All schools & programs >

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

Show courses in CLAS with a course number to
worth in .

There are 3,453 results.

This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the Junior/Senior level. course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and non-business majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as IBUS 305.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
European Studies majors will do research and write a substantial paper on a topic in the culture, economy, history, or politics of Europe. Topics will be approved by the European Studies Committee. Students will work with an adviser chosen from among the European Studies faculty and with the European Studies Coordinator. The majority of the students' work will be done independently with their advisers, but students will meet with the European Studies Coordinator several times as a class to report on their progress and present their final drafts. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500 and 15 hours toward the Co-Major. IND
View current sections...
Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND
View current sections...
This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC
View current sections...
A multidisciplinary study of selected literary, scholarly, and creative works produced by those Europeans forced into exile, emphasizing their impact on culture and society both in Europe and in those countries in which the exiles resided. Examples: exile during the Nazi dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945), during Cold War crises (Berlin 1960, Prague 1968). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary overview of the Cold War period (1945-1985) focusing on Western European dimensions of the problem, based on the view that the Cold War structured political institutions, cultures, and societies in enduring ways that continue to be relevant today. LEC
View current sections...
This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND
View current sections...
Artists and intellectuals in their relation to state and society. This course is designed to introduce students (1) to the role European artists and intellectuals have often played in the arena of politics and (2) to the privileged place cultural production (arts, literature, media) occupies in the formation of various European identities and economies. LEC
View current sections...
Social, historical, and economic study of Southern European societies with emphasis on modern period. Relevant to the study of European integration and EU enlargement. Consideration of the distinctive southern Mediterranean societies from the perspective of their collective identity as a regional economic and geopolitical bloc. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking Age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as SCAN 570.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 144. LEC
View current sections...
A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as PCS 565.) LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The European Union, the union of 27 European countries, is a culmination of a long history of European unity. The European Union now encompasses population and economic strength rivalling that of the United States. This course examines selected topics in the history of European integration and the political, legal, economic, and social implications of the present European Union as well as its relations with the United States and other regions of the world. LEC
View current sections...
Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as HIST 103.) LEC
View current sections...
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. (Same as GEOG 148.) LEC
View current sections...
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of EVRN 148, designed for superior students. (Same as GEOG 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to geographic approaches to the study of the environment, emphasizing societal and cultural factors that influence human interaction with the biosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere. The course involves analysis of a broad range of contemporary environmental issues from the local to global scales. (Same as GEOG 150.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Environmental Studies. course work must be arranged through the Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of current methods of describing and modeling the function, structure, and productivity of natural and anthropogenically modified earth resource systems, along with a discussion of contemporary views of what constitutes a natural landscape. Fundamental natural science principles about the interplay among lithospheric, atmospheric, hydrospheric, and biospheric components of earth systems are emphasized. Uses of natural resources, including fossil fuels, minerals, and water, are described with attention to the earth's total energy budget. Human activities that affect preservation, conservation, and multiple uses of earth regions receive attention. Systems under stress through population and other contemporary forces serve as examples. (Same as GEOG 304.) LEC
View current sections...
An historical and analytical study of the formulation, implementation, and consequences of environmental policy in the United States. Attention will be directed at relevant interest groups, issues specific to both rural and urban populations, relationships between national policies and international organizations concerned with environmental problems. Prerequisite: EVRN 148/GEOG 148; and EVRN 103/HIST 103, EVRN 347/HIST 347 or EVRN 150/GEOG 150. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to how the American legal process improves, transforms, and damages the natural environment. Emphasizes and compares shifting responsibilities of legal forces and institutions: judges and litigants, legislators and statutes, agencies and administrations, and citizens and regulated entities. Prerequisite: EVRN 148 and EVRN 103/HIST 103, EVRN 347/HIST347 or EVRN 150/GEOG 150. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of changes in the landscape and in people's perceptions of the natural world from 1500 to present. Topics include agroecology, water and energy, the impact of capitalism, industrialism, urbanization, and such technologies as the automobile and the origins of conservation. (Same as HIST 347.) LEC
View current sections...
This course examines how human relationships with the biophysical world are politicized. Examines key contributions to debates surrounding environmental security, resource conflicts, and related issues, as well as geopolitical assumptions on which these debates build. (Same as GEOG 371.) LEC
View current sections...
This course invites students to study society and its impact on the environment. Environmental problems are social problems. This course will address such items as social paradigms, theories, inequalities, movements, and research. (Same as SOC 385.) LEC
View current sections...
Focuses on applications of geospatial technologies to environmental issues using case study examples and data, and provide students with a foundational skill-set in geographic information systems, remote sensing, and GPS techniques. Prerequisite: EVRN/GEOG 148/149; EVRN/HIST 103, EVRN/GEOG 150 or EVRN/HIST 347. LEC
View current sections...
Courses on special topics in Environmental Science and/or Policy. These courses may be lecture, discussions, or readings. Students may enroll in more than one interest group but may enroll in a given interest group only once. LEC
View current sections...
Though natural factors are introduced, this course focuses primarily on the human factors that contribute to global water scarcity. This course also discusses the consequences of water scarcity and its effects on society. Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides undergraduate students with practical experience in field data collection techniques and laboratory data analysis methods. During the first half of the semester, students work in the field using a variety of methods to measure such vegetation characteristics as: cover, density, biomass, leaf area, and canopy architecture. Students gain experience in the use of field instruments including a spectoradiometer, and techniques for quantifying biophysical attributes of vegetation. During the later part of the course, students learn to summarize their field data and examine relationships between the vegetation attributes and measurements made using remote sensing instruments. Recommended: GEOG 316 or an introductory statistics equivalent. (Same as GEOG 433.) FLD
View current sections...
Provides practical experience in the characterization of a diversity of ecosystem types; lakes, streams, forests, and prairies. This course is writing intensive, and designed for Environmental Studies majors. Prerequisite: EVRN/GEOG 148/149; EVRN/HIST 103, EVRN/HIST 347 or EVRN/GEOG 150; Junior Standing. Restricted to declared Environmental Studies majors. FLD
View current sections...
Supervised practical experience in a specific environmental area of interest. The adviser will schedule regular meetings to evaluate progress and provide assistance. A written summary of the internship experience and evaluation will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the adviser. Total credit may not exceed 8 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of program director. Restricted to declared Environmental Studies majors. Restricted to students with a 2.5 overall GPA or above. FLD
View current sections...
Introduction to study of the environment through air photos and satellite imagery, including principles of remote sensing, interactions of electromagnetic energy with the atmosphere and earth's surface, aerial photography, satellite systems, and sensors (electro-optical, thermal, and radar). Emphasis in the latter part of the course is on such applications as global monitoring, land cover mapping, forestry, agriculture, and oceanography. Laboratory emphasizes visual interpretation of aerial photography and satellite imagery and an introduction to digital image processing in the department's NASA Earth Science Remote Sensing Laboratory. (Same as GEOG 526.) Prerequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent. GEOG 358 recommended. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of environmental justice, both as a social movement and as a public policy initiative. Environmental justice examines the distribution of environmental externalities across different socio-economic and racial groups. We will discuss several different public policy areas that have been impacted by the environmental justice movement: hazardous waste facility siting, urban redevelopment and Brownfields, transportation policy, and Native American sovereignty. We will also touch upon international environmental policy in an environmental justice context. Throughout the course we will evaluate empirical issues in studying environmental justice. (Same as POLS 528.) Prerequisite: POLS 306, or a statistics class, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Course will involve lectures and discussion of Ethnobotany - the mutual relationship between plants and traditional people. Research from both the field of anthropology and botany will be incorporated in this course to study the cultural significance of plant materials. The course has 7 main areas of focus: 1) Methods in Ethnobotanical Study; 2) Traditional Botanical Knowledge - knowledge systems, ethnolinguistics; 3) Edible and Medicinal Plants of North America (focus on North American Indians); 4) Traditional Phytochemistry - how traditional people made use of chemical substances; 5) Understanding Traditional Plant Use and Management; 6) Applied Ethnobotany; 7) Ethnobotany in Sustainable Development (focus on medicinal plant exploration by pharmaceutical companies in Latin America). (Same as ANTH 582.) Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 108, EVRN 148, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of the theory and empirical practice of economic analysis as it applies to environmental issues. Topics include externalities (a type of market failure), the valuation of nonmarket goods, the practice of benefit-cost analysis, and the efficiency and cost effectiveness of pollution control policies. Most importantly, the course permits students to perform economic field research, using state-of-the-art techniques in a manner accessible to undergraduate students. (Same as ECON 550.) Prerequisite: ECON 104, ECON 140, or ECON 142. LEC
View current sections...
This course compares environmental politics and policies across a number of countries, including those in North America, Western Europe, East Asia, and Latin America. (Same as POLS 553.) LEC
View current sections...
Americans dramatically changed the natural world between 1900 and 2000. This course asks how transformed environments shaped the American experience during a century of technological innovation, democratic renewal, economic expansion, global conflict, and cultural pluralism. Topics include food and markets, energy and transportation, law and politics, protest and resistance, suburbanization, and environmentalism's fate in a global information era. (Same as HIST 562.) LEC
View current sections...
Explores both leading and dissident ideas that Americans have had about the natural world since 1900. Broad chronological periods are explored in some depth, including the Progressive Era, New Deal, Cold War, the Sixties, and the Reagan Eighties. The course uses articles and books, as well as visual and aural forms of communication. Commercial speech, as well as scholarly and literary works, are considered. (Same as HIST 563.) Prerequisite: EVRN 148 or HIST 129, or by permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Water quality issues are integrated with land use planning and the development of watershed management strategies. Interrelationships among the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric deposition, nutrient transformations and pesticide use are examined in regards to stream, lake, and groundwater quality. Prerequisite: CHEM 125 or CHEM 184 and BIOL 414, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The capstone project provides students with a broad-based, interdisciplinary educational experience and allows them to integrate and synthesize the knowledge they have gained in their environmental studies major. It rejoins the cohort that has separately pursued the BA/BGS and BS tracks and places them in situations in which they address real world environmental issues with a team approach and produce professionally meaningful analytical reports. Prerequisite: Junior standing; EVRN 320, EVRN 332, and EVRN 460. Restricted to declared Environmental Studies majors. LEC
View current sections...
Analysis of environmental politics and the formulation and implementation of environmental policy. Examines the history and development of environmental politics as well as current trends. Themes include interest groups, business interests, political institutions, and specific environmental policy issues. (Same as POLS 624.) LEC
View current sections...
A research course, in any of the fields of environmental studies, consisting of either experimental research, original policy analysis, or the preparation of an extensive paper based on library investigation. Project topic to be agreed upon in advance with supervising faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
A course giving eligible majors the opportunity to earn Departmental Honors by engaging in an intensive program of study leading to an original piece of research. Prerequisite: Senior standing, approval of the Environmental Studies Program, the Honors Project Director, and an overall 3.25 cumulative grade point average during the semester of enrollment. Restricted to declared Environmental Studies majors. IND
View current sections...
An introduction to the patterns and processes that affect terrestrial ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on understanding nutrient cycles (e.g., carbon nitrogen phosphorous), hydrologic cycles, and patterns of net primary productivity. The role of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances in structuring terrestrial ecosystems is examined in the context of global land-use patterns. Discussion of current research literature will be expected. (Same as BIOL 656.) Prerequisite: BIOL 414 and CHEM 184. LEC
View current sections...
Special course for candidates for advanced degrees in other departments. Fundamentals of grammar and reading of material of medium difficulty. Intended primarily for graduate students, but open also to seniors planning graduate study. Does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study of French. Conducted in English. LEC
View current sections...
Basic language instruction in French for beginners participating in study abroad programs in France or a French-speaking country. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. LEC
View current sections...
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. LEC
View current sections...
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 107 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Essentials of French grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing French. Introduction to French business culture. Three hours of class per week. This course does not satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: FREN 108 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Five hours of class per week. A balanced approach stressing understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. LEC
View current sections...
Five hours of class per week. A balanced approach stressing understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: FREN 110 or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Third-semester course stressing oral and written work in French; systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. (See also FREN 231, FREN 234.) Prerequisite: FREN 120 or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Similar in approach and content to FREN 230; smaller class size; open to students who had done very good to excellent work in previous French classes. Prerequisite: Grade of B or A in FREN 120 or departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
One-semester course meeting five times a week for six hours credit. Material same as in FREN 230 and FREN 240. (FREN 234, FREN 240, FREN 241--each completes foreign language requirement.) Prerequisite: FREN 120 or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Continuation of FREN 230. (FREN 234, FREN 240, FREN 241--each completes foreign language requirement.) (See also FREN 241.) Prerequisite: FREN 230, FREN 231, or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Similar in approach and content to FREN 240; smaller class size; open to students who have done very good to excellent work in previous French classes. Prerequisite: A grade of A in FREN 230 or FREN 231, or departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Designed to provide essential skills for advanced courses. Prerequisite: FREN 234, FREN 240, FREN 241, or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
A course in practical phonetics with exercises stressing rhythm, intonation, and individual sounds. Prerequisite: FREN 240, FREN 241, or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
Supplementary non-major language course that can be a sequel to the first four semesters of French. Primarily for students studying abroad. Covers vocabulary study, oral exercises, discussion of texts, writing, and free conversation. Prerequisite: FREN 230/231 or FREN 234, FREN 240/241. LEC
View current sections...
Analysis of selected texts from various genres; special emphasis on explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 300 (or with FREN 300), or by departmental permission. LEC
View current sections...
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad programs. LEC
View current sections...
A comprehensive, interdisciplinary survey of French culture that may include topics ranging from the earliest times to the present, with particular attention to literature, the arts, thought, politics, society, food, and customs. Does not count towards the major. LEC
View current sections...
A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad Programs. LEC
View current sections...
 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 >  Last ›

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.