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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Business courses

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This course covers the fundamental aspects of employee staffing and personnel selection in organizations, including the following: job analysis for selection procedure development; the nature of individual differences; measurement of individual differences; reliability; validity; legal and "fairness" issues; overview of the selection process; recruitment; initial screening and resume review; and the employment interview. It is recommended that this course be followed by MGMT 733 Advanced Methods for Selecting Employees. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course follows logically from MGMT 732 Recruiting and Selecting Effective Employees, and covers advanced personnel selection procedures including the following: job knowledge tests; cognitive ability tests; personality assessment; integrity testing; performance tests; assessment centers; drug testing. Prerequisite: MGMT 732. LEC
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This course focuses on fundamental principles and practices in designing and administering compensation and reward systems. The impact of compensation on employee recruitment, satisfaction, and performance is examined. Compensation management practices, including the analysis and evaluation of jobs, individual wage determination, employee benefits, and executive pay systems are emphasized. The influence of government and unions on pay practices is also discussed. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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The primary focus of this course is on "alternative" compensation and reward systems. After first discussing the factors motivating firms to adopt alternative approaches to pay, these alternative systems will be critically examined. Discussion will focus on: skills/knowledge-based plans; team-based plans; gainsharing/efficiency-based plans; profit-sharing and employee stock ownership plans; market-based (economic value added) plans; and, alternative recognition systems (e.g., spot bonus plans; non-cash awards). Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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The goal of this course is to increase the capacity of the student to manage others effectively. It begins by focusing on self awareness and self management. Students also learn systems for classification of people on the basis of behavior and attitudes. Topics covered may include time management, problem solving, reading people, coaching and counseling, delegation and empowerment, conflict resolution, motivation and discipline. The focus is on skill acquisition and the learning approaches including readings, inventories, role playing and case analysis. This course is not open to students with credit in MGMT 437. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course provides an overview of key issues in the process of developing effective training and development programs. Topics included are a systemic approach to human resource development, training needs assessment, methods of training program development and evaluation, and implications for careers. The intent is to provide a student with a practical understanding of operational and strategic issues in human resource development. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course investigates careers from individual and organizational perspectives with an emphasis on the implications of the current business environment. The organizational perspective includes career planning and pathing, the integration of career systems with other human resource programs, and the nature of the employee-employer relationship. The individual perspective includes career management strategies and skills to cope in the workplace, career theories, and balancing work and non-work. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course covers the measurement/appraisal of employee performance at the individual and small work group/team level, and the use of appraisal information in both administrative decision making and employee coaching, counseling, and individual/team performance improvement. Prerequisite: MGMT 702. LEC
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This course will focus on human resources strategy, practices, and institutions in different countries, particularly Europe and the Pacific Rim. Human resources management and industrial relations will be placed in their political, social, and economic context. Firm strategy and practices overseas in response to the global market and other environmental forces will be contrasted with that of U.S. firms. Prerequisite: BE 701. LEC
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This course examines the legal environment as it affects the management of employees. The focus is on an understanding of employment law that is needed by all managers rather than human resource specialists. Coverage includes Equal Employment Opportunity legislation, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. This course is taught online. LEC
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This course examines managing employees in the context of a labor union. The focus is on the creation of mutual gains and the avoidance of an adversary relationship. A major issue is how human resources can be used for a firm's competitive advantage in a union context. Topics covered include strategies for dealing with unions, the negotiation of agreements, productivity enhancement, contract administration, and dispute resolution. LEC
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A study of advanced topics in various subfields of Human Resources. The course focus, content, and approach will depend upon the particular topics to be covered. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: To be determined by instructor. LEC
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This course will include a study of the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in business contexts. It will focus on the use of alternatives to litigation, such as various forms of arbitration, mediation, and, especially, negotiation. In addition to emphasizing negotiation as a means of resolving disputes, attention will be directed at negotiation of transactions. Appreciation of concepts will be promoted through role play simulations. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 525 or MGMT 525. (Same as BLAW 748.) LEC
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Through experiential learning using live consulting assignments, students will achieve understanding clarity of the linkage between models and theories studied in the classroom and application in the field; direct interaction with clients at sophisticated corporate organizations; and first hand experience in addressing significant business challenges with impactful and strategically correct solutions. Students will enhance their team and leadership skill capabilities through interaction with other team members. This course is not open to students with credit in MGMT 485. LEC
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This course is designed to provide students with: (a) a grounding in the psychological and philosophical foundations of business ethics; (b) the ability to recognize ethical problems; (c) an exposure to many of the ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers today in each of the functional areas of business (management, accounting, finance, information systems, and marketing); and (d) the tools for analyzing and reaching closure on ethical problems. Students will study the role of ethics in the relation to the individual, manager, organization, and global business environment. Students in this course will have the opportunity to engage in stimulating class discussions, justify ethical positions in case study analyses, investigate ethical issues in their own future professional lives, and develop and present their solutions for typical ethical problems faced by managers in organizations after fully exploring the ethical dimensions of both sides of a given issue. This course is not open to students with credit in MGMT 405. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course provides a workshop format for a discussion of the currently prevalent research topics, methods, and problems being addressed in the areas of human resources management, organizational behavior, and strategic management. All first year PhD students in HRM, OB, and SM will typically enroll in this course their first and second semesters in the doctoral program. Students will enroll in this course with their respective faculty advisers, who will work out a schedule of research seminars that each student must attend and participate in during the semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Business PhD Program in HRM, OB, or SM, or permission of the Management Area Director. LEC
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An advanced introduction to the philosophy of science relevant to the behavioral and organizational sciences. Introduces the student to contemporary philosophical thought concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and its acquisition. Students will be exposed to classic works in the 20th century movement of thought in the philosophy of science and the philosophy of social science. Subject matter will include the study of logical positivism, anti-positivist responses such as falsificationism, epistemological anarchism, and Kuhnian relativism, to contemporary neo-pragmatist, postmodernist, and constructivist developments related to the indeterminacy of knowledge. The method of the course is philosophical; critical thinking, critical discussion, and dialectical exchange will be encouraged. The course is oriented to the interests of social scientists, rather than philosophers. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to develop in students an ability to analyze research reports critically and to provide skills in designing, performing, and reporting original behavioral research. Methodologies ranging from naturalistic field studies to laboratory experiments are reviewed along with various data collection strategies. Students prepare and defend an original research proposal. Recommended to be taken early in the program for Human Resource Management, Organizational Behavior, and Strategic Management doctoral students. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course provides an advanced survey of theories about organizations as entities, their properties, and major processes. Topics include structures, structural change, organizational forms, decentralization, effectiveness, adoption and diffusion processes, concepts and theories of processes, interdependence and recent developments in organizational design and change. Major organization theories are also covered. Students are expected to write a serious research paper. This course is primarily for School of Business Ph.D. students but other advanced graduate students may enroll with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing or masters students with at least one undergraduate or M.B.A. level behavioral science course or consent of instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on staffing organizations to produce effective performance of work. It covers work performance, recruitment, and virtually all aspects of personnel selection. Topics include but are not limited to the following: measurement issues (reliability, validity, decision-making strategies); validity generalization; legal issues (discrimination, adverse impact); job and work analysis; evaluation of job applicant training and work experience; weighted application blanks and biodata; ability testing; personality assessment; performance tests and assessment centers; other methods of assessment (integrity testing, drug testing, graphology). Typically reading assignments include a substantial textbook plus articles from research journals (e.g., Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology). Typically students are required to write a substantial paper on a major aspect of personnel selection approved by the Professor. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on the development and maintenance of human capital and career management. A multi-level perspective is adopted and issues are considered from individual and organizational perspectives within the context of an HR system addressing contemporary workplace challenges. Theoretical and empirical readings will be drawn from OB, HR, and other relevant social sciences. Topics and themes include the processes of (a) training design, from needs assessment, through development, delivery and evaluation, and (b) career development and management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on macro-level perspectives on managing people for organizational effectiveness. Theoretical and empirical readings will be drawn from the OB, HR, strategy and other relevant literatures (e.g., services marketing) that explore themes related to: (a) human/social capital and firm success; (b) employee attitudes/behavior and firm success; (c) HR policies/practices and firm success; and (d) contingency perspectives applied to the above, including factors such as national culture, industry, competitive strategy and employee groups. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on conceptual and empirical research in organizational behavior that seeks to understand how to achieve organizational effectiveness through establishing positive conditions for employees to flourish. The implications of these conditions for the motivation and ethical behavior of individuals will be discussed. Readings will address the following topics: Person-Organization Fit, Work Design, Work Teams, Leadership, Psychological Engagement, Decision-Making, Ethics, and Cross-cultural Dimensions of organization behavior or of the preceding topics. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on conceptual and empirical research in organizational behavior that seeks to understand how the interaction between individuals and organizational facets influences their sense-making and identity. The implications of these processes for employees' well-being, performance, and careers will be discussed. Readings will address the following topics: Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Employee Attachment and Job Attitudes, Individual Differences, Careers, Employee Well-being, Emotions, Attribution Theory, Sense-making processes, Identity, Organizational Culture, and Cross-cultural Dimensions/Globalization. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar focuses on theoretical and empirical research that seeks to understand the behavioral aspects of creativity and innovation in organizations. Central to this understanding is how organizations develop and change over time. Readings will include articles on the following topics: Expectancy theory, Goal setting, Intrinsic Motivation, Creativity, Innovation, Organizational Development, Learning, and Change Processes, Power and Politics, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors; and Cross-Cultural Dimensions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar surveys the scholarly literature in Strategic Management that is based on economic modeling of human and firm behavior. Topics include but are not limited to Industrial Organization Economics, Transaction Costs Economics, Property Rights Theory, Agency Theory, Resource-Based View and Dynamic Capabilities, and Real Options Theory. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar surveys the scholarly literature in Strategic Management that is based on behavioral, psychological and sociological theories. Topics include but are not limited to the Behavioral Theory of the Firm, Behavioral Models of Strategic Decision Making, Strategy Formation, Strategic Leadership including CEO's, Boards and Top Management Teams, Organizational Demography, Cognition in Strategic Decision Making, Power & Politics in Strategy Development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of management under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of marketing topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the student to marketing from the perspective of the business firm. Topics included are the marketing system, consumer and industrial behavior, market segmentation and positioning, product policy, channels of distribution, pricing strategy, sales management, and marketing communications. (Not open to students with credit in MKTG 310.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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A study of marketing from the point of view of the business firm. Topics include the structure of the marketing system, the nature of marketing management, consumer behavior, marketing research, product policy, channels of distribution policy, and analytical techniques useful to marketing management. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142, ACCT 200, and PSYC 104. Prior completion or coenrollment in DSCI 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of marketing topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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A study of the buyer's information acquisition, evaluation, purchasing, and post-purchasing evaluation process. Emphasis is placed upon social psychological theories and their implications on the understanding and prediction of consumers' behavior. The student, from the standpoint of the marketing manager, will apply behavioral science concepts to the problems of planning, pricing, and promotion decisions. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of marketing research and analytical approaches to marketing problems. The material is presented from an applied point of view and is designed to familiarize the student with those aspects of marketing research with which the marketing manager is likely to interact. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will deal with the use of advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and public relations as elements in a promotional program. The perspective of the course will be distinctly managerial. Therefore, the emphasis will be upon the efficient use of an organization's resources to accomplish communication goals through effective promotional strategy. A good part of the course will be spent examining the communication process; the nature of the receiver and how information is processed; determination of promotional objectives; promotional budget; media decisions, and measuring the effectiveness of the promotional campaigns. The goal of the course is to enable the students to better evaluate and devise a marketing communications program for any given product, service, or idea. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course, as an advanced marketing elective, is designed to integrate sales force planning into the marketing planning process; to present the necessary tools and skills needed for developing and evaluating a competitive sales function; and to analyze the components of the sales function from a managerial perspective. Specifically, topics include strategic sales planning, forecasting, quotas and compensation plans, selection and training, time and territory management, motivation, and performance analysis. Pedagogical methods for the course include: lecture, case study, role-playing, micro-computer simulations, and spreadsheet analyses. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course deals with the strategies, techniques, and methods used to develop and market a new product. An important aspect of the course deals with anticipating and managing change that can affect a firm's marketing opportunities and response. Also emphasized is the need for a disciplined process of development. Subjects examined include innovative thinking, identification, and development of marketing opportunities, marketing mix strategies, and implementation. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The emphasis of this course is strategic marketing analysis and planning. Concepts and methods for the strategic analysis of product-market definition, segmentation, product positioning, and new product planning are examples of individual subjects that are covered. However, the primary objective is to integrate various topics into a strategic planning framework. An important component of the course is the application of concepts to realistic marketing problems through the use of comprehensive marketing simulations or in-depth cases that capture the dynamics of the marketing environment. Students will learn how to identify markets, assess company strengths and weaknesses, target market segments, analyze competition, and develop specific functional strategies in such areas as product development, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 and Senior standing (90 hours completed). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Today businesses compete in a global environment. As such, marketing managers must recognize the global nature of their markets and must develop the knowledge background, sensitivity, and skills required to successfully operate in this dynamic setting. This course examines the array of activities required to select, gain entry, and compete in a location other than the "home" country. Also examined is the influence that culture, environment, government regulation, and economic systems can have upon marketing mix decisions (product, price, promotion, distribution) related to localization, standardization, and local adaptation. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course prepares students for careers, which will entail managing businesses in the service sector. This sector includes accounting management consulting, engineering services, environmental services, health care, research, architectural, hotel and restaurant, charitable, and many others. It provides the foundation a student needs so that he or she can move beyond providing technical support to the client and towards managing and developing the business. For a marketing or management student, it provides the foundation they need to be able to find a job, hit the ground running, and advance in a marketing (management) position with companies in the service sector. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines how the power of today's digital technologies can be harnessed to enhance and deploy the marketing function. The course begins with an overview of the key forces shaping the digital environment. It then examines several topics that define and characterize marketing in this new environment. Illustrative topics include web business models, traffic driving strategies, one-to-one marketing, personalization, closed-loop marketing, online support, dynamic pricing, channel redesign, and m-commerce. Throughout, emphasis is placed on linking key concepts to best practices in the field. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The primary objective of this course is to examine the concepts and tools required to effectively manage the pricing function. Both strategic and tactical aspects of pricing will be covered with a view to identify profit-boosting practices across a range of professional contexts - as product managers, business unit managers, management consultants, and entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course is an experiential approach to promotional campaign development with an emphasis on promotional strategy as a single component of the total marketing strategy. Student teams work with actual businesses to address the business's individual marketing needs. Students conduct environmental and industry analysis and primary and secondary market research to identify target markets, develop a marketing strategy, promotional objectives, product positioning, brand development and ROI measures for a promotional strategy. Students then complete media planning, creative execution, and budgeting and present the project to the business. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 and at least two of the following three courses: MKTG 411, MKTG 415, or MKTG 435. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the strategy and tactics of customer relationship management (CRM). Particular emphasis is given toward identifying the key strategic principles inherent in the customer-centric focus that underlies a successful CRM program. Topics include: fundamentals of CRM strategy, marketing metrics, customer profitability analysis, choice modeling, techniques for evaluating model performance and applications of CRM to marketing campaign management. Students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools and real-world data. (Same as SCM 425.) Prerequisite: MKTG 310; SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in marketing not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the readings and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines the marketing function of the firm, primarily from a managerial perspective. The topics examined include: marketing concepts, segmentation, and decisions related to positioning, products, pricing, distribution, and promotion. LEC
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The course is designed to develop an understanding for the need for a disciplined process of development, and to follow the basic steps of opportunity identification, testing, and implementation. It deals with the strategies, techniques, and methods used to develop and market a new product or service. The emphasis is on "learning by doing." The course will focus on the enhancement of innovative thinking, the identification and development of marketing opportunities, entry strategies; and developing the marketing mix for the new product. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 430. Prerequisite: ACCT 702 or MKTG 701 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A course designed (1) to review behavioral science concepts applicable to understanding the buyer's behavior, (2) to investigate the specific processes of consumer decision-making and purchasing, and (3) to discuss the research applications of behavioral science concepts to marketing problems. Topics include: environmental influences on the consumer's evaluation, perception, information processing, attitude, purchasing processes, post-purchase evaluation and related theories. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 411. Prerequisite: ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course can act either as a survey course for the graduate student interested in an introduction to marketing research or as a first course for the student planning to take additional work in marketing research and analysis. Topics include: questionnaire design, data sources, measurement and scaling, sampling, experimentation, and statistical analysis of data. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 415. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course investigates the marketing communications system primarily from a managerial perspective. The course operates from the premise that the development of any persuasive communications strategy - be it advertising mass communications or personal sales - is best accomplished after an understanding of the basic elements of communication and management. Consequently, a good part of the course will be spent examining the communications process, the nature of the receiver and how information is processed, communications research, and the determination of communications budgets and objectives. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 420. Prerequisite: ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is a capstone marketing course designed around a strategic marketing planning approach with a clear emphasis upon how to do strategic analysis and planning. Methods for the strategic analysis of business units, product-market definition, segmentation, positioning, and new product planning are examples of topics that will be covered. However, the primary course objective is to integrate the various methods and topics into a strategic planning framework which should enable participants to formulate alternative market planning strategies; to translate organizational mission strategies into the marketing plan; and to conceptualize the formulation, integration, implementation, and control of long-range and short-range planning. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 435. Prerequisite: ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An analysis of selected statistical and mathematical techniques that are currently being applied or are potentially applicable to the solution of marketing problems. Extensive use is made of actual studies that have utilized these techniques. Prerequisite: MKTG 415 or ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to provide a set of conceptual and managerial tools to students for undertaking marketing of products and services on a global scale. The topics covered in the course include economic and financial dimensions in global marketing, social and cultural aspects of the global market environment, regional market characteristics, international trade theories, political and legal issues in global marketing. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the study of competitive analysis and competitive strategy for the global markets, marketing information systems, various strategies for entering global markets, organization, planning and control of global marketing, and marketing mix decisions (product, price, promotion, and distribution) in a global setting. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 440. Prerequisite: ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In many industries, the sales force is the primary vehicle for taking the product to market. The main objective of this course is to expose students to the concepts, tools, and techniques required to effectively manage this important function. Since the use of personal selling is generally more pronounced within industrial markets, this course will first analyze issues unique to industrial marketing. Topics here include industrial buying behavior, segmentation strategies for industrial markets, life cycle strategies, and managing the pricing function for industrial products. Using this foundation, the next part of the course will cover issues specific to the management of the sales force such as structuring the sales force, sizing the sales force, demand estimation, quota setting, and sales force compensation. Finally, the last part of the course will focus on skills required for professional selling such as handling objections and closing the sales call. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 425. LEC
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The internet and digital technologies continue to profoundly impact all aspects of the marketing function. The broad objectives of this course are to better understand how digital technologies create value for customers and profits for companies. Special emphasis will be placed on new opportunities afforded by digital technologies. Specific topics include personalization, closed-loop marketing, online communities, new pricing formats, harnessing dispersed competence, and formulating win-win marketing strategies. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 450. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In this course, students are first exposed to the various viewpoints that govern pricing. After introducing pricing as an integral part of the marketing decision process, the course will develop an appreciation of the various tools (for example, consumer behavior and game theory) used to arrive at competitive pricing strategies. Cases will be used to illustrate both the tools and resulting strategies. Illustrative topics include: Value-based pricing, price matching guarantees, predatory pricing, behavioral pricing, interaction of pricing with channel decisions, bundling, and online auctions. While using various methods, care will be taken to differentiate long-term strategies and short-term tactics used by firms. Overall, students will be able to create effective pricing strategies and also understand how pricing policy fits into the overall marketing function of the organization. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 455. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Unique characteristics associated with services (e.g., intangibility, perishability, and real-time production) necessitate use of a different set of concepts, methods, and frameworks for their effective management. This broad course is designed to fill the knowledge-gap between managing products and managing services. Sample topics covered in this course include managing customer expectations, customer satisfaction measurement, managing service demand, mobilizing people for breakthrough service, managing service recovery, relationship marketing, customer lifetime value analysis, and managing services in a global context. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 445. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and practical implementation of customer relationship management (CRM) strategies using marketing databases. Topics include: fundamentals of CRM strategy, RFM analysis, LTV metrics, logit models, decision tress, techniques for evaluating model performance (e.g., lift charts, ROC) and applications to campaign management. In keeping with the hands-on nature of the course, students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 465/SCM 425. Prerequisite: MKTG 704. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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(V) Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course deals with measurement tools typically used in marketing such as conjoint analysis, multi-dimensional scaling, questionnaire construction, formative and causal indicators of constructs, scale development and testing, reliability and validity issues, and design of complex lab and field experiments. The goal of the course is to equip students with measurement tools to conduct research in academic and applied settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar provides an overview of the current theories and methodological approaches associated with consumer behavior research. Main topics of the course include attention and information search, consumer memory structure, consumer knowledge, inference making, motivation/goal, consumer attitude and persuasion, judgment and decision making, self-perception and regulation, culture's influence on consumer behavior, and affect/emotion/mood. The content will be based on literature from multiple disciplines including marketing, psychology, sociology, and economics. Students will be required to critically analyze and synthesize the literature, with a view to formulate research proposals on issues that interest them. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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The primary objective of this course is to gain an appreciation for modeling marketing phenomena from a decision support perspective. Emphasis will be placed on reviewing a broad range of topics, with a view to understanding the model building process across a wide variety of contexts. In addition, although marketing models include both verbal models and mathematical models, the emphasis will primarily be on the latter. Illustrative research questions analyzed include: How should a firm design incentives for salespeople? Should a firm sell its products individually or in bundles? How can promotions be designed to increase retail pass through? Does it pay to be first to market? Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on fundamentals of marketing communications with a heavy emphasis on message-memory. Some of the topics covered in this course include memory structures and measures, resistance to persuasion, alignability and comparative advertising, mere exposure effects, effect of syntactic complexity on message effectiveness, working memory deficits and multimedia presentations, memory interference and brand dilution, resistance to persuasion, mood and memory, adjunct questions and memory for print messages, communicating with audiences with working memory deficits (e.g., elderly adults), and communicating with bilingual consumers. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar exposes students to the various analytical approaches to understand and model pricing phenomena by examining the classic as well as contemporary works on pricing. The students will learn how to model strategic interactions in the marketplace using game theory and other analytical tools as well as theories such as auction theory, prospect theory, and mental accounting. Some of the topics covered in this course include price discrimination mechanisms, price as a competitive tool (e.g., entry deterrence), price as a promotional strategy, role of price in channel structure and strategy, and effect of price on consumer choice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on understanding products and the product development process. Readings are drawn from the literature in marketing, management, decision theory and psychology. Some topics covered in the course include creation and diffusion of innovations, modeling consumers' perceptions and preferences, brand equity and branding, entry order, sales forecasting, and global product development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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Introduces some of the most widely used models from management science in business decision making. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, resource allocation models, and production and operations management. (Formerly DSCI 310). Prerequisite: Prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 301 and IST 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of supply chain management topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the student to supply chain management. Students are presented the key concepts of supply chain management, the application of these concepts and are provided with the managerial knowledge of supply chain management through class discussions and case studies. Students discover the impact of information technologies, strategic alliances and logistics on supply chain management and the performance implication of supply chain management. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiations and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging, and materials handling. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions, processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding ERP systems as solutions to integration. (Same as IST 401.) Prerequisite: SCM 401 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Integrating and apply the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, projects, and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 401 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is concerned with the analysis and interpretation of data encountered in business and economics. One goal of the course is to develop skills in the analysis of data that can be used to solve problems students are likely to encounter on the job. The course attempts to develop an attitude toward data analysis that can be usefully applied in a wide variety of real life situations. A variety of statistical tools are covered. In particular, the multiple regress model is covered with an emphasis on how the model can be used in situations involving economic data. Data analysis techniques are illustrated with examples and case studies using computers. This course is in the management sciences and operations management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Design, develop, and use computer decision models for analysis of supply chain operations; computer intensive course work emphasizing spreadsheet applications. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as FIN 460.) Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to build the conceptual framework which drives an organization striving to operate in a customer-focused mode. This requires an integration of basic principles of marketing and operations in order to define the value-added in each of an organization's products and/or services, to use this information to define the value-added in work, and to use this definition to improve the actual work. To do this effectively, requires leadership, empowerment, focused data, and a system view. The basic principles of each requirement will be discussed as well as their integration into a unified whole. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310) and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and practical implementation of customer relationship management (CRM) strategies using marketing databases. Topics include: fundamentals of CRM strategy, RFM analysis, LTV metrics, logit models, decision tress, hazard models techniques for evaluating model performance (e.g., lift charts, ROC) and applications to campaign management. In keeping with the hands-on nature of the course, students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools. (Same as MKTG 465.) Prerequisite: DSCI 301 and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the principles and practices for designing and managing integrated supply chain operations, focusing on the flow of products, services, information, and funds between firms. The interrelationships among customer service, supply management, inventory management and logistics are investigated. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: DSCI 701. LEC
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This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiation and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging and materials handling. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding (ERP) systems as solution to integration. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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Integrating and applying the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, project and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of supply chain management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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