movements. Approaches will include literature, the visual arts, politics, economics, and geography. (Same as AAAS 105.) LEC
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A general survey of the political, social, and economic developments of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Asia Minor, and Greece from Paleolithic times to 323 B.C. LEC
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A general survey of the political, social, and economic developments of ancient Rome from 753 B.C. to 475 A.D. LEC
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This course covers the history of the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome with emphasis on the origins of agriculture, writing, cities, empires, and democracy. Students will be introduced to schemes of interpretation, critical readings, and analysis, primary sources, and evaluation of evidence. LEC
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The history of Europe from the Barbarian Invasions to the beginning of the 16th century. LEC
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This course will introduce students to the concepts, issues, and methods of historical study, at the same time as it explores the main processes and events which shaped the history of Britain and its imperial dependencies. Students will be introduced to the nature and validity of different historical interpretations, and to the purpose and merit of historical writings. LEC
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An introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the cultural, political, economic, and social processes and events which helped to shape the modern world: The renaissance, the rise of the nation states, the Reformation, absolutism, and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution. Not open to students who have taken HIST 114. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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An introduction to early modern European history, with emphasis on the cultural, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to shape the modern world. The renaissance, the rise of nation states, the Reformation, absolutism and constitutionalism, the Enlightenment, and the coming of the French Revolution. LEC
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An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: the French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war, and its aftermath. LEC
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An introduction to recent European history, with emphasis on the social, political, economic, and cultural forces which have helped to create the Europe of today: The French Revolution, the romantic movement, the revolutions of 1848, nationalism, imperialism, Communism, and two World Wars, the cold war and its aftermath. Not open to students who have taken HIST 115. This Honors course is a Humanities Historical Studies Principal Course. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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A survey of the evolution of Russia from its origins to the present. The focus will be on the interaction of government and society and on internal and external pressures affecting modernization and reform, revolution, and territorial expansion. LEC
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A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Not open to students with credit in upper division East Asian history. LEC
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A survey of the history of China, Japan, Korea, and other cultures in East Asia from premodern to modern times. Students are introduced to the major currents of East Asian history and historical methods used to study them. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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The principal focus is on the evolution and analysis of societies, economies, and religions of native American peoples, the impact of Spanish and Portuguese conquests and settlement, government, trade and culture upon native civilizations, the influence of African population and culture, and the creole nature of the resulting society in the colonial period. Changes in the society and economy which presaged the movements for independence are also discussed. LEC
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Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform or revolution in the 20th Century. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. In this way the course deals with interpretations of the processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. LEC
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The principal focus is on the evolution and analysis of societies, economies, and religions of native American peoples, the impact of Spanish and Portuguese conquests and settlement, government, trade and culture upon native civilizations, the influence of African population and culture, and the creole nature of the resulting society in the colonial period. Changes in the society and economy which presaged the movements for independence are also discussed. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Similar in content to HIST 121. Students are introduced to historical analysis within the context of the emergence of national identities and the process of modernization in the region. The course compares social, cultural, economic, and political changes across a variety of countries since 1810, giving particular attention to the legacies of colonialism. It also discusses key processes such as urbanization and industrialization and examines social movements for reform and revolution in the 20th century. In this way the course deals with interpretations of these processes and movements and major issues of Latin American historiography. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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A historical survey of the United States from the peopling of the continent through the Civil War. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. LEC
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A historical survey of the American people from Reconstruction to the present. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events that shaped American history. LEC
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A historical survey of the United States from the peopling of the continent through the Civil War. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. Not open to students who have taken HIST 128. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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A historical survey of the American people from Reconstruction to the present. This survey is designed to reflect the diversity of the American experience, to offer the student a chronological perspective on the history of the United States, and to explore the main themes, issues, ideas, and events which shaped that history. Not open to students who have taken HIST 129. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of department. LEC
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Surveys the Western scientific tradition from roots in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Greece to the Scientific Revolution in seventeenth-century Europe. Focuses on the theoretical, methodological, and institutional development of the physical and bio-medical sciences. Addresses interactions of science with the technological, religious, philosophical, and social dimensions of Western culture. LEC
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Surveys the history of science from the seventeenth century to the present with study of the changing theoretical, institutional, and social character of the scientific enterprise. Addresses physical, biological, and social sciences with attention to the chemical revolution at the turn of the nineteenth century, evolutionary biology, the new physics of the early twentieth century, and the professionalization of social science. Relates scientific changes to historical developments in technology, religion, national traditions in Europe and the USA, and non-Western cultures. LEC
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This course treats West African history through the first part of the 20th century. The student is provided with a perspective on the major historical patterns that gave rise to West Africa's development as an integral part of world history. Special attention is paid to anthropological geographical, and technological developments that influenced West African political and socioeconomic changes. (Same as AAAS 160.) LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in History at the freshman/sophomore level. course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. (Same as AAAS 305.) LEC
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This course introduces students to the practice and methods of the study of history and serves as the gateway to the major. Students learn (1) to think historically; (2) to understand how historians construct and write about the past through narratives, theory and analytical discussion; (3) to critically evaluate historical arguments and the material used to substantiate those arguments, including an introduction to the process of peer review; (4) to develop writing and research skills including the interpretation of primary sources; and (5) to master professional standards of presenting their findings. This course is required of all history majors and is a prerequisite for HIST 696 Seminar in:________. Prerequisite: Open only to declared History majors or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces students to the practice and methods of the study of history and serves as the gateway to the major. Students learn (1) to think historically; (2) to understand how historians construct and write about the past through narratives, theory and analytical discussion; (3) to critically evaluate historical arguments and the material used to substantiate those arguments, including an introduction to the process of peer review; (4) to develop writing and research skills including the interpretation of primary sources; and (5) to master professional standards of presenting their findings. This course, or HIST 301 - its non-honors equivalent, is required of all history majors and is a prerequisite for HIST 696 Seminar in:________. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program who are declared History majors, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course offers a comparative global introduction to the history of the modern city by looking at the ways in which certain metropoli developed an attractive underbelly of decadence at the same time as they sought to be centers of refined and orderly cosmopolitan life. The course examines topics such as popular culture, gambling, prostitution, crime, violence, nightlife, tourism, and corruption in the context of the increased social mobility that characterized the beginning of the industrial age and that has extended into the 21st century. Students investigate the changing relation between work and leisure, spectacle and consumerism, and urban space and the struggle for order. LEC
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Explains and analyzes the three revolutions in the English-speaking world which, more than any others, are held to have laid the foundations of modernity. Themes discussed include social, intellectual, and political developments, structures, and conflicts. 1642 and 1688 are treated in the setting of England's relations with Scotland and Ireland, and against the background of European wars of religion. 1776 is analyzed in a transatlantic context as a civil war within the wider British polity. LEC
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Describes and analyzes the factors producing a Scientific Revolution in early-modern Europe. Focuses on fundamental changes in astronomy-cosmology, physics, and biology from Copernicus to Newton. Examines the emergence of experimental method as an essential part of Western science. Portrays the development of new forms of scientific organization and the cultural frameworks that bore and shaped them. Surveys the various interpretations of this period expressed by current historians of science. LEC
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Analyzes the institutional, social, technological, and political circumstances of science in the Western tradition. Examines the place of science in pre-modern European settings. Emphasizes the shifting centers of national scientific prominence since the seventeenth century from Italy to Britain to France to Germany to the USA. LEC
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An intensive version of HIST 300. A survey of social, political, and economic developments during the colonial era and independence struggles, followed by a closer examination of the contemporary experience in a selected country or region. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by consent of the instructor. (Same as AAAS 307.) LEC
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A comparative historical analysis of major global developments from the late 15th century to the present. Some of the themes likely to be explored are empire-building, contact between cultures and colonial social relations; the attraction of cities, their role in a global economy and the shift to an urban world; and the impact of capitalism and industrialization on social organization including conflict between classes and changes in the nature of work. Students learn ways of interpreting primary historical documents and comparing historical investigations across time and space. Not open to students who have completed HIST 100. LEC
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Birth of modern chemical science from roots in Greek natural philosophy, alchemy, Renaissance medicine, and technology. The Chemical Revolution of Lavoisier and Dalton. Maturity of chemistry in the19th and 20th centuries, along with an examination of the growth of chemical institutions and the rise of chemical industry. Emphasis on developments from the 18th century to the present. (Same as CHEM 309.) LEC
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An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from the initial European settlements to 1876. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music, and the visual arts, this course will investigate patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as AMS 310.) Prerequisite: AMS 100 or AMS 110 or HIST 128. LEC
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This course examines the lives of selected great scientists. Lectures and biographical readings deal with scientists who lived in the period between the seventeenth century and the present. Through comparative biography, the course assesses the theoretical, methodological, institutional, and social development of modern science. LEC
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An examination of the major historical shifts, trends, and conflicts that have shaped the multicultural nature of life in the United States from 1877 to the present. In addition to tracing developments in literature, architecture, drama, music and the visual arts, this course investigates patterns and changes in the popular, domestic, and material culture of everyday life in America. (Same as AMS 312.) LEC
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The theme of conspiracy is a recurring motif in American history. This course uses a case-study method to revisit episodes such as the Salem witch trials, the movement against freemasonry, the Slave Power conspiracy, and more recent obsessions such as UFOs and the assassination of John F. Kennedy to explain why so many Americans have embraced conspiracy theories to explain mysterious events and dramatic social change. The course will rely on primary accounts, fiction, and film, as well as secondary historical literature, to examine both "real" and "imaginary" conspiracies and their effects on the politics, culture, and society of the United States. LEC
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Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 315. LEC
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Explores the rise of global capitalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, contemporary debates about 21st century globalization, and the role of globalization in our everyday lives. Questions considered include: Is globalization an incremental process that has been going on for centuries, or it is a dramatic new force reshaping the post-Cold War world? Is it a cultural and social process or an economic and political one? Or is it all of these things? Not open to students who have completed HIST 314. Open only to students in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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This interdisciplinary course covers the history of African American women, beginning in West and Central Africa, extending across the Middle Passage into the Americas, and stretching through enslavement and freedom into the 21st century. The readings cover their experiences through secondary and tertiary source materials, as well as autobiographies and letters, plays and music, and poems, novels, and speeches. (Same as AAAS 317, AMS 317, and WGSS 317.) LEC
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This survey course explores the history of being female in America through a focus on the ways differences in race, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and life cycle have shaped various aspects of women's lives. Themes to be explored could include, but are not limited to: social and political activism; intellectual developments; family; women's communities; work; sexuality; and culture. LEC
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This course examines the social, cultural, and political contexts of women's spirituality and their relations to gender relations in Europe from about 30,000 B.C.E. to the 16th century Protestant Reformation. Lectures move both chronologically and topically, covering such subjects as goddess-worshiping cultures, women's roles in Christian and Jewish societies, symbols of women, and male attitudes toward women. Students will be able to participate in weekly discussions of primary and secondary source readings about women. (Same as WGSS 320.) LEC
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This survey of women's history in Europe looks at changing patterns of women's economic roles and family structures in preindustrial and industrial society, the importance of women in religious life, cultural assumptions underlying gender roles, and the relationship of women to political movements, including the rise of feminism. (Same as WGSS 321.) LEC
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A general survey of the development of medieval ideas and their expression in religion, learning, literature, and the arts. Weekly lectures must be supplemented by preceptorial sections on special aspects of medieval culture, which cooperating professors will offer as reading courses in their several departments. Thus, a student might take the general lecture course for two credit hours of history and supplement it with one credit hour of readings in art history or French Gothic architecture. The lectures will treat four major topics: the rise of Christianity; Byzantine and Moslem civilization; Latin scholastic learning; and vernacular literature. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HIST 323. LEC
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An intensive reading course in a particular aspect of the civilization and culture of Medieval Western Europe. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HIST 322. LEC
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This course examines different notions about women and their bodies from a historical perspective. It discusses the arguments and circumstances that have shaped women's lives in relation to their bodies, and women's responses to those arguments and circumstances. This course covers a wide geographical and chronological spectrum, from Ancient societies to the present, from Latin America and the Middle East, to North America and Western Europe. (Same as WGSS 324.) LEC
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A broad historical study of the Spanish Inquisition from 1478 to its afterlife in modern culture, including its use in political debates and its depiction in popular culture. Topics include anti-Semitism, the nature of the inquisitorial investigation, the use of torture, censorship and the relationship between the Inquisition, the Spanish monarchy and other religious and lay authorities. Taught in English. Will not count toward the Spanish major. (Same as SPAN 302.) LEC
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The societies, economies, and cultures of Native American peoples in Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and the Southwestern United States will provide the main focus of this course to understand the culture and values of those who preceded the Europeans in the Americas. European culture is also examined, including the motivations for exploration and conquest. The details of the particular conquests and how they affected the resulting composite society will also be discussed, using contemporary eye-witness accounts, films recreating the action, and modern accounts. LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, and San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war, and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as EURS 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
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A study of forces giving rise to riots, rebellions, and revolution in Western Europe from 1600-1790. The course will examine social and ideological aspects of famine, religious persecution, taxation, war, landlord-peasant relations, and the increasing power of kings. LEC
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This course offers a comparative history of the European (Portuguese, Spanish, French, English, and Dutch) colonization of the Americas. It examines the interaction among peoples and cultures across the Atlantic, from the age of European exploration to the start of the independence movements in the Americas. Themes that will receive special attention include: comparing patterns of colonization, the forging of American societies of European, Native American, and African cultures, the slave trade, and the history of sugar production. LEC
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This course investigates the interrelated symbols of the European metropolis during the "Age of Great Cities", from the filth of the sewers to the "filthiness" of prostitution. Students investigate gender and class in the metropolis by exploring a few stereotypes: the juvenile delinquent, the woman on the street, and the flaneur. The course format stresses discussion of common texts, including short readings of literature from the period and historical scholarship. Students also analyze contemporary photographs, art, architecture, and advertising. LEC
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A historical survey of the causes, course, and consequences of the conflict, 1878-1919, stressing its socio-economic dimensions as well as its political ramifications and military aspects. Considerable use will be made of visual aids. No prerequisites. LEC
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A survey of the origins, course, and consequences of the war, 1930-1945. Political, economic, military, and social aspects will be dealt with in the context of their global effects. Extensive use will be made of motion pictures and other media. LEC
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An examination of the rise of Hitler and Nazism, beginning with the breakdown of 19th century culture in the First World War and continuing through the failure of democracy under the Weimar Republic. The course will also discuss the impact of Nazism on Germany and how Nazism led to the Second World War and the Holocaust. LEC
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The course covers: (a) Marxism and Marxist parties in Western Europe and Russia to 1914; the development of the Stalinist system in the Soviet Union to 1939; Soviet foreign policy in peace and war; the imposition of Stalinist Communism and Soviet domination on Eastern Europe after World War II; post-1945 Soviet and Eastern European Communist regimes, dissidents in the U.S.S.R. and Eastern Europe, and Eastern European opposition movements; Gorbachev and the collapse of Communist governments in Eastern Europe and U.S.S.R. in 1989-91; (b) the history of Communist and neo-Communist states, their policies and problems in Asia, the Caribbean and Central America, also Africa, the Middle East and Afghanistan. LEC
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The systematic murder of the Jews of Europe by the Nazis during World War II is one of the most important events of modern history. This course studies the Holocaust by asking about its place in history. It will compare other attempted genocides with the Holocaust and examine why most historians argue that it is unique. Other topics covered will include why the Holocaust occurred in Europe when it did, the changing role of anti-Semitism, and what the effects of the Holocaust on civilization have been. It will also discuss why some people have sought to deny the Holocaust. The course will conclude by discussing the questions people have raised about the Holocaust and such issues as support for democracy, the belief in progress, the role of science, and the search for human values which are common to all societies. LEC
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The famine in Ireland between 1845 and 1849, in which an estimated one million people died, was a turning point in Irish history, and an important event in British and American history. This course focuses on the Great Hunger, its origins and consequences. The main themes examined will be the political and economic impact of the Act of Union (1801) between Ireland and England; the patterns of Irish trade, landholding and agriculture; the role of the "splendiferous spud," the mass starvation of the 1840's; the English response to famine; and the demographic effect of famine and emigration (to Canada and the United States). The course will also look at famine in other British possessions, notably India, and it will confront both the charge of genocide against the English, and the famine's contribution to Irish myth and memory. LEC
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An analysis of the experiences of the American people during the Great Depression. Attention will also be given to the global dimensions of the crisis, socioeconomic dislocation, cultural and institutional change, and the impact of the Asian and European wars. LEC
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Law and lawyers have powerfully shaped American values and institutions. This course explores law's impact on American society from the age of European colonization through present. Topics include liberty, public order, race and ethnicity, the family, property, speech, environment, and self-government. The course also examines the changing images of lawyers and the law over time. Course materials include not just statutes and court decisions, but literature, imagery, and popular culture materials. LEC
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A survey of changes in the landscape and in people's perceptions of the natural world from 1500 to present. Topics include agroecology, water and energy, the impact of capitalism, industrialism, urbanization, and such technologies as the automobile, and the origins of conservation. (Same as EVRN 347.) LEC
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A survey of culture and society in Kansas from prehistory to the present. Topics include Native American life, Euro-American resettlement, Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War, agricultural settlement, urbanization and industrialization, depression and recovery, and modern Kansas in transition. Emphasis in the course will be on social and economic conditions, the experience of ethnic and racial groups, inter-racial relations, and the role of women. LEC
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An examination of the origins, pattern of development, and legacy of this still unsettled conflict, which in many ways set the tone for the entire post-1945 era of the Cold War. Points of emphasis will include the motives and policies of the major participants (Koreans, Americans, Chinese, and Soviets), as well as the effects of the war on their domestic politics and foreign policy positions. LEC
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This course surveys the history of the first peoples to inhabit North America from prehistory to present. Commonly and collectively referred to as American Indians, indigenous peoples include a diverse array of nations, chiefdoms, confederacies, tribes, and bands, each of which has its own unique cultures, economies, and experiences in dealing with colonial and neocolonial powers. This class seeks to demonstrate this diversity while at the same time providing an understanding of the common struggle for political and cultural sovereignty that all indigenous nations face. Indigenous nations that have developed a relationship with the United States will receive primary focus, but comparative reference will be made to First Nations of Canada. LEC
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The interaction and significant confrontations between science and religion will be considered together with the religious responses to science and technology. LEC
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This course surveys the history of the tropical environment and its peoples from Europe's first encounter to today's ecotourism boom. It focuses on portrayals of the tropics in historical travel accounts and films. Through these sources, we seek to understand how science, technology, and tourism have been used, in turn, as instruments of progress and destruction, tools of empire and national liberation. Case studies are drawn from Latin America, Africa, Oceania, and Asia. LEC
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This course explores the political, social and cultural system of early modern France. It culminates with study of the collapse of monarchy and establishment of republican government during the French Revolution. LEC
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This course will study the structure and dynamics of colonialism and neo-colonialism in the third world beginning in the 19th Century and continuing to the 1980s. It will also examine responses to these systems, from small-scale resistance to nationalist revolutions. Attention will be given to the relationship between ideology and collective behavior. Case studies will be drawn from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the twentieth century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. LEC
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This course explores themes such as the evolution of national identities, the conflict between the city and the countryside, exile, the surrealist imagination and the cultural resistance against foreign influences through an examination of the literature, film, art, music, religions and popular and material culture of 19th and 20th century Latin America. LEC
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This course treats the history of Latin America since the European conquest through the prism of violence and social conflict. It traces the roots of the region's social collapse during the 20th century to political and cultural factors in the colonial and early national periods. Using films and literature in addition to historical texts, the course discusses the sources of nationalism, civil wars, banditry, urbanization, violent dissent, military dictatorships, human rights abuses, and guerrilla insurgencies as well as the political uses of violence made by different social groups. Not open to students who have taken HIST 370. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Historical study of the interpretation of the religion clauses of the First Amendment with special reference to the questions of establishment, the free exercise of religion, freedom of religious belief, worship, and action, and religion and the public schools. Not open to freshmen. (Same as REL 373.) LEC
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Historical study of the interpretation of the religion clauses of the First Amendment with special reference to the questions of establishment, the free exercise of religion, freedom of religious belief, worship, and action, and religion and the public schools. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of the instructor. (Same as REL 375.) LEC
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This course investigates through film, literature, memoirs, photography, architecture, and scholarship the experience of ordinary citizens under Soviet-style communism in Eastern Europe. We study the ways people supported, resisted, opposed, and merely got by under state socialism from the late 1940s to the collapse of Communism in 1989. LEC
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A survey of the political, social, economic and cultural transformation of Europe in a century of turmoil, from the Old Regime through the liberal and national revolts of 1848, the Paris Commune and the Russian Revolution. LEC
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For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program. This course examines some of the main events and trends in British history, from the earliest times to recent British history. The specific historical themes investigated will depend upon the instructor. The course can be taken only via enrollment in the KU British Summer Institute in the Humanities. Prerequisite: Approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC
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A study of a specialized theme or topic in History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
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This course introduces the history of major nomadic powers in Eurasian Steppe and their impact in the world from the first Millennium BCE to around 1500 AD. The main topics include the culture of the Scythians, the Hun and Xiongnu confederacy, the Mongol conquest, and the Turkish empires in Central and West Asia. It investigates the natural and human forces that shape the identities of the nomads and their changing images in history. LEC
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A comprehensive introduction to the cultural influence and material exchange among major civilizations along the Silk Road. It covers the period of more than one thousand years between the 2nd and the 15th centuries CE, during which time forces wielded by the Persians, the Chinese, the Indians, the Tibetans and the Mongols shaped the geopolitical landscape of the vast region that spreads from the Caspian Sea to the Gobi Desert. Students explore the role of the Silk Road in the formation of the religious and ethnic identities of these civilizations, as well as their perceptions towards one another. Along with textual materials, the course uses extensive visual and musical materials to present interesting phenomena, such as Sogdian burial practice, Arab accounts of Tang China, Nestorial Christianity at the Mongol court, and Marco Polo's journey to the East. The course begins and concludes with discussion of the contemporary significance of the Silk Road as a historical category. LEC
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This course on China's Communist revolution considers the evolution of Maoism, or Chinese Communism, from its ideological origins through its implementation during and after the Chinese Communist revolution. It examines major Maoist movements such as Land Reform, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the cult of Mao. It further considers the globalization of Maoism by examining examples of other Maoist revolutions and revolutionaries in places like Cambodia, Peru, and Nepal. LEC
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This course provides a foundation for study of Japanese history. It combines lectures on the scope of Japanese history over the past 2,000 years with discussions of topics key to the development of Japanese civilization such as religion and literature. We analyze how different media, such as film, Japanese animation (anime), and art can be used as historical sources, and how these shape our understanding of Japan. Students hone their ability to analyze both thematic and historical questions through writing assignments and discussions. LEC
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Japan's warrior class, the samurai, dominated politics and society for more than half of Japan's recorded history. This course traces the history of the samurai from their origins to the dissolution of their class in 1877, examining their military role, philosophy, and cultural contributions. It also considers continued references to the "spirit of the samurai" in the twentieth century. LEC
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Examination of a limited aspect of a general subject; other aspects of the same subject may be offered other semesters. LEC
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The Defense of the Roman Frontiers. This course emphasizes the development of the frontiers of the Roman empire from Caesar to the late second century. It includes the origins of the Germans and their society, the Celtic background, and the relationship between the emperor and the army. LEC
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An examination of the role of technology and its influence on society. The historical development of technology will be traced up to modern times with an emphasis on its relations to the humanities. Attention will be given to the future of different branches of technology and alternative programs for their implementation. (Same as ENGR 304.) LEC
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Traces the evolution of a scientific tradition in American culture. Examines the growth of scientific ideas and institutions under European and indigenous influences. Studies the interactions of science with technological, theological, political, and socio-economic developments. LEC
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This course will focus on the meaning the American Revolution had for different groups of Americans. Particular emphasis will be on the relationship between ideology and experience, and the impact of the Revolution on such groups as women, slaves, Indians, African-Americans, the poor, merchants, and loyalists. LEC
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