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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Business courses

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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This is an interdisciplinary course which will focus on the social, culture, and political environment for business in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The emphasis will be on the factors influencing and shaping the current and rapidly-changing political and economic contests of African countries. The course is open to both business and nonbusiness students, and is designed to explore the connections between language and area-studies topics and the practice of business in Africa. The course will be organized around modules covering geography, language, culture and society, history, politics, and economics. Most of these modules will be covered by visiting faculty with specialization in those areas. There will also be guest lectures by government officials involved in managing and promoting business ties between the USA and Africa, as well as from practicing business people in the area who have had experience in African markets. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in East Asia. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language and area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the School of Business and the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. Prerequisite: Sophomore status (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Latin America. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the Business School, the Center of Latin American Studies, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in the "transition economies" of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the Business School and college departments associated with the Center for Russian and East European Studies (e.g., Political Science, History, Sociology, Geography, etc.) Prerequisite: Sophomore status (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as EURS 401.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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To conduct International Business, a manager must understand the prevailing political, economic, legal and socio-cultural institutions in the relevant countries. In addition, s/he must also understand the institutional arrangements that countries have negotiated to govern cross-border flows of trade and investment capital, such as the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund. This course provides an analysis of the institutional settings for international business and explores their implications for a multinational firm. Specific topics covered include, but are not limited to, the forces behind international economic integration and globalization of business, differences across countries, and the frameworks of international trade, investment and finance. Prerequisite: ECON 144. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will focus on the business and managerial practices that have evolved in response to major characteristics of Latin American business environment. A survey of Latin American economic conditions (including inflation, stabilization, regional integration, and privatization) will set the stage for the examination of management practices that have developed in response to these conditions. Prerequisite: Completion of an intermediate macroeconomics course is strongly recommended or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines Japanese business in the context of both Japanese society and the global economic environment. An overview of the Japanese economy, with special emphasis on employment patterns and trends, will be combined with an examination of business-government relations and the role of Japanese culture on organizational behavior. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or consent of instructor and junior status. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms conducting business in the country. The first part of the course reviews the country's geography, history and culture, and examines its contemporary political process, economic structure, financial system, and legal and social institutions. The second part of the course examines important strategic and operational decisions such as market entry, contract negotiation, value chain management, choice of marketing strategies and techniques, and human resource management. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: IBUS 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Following a brief study of nature of the (formerly) centrally planned economies, emphasis will be placed on the current transition to the market-based systems. Special focus will be placed on privatization, the evolution of labor and financial markets, and the legal and regulatory frameworks for conducting business. A comparative approach will be taken in the analysis of individual markets and performance. Prerequisite: Junior status unless a specific course is needed or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course explores how culture, in all of its aspects, is a major determinant of organizational practices and performance. We analyze how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Finally, we will investigate the possibilities for transferring certain practices between cultures. A primary goal is to provide an understanding of the complex linkage among the cultural, social, economic, and political variables that influence organizations and drive the differences and similarities in organizational behavior and business strategy, as well as the values and expectations of organizational members. This is accomplished through readings, lecture, in-class exercises, and case analyses. We emphasize the development of the skills necessary for managing multicultural diversity in both domestic and international settings. Major illustrations are drawn from all world areas, and each student develops in-depth knowledge of one country through a semester-long project. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In the global economy, managers need to expand their repertoires of knowledge and skills in order to be effective. This course examines the important managerial issues arising from a firm's expansion into the international arena and introduces an array of analytical frameworks and management techniques that can be useful to an international manager. Specific topics covered include foreign market entry decisions, strategies and organizational structures for managing a multinational corporation, and management of various functional areas (such as production, marketing, finance and human resources) in an international setting. Prerequisite: FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in international business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on economic, social, and political trends in the global environment and examines their implications for national and regional competitiveness. Extensive use will be made of guest speakers from other departments and local companies. Flexibility in format is required to accommodate instructional methods that will include lectures, discussions, cases, and simulations. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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This introductory course aims at providing a framework for understanding the basic concepts, practices, and issues involved in international business and economic relations. Focus is placed on (1) the evolution of the present international monetary and trade systems, with emphasis on the role of the IMF and GATT (now the World Trade Organization); (2) the nature and current transition of former centrally planned economies; (3) the nature and prospects of less developed countries; and (4) the interdependence of the major industrialized nations (with coverage also of regional integration initiatives). This course is not open to students with credit in IBUS 410. LEC
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Managing across nation means managing across cultures, languages, institutions, time zones, governmental regulations, etc. In addition, multinationals (and the more recent phenomenon of off-shoring) are not always viewed in a positive light. International Business Strategy will explore both the benefits and challenges involved in managing activities across borders. Topics covered include: the analysis of fit between a company, its products and specific international markets; assessing and responding to competing pressures to hold down costs while adapting to local demands; and optimizing organizational structure to facilitate knowledge location and movement. Case studies are used to develop analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the international context. LEC
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This course explores how culture, in all of its aspects, is a major determinant of organizational practices and performance. We analyze how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Finally, we will investigate the possibilities for transferring certain practices between cultures. A primary goal is to provide an understanding of the complex linkage among the cultural, social, economic, and political variables that influence organizations and drive the differences and similarities in organizational behavior and business strategy, as well as the values and expectations of organizational members. We accomplish this through analysis of a series of related cases, providing a nuanced look at the effects of culture on multiple business functions within a single company. This foundation is supplemented by readings, lecture, and in-class exercises. We emphasize the development of the skills necessary for managing multicultural diversity in both domestic and international settings. Major illustrations are drawn from all world areas, and each student develops in-depth knowledge of one country through a semester-long project. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in a particular foreign country. Students will travel to the country of interest to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in that country. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at an in-country host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. ). Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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The course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms conduction business in the country. The first part of the course reviews the country's geography, history and culture, and examines its contemporary political process, economic structure, financial system, and legal and social institutions. The second part of the course examines important strategic and operational issues such as market entry, contract negotiation, supply chain management, marketing strategies and techniques, and human resource management. Recommended: IBUS 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course analyzes the business environment of Latin America and the managerial practices that have evolved in this unique context. Using cases, readings, lectures and videos, the course seeks to cover a broad set of countries, industries and companies as it examines the conduct and performance of business in Latin America. Recommended: IBUS 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The class will use a mix of lectures, guest speakers, cases and assignments to understand the context and contemporary practice of business in India. Topical industries/issues will be covered in the course. The course deals with the challenges related to consumer diversity, human resources, political environment and infrastructure. Unique Indian business practices and models used in rural marketing and supply-chain management will be examined. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in China by observing it in practice. Students will travel to China to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in China. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Chinese host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Specific prerequisites may be required for a particular offering of this class. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in Latin America by observing it in practice. Students will travel to a Latin American country to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in Latin America. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Latin American host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Specific prerequisites may be required for a particular offering of this class. LEC
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The class will expose you to economic, political and cultural aspect of this growing market and the impact rapid growth and economic transformation are having on Indian businesses. We will visit businesses, cultural centers and educational institutions in India. Industry leaders and experts will make presentations in India. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This seminar surveys the literature, classic and contemporary, that forms the theoretical basis of the international business field. Topics covered include but are not limited to: (1) institutional issues such as the international framework of trade and investment, crosscountry governance differences, and the role of NGOs; (2) firm-level strategic issues such as choice of market entry modes, international entrepreneurship, and management of multinational enterprises; and (3) group- and individual-level organizational issues such as international staffing and cross-cultural management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on the use of information systems in business. Topics will include components of information systems, types of information systems, development of information systems, and uses and benefits of information systems. Relevant technology issues such as security, privacy and ethics will also be introduced. In addition to content on information systems, the course will cover the basic principles of Microsoft Office. (Not open to students with credit in IST 301.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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This course introduces essential components of information systems from an organizational perspective. The course covers the role of information systems in organizations, the technical foundations of information systems, the design and management of information systems, and the effect of information systems on organizations. The course also exposes students to software tools used to solve business problems. Prerequisite: ACCT 200 or coenrollment in ACCT 200. LEC
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This course provides an overview of how to understand, analyze, and design computerized information systems, and is designed to provide the computer tools and knowledge so that today's business student will be tomorrow's successful and complete manager and/or consultant. The topics covered in this course include computer technology, internal control in a computer environment, strategic information systems planning, systems analysis and design, database systems, networking, and various software packages. This course will count as an advanced business elective. Not open to students with credit in ACCT 311. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to software development concepts and techniques. Students will develop an understanding of the software development process through hands-on programming assignments and projects. The course emphasizes problem solving, initiative, and teamwork within an information systems framework. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This will take students through the entire systems development life cycle from the first contact with a customer through analysis and design to the implementation of the customer's system. It will introduce the student to the field of systems analysis and design, basic systems analysis tools, and the procedures for conducting systems analysis. Topics covered will include the role of the systems analyst in the organization, concepts, philosophies and trends in systems analysis and design, and tools and techniques for such analysis. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the fundamental concepts and implementation of the database development process and relational database systems. The student will be exposed to database development issues, SQL methodology, and entity-relationship models. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces business students to the terms and concepts of networking in the business environment. This course balances practical application and network theory. It examines common architecture models, transmission media, network topologies, and protocols in both local area network (LAN) and wide area network (WAN) environments. The course also delves into the operating characteristics of the Internet and various applicable protocol suites. Conceptual learning is supported by team exercises and projects. Prerequisite: IST 301. Prerequisite or Corequisite: IST 320. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to a wide range of topics associated with managing the security of information systems and related data in a business environment. Topics addressed include cryptography and security of operating systems, databases, networks. . . both wired and wireless, and telecommunications systems. Security issues are examined related to application development and to the use of the Internet as a business medium. Other elements of security are reviewed: physical security, disaster recovery and business resumption planning, change control, and so forth. On successful completion of the course, each student will be better able to: a. Understand and appreciate risks associated with business information systems infrastructures and the dynamic nature of these threats. b. Evaluate various risks associated with information systems. c. Envision controls that might mitigate these risks. d. Possess the ability to effectively articulate the threats and need for appropriate controls to others, be they higher management, peers, or subordinates. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of information systems technology topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. We explore process integration of business-wide functions (controlling, production planning, demand management, sales and distribution) as required and supported by ERP implementations. The objectives of the course include: (1) understanding processes and data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the challenges of independent information systems and; (3) understanding ERP systems as solutions to business process integration. (Same as SCM 404.) Prerequisite: SCM 401 or IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines a wide range of innovative information technologies (IT) which have both technical and strategic implications for businesses. These IT innovations affect all functions of businesses. Topics include Web 2.0, Web 3.0, next generation Web, social networking technology, virtual world, pervasive computing, ubiquitous computing, unified communications (unification), IT utility, on-demand computing, gird computing, Web services, service-orientation architecture, business intelligence, data mining, search technology and applications (Google), next generation Web search, virtualization (server, hardware), storage fabrics, open source, IT outsourcing, personal technology, health care IT, green IT, security and privacy, Internet policy, regulation global control, and the gap between IT and business (goals and strategies). This course is available to all undergraduate and graduate students in the business school. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides initial exposure to concepts related to the project management discipline generally, while focusing on management of information technology projects in particular. The course is organized to emphasize core project management knowledge areas developed by the Project Management Institute, and it stresses the benefits of a disciplined, formal project management methodology. Students completing the course will gain an appreciation for the complex nature of projects and be better prepared to be an effective member of project teams encountered in many types of organizations. Prerequisite: IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in information systems technology not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; approval of the Area Director. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides a broad, managerial level introduction to fundamental information technology concepts and terminology and the application of those concepts in business organizations. It addresses a variety of topics including: the Internet, intranets, and extranets; relational database theory; hardware, software, and networking concepts; the system development life cycle, project management; eBusiness/eCommerce; knowledge management; enterprise resource planning; ethical considerations related to information technology advances; and organizational considerations related to information systems. The course focuses on the knowledge and expertise required for managers to successfully leverage information systems assets in a business setting. LEC
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This course focuses on the practical issues of system development. A main objective of the course is to teach students system development through programming projects. In addition, the course examines the software engineering issues involved in system development, including usability and design issues, and alternative systems development processes. To enhance the quality of the system developed, the course also looks into software testing and evaluation issues. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 320. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701 or concurrent enrollment in IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides insight to the managerial and organizational issues that surround the development and implementation of database systems in organizations. Students will undertake a project that allows them to experience the database development process while learning and practicing modern data modeling techniques. Students will also study the value that databases have to the organization and the impact that databases have on decision-making processes. Students also will study strategic issues that impact database development and will research the latest advances in database management systems and other emerging technology to gain insight on how these advances will impact the future of database development. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 326. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course develops skills with regard to the Analysis and Design activities typically encountered in an organizational software development environment. It emphasizes structured project planning, analysis and design techniques, including Project Estimation Methods, Data Flow Diagrams, Entity-Relationship Diagrams, and the application of CASE (Computer-Aided Software Engineering) Tools. The teaching methods will combine classroom experience with an analysis and design case study using role-play techniques to simulate an actual analysis and design scenario. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 325. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course has two objectives. The first objective is to give graduate students an understanding of the need for high level IT strategy in organizations. This is accomplished through case analysis, the experiential learning of strategic concepts and through interaction with IT executives. IT strategy is explored at the executive levels of an organization. The second objective of the course is to give students experience working on projects/research and presenting materials as is done in developing IT strategy for real organizations. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course exposes graduate business students to the technical and managerial aspects of business networking. The course will provide students with a foundation in networking concepts and relevant technologies. At the same time, discussions on utilizing networking on business applications and strategies will be a major component of the course. The course will use cases and outside readings to focus on key network management issues and to present emerging network technologies. Conceptual learning is supported by selected hands-on exercises in the lab. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 330. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will introduce, at a managerial rather than highly technical level, a range of topics associated with security of information systems and related data in a business environment. Topics addressed include selected cryptography concepts and the security of operating systems, databases, networks--both wired and wireless, and telecommunications systems. The course also considers security issues related to application development, including management of the change control process, and to the use of the Internet as a business medium. Students will also address physical security, disaster recovery, business resumption planning, and managerial planning and techniques involved in creating a security conscious organization. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 335. Prerequisite: IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines how organizations and individuals exploit the Internet and other emerging information technology to conduct business in an information era. This course combines practice and theory to examine successes, failures, and common practices when using information technology for e-commerce activities. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is an introduction to object-oriented (OO) technology and the object paradigm. We explore the object paradigm, its benefits and limitations. Specifically, we study a state-of-art technique for OO modeling. We also apply this technique to the analysis and design of a system, and implement the concepts with OO programming. Students will gain practical experience in OO analysis, design, and implementation through projects with an OO programming language. Prerequisite: IST 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines a wide range of innovative information technologies (IT) which have both technical and strategic implications for businesses. These IT innovations affect all functions of businesses. Topics include Web 2.0, Web 3.0, next generation Web, social networking technology, virtual world, pervasive computing, ubiquitous computing, unified communications (unification), IT utility, on-demand computing, grid computing, Web services, service-oriented architecture, business intelligence, data mining, search technology and applications (Google), next generation Web search, virtualization (server, hardware), storage fabrics, open source, IT outscoring, personal technology, health care IT, green IT, security and privacy, Internet policy, regulation, global control, and the gap between IT and business (goals and strategies). This course is not open to students with credit in IST 405. Prerequisite: IST 301 or IST 701. LEC
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This course provides initial exposure to concepts related to the project management discipline generally, while focusing on management of information technology projects in particular. The course is organized to emphasize core project management knowledge areas developed by the Project Management Institute, and it stresses the benefits of a disciplined, formal project management methodology. Students completing the course will gain an appreciation for the complex nature of projects and be better prepared to be an effective member of project teams encountered in many types of organizations. This course is not open to students with credit in IST 410. Prerequisite: IST 701 or IST 301. LEC
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Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit. Enrollment restricted and by permission only. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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(V) Individual study of selected current problems in the field of information systems to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to acquaint students with traditional business management ideas, recent management thinking, and the contemporary application of both to the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A survey of a wide variety of topics is offered, generally including goal setting, strategy formulation and implementation, managerial decision making, structure and design of organizations, corporate culture, organizational change and development, human resources management, managing diversity, leading, motivation, communication, teamwork, quality control, management control systems, operations and service management, entrepreneurship and small business management, managerial ethics, corporate social responsibility, and management in the global environment. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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This course serves as an introduction to the study of individual and group behavior within the context of an organization. An objective may be the development of the student's potential for becoming an effective organization member and manager of people. Experiential learning methods are utilized to involve the student actively. A wide variety of topics and theories may be covered, generally including motivation, leadership, job design, group dynamics, and formal organizational structure and process. Prerequisite: Completion of ECON 142, ACCT 200, PSYC 104, and one course in the social science, society and culture (s/c) principal course area. Prior completion or coenrollment in ACCT 201 and DSCI 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to provide students with: (a) a grounding in the psychological and philosophical foundations of business ethics; (b) the ability to recognize ethical problems; (c) an exposure to many of the ethically sensitive issues facing corporations and managers in business today (e.g., layoffs, outsourcing, employee whistle-blowing, employee privacy, employee health and safety, marketing and advertising, environmental issues, discrimination, and the global responsibilities of business); and (d) the tools for analyzing and reaching closure on ethical problems. Students will study the role of ethics in the relation of business to employees, consumers, and society. Students in this course will have the opportunity to engage in stimulating class discussions, justify ethical positions in case study analyses, investigate ethical issues in their own future professional lives, and develop and present their solutions for typical ethical problems faced by managers in organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The major focus is on the management concerns of staffing, training and development, compensation, and labor-management relations. Constraints on management discretion, including legislation, court decisions, labor unions, and labor markets are reviewed. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Sports Management majors may petition for entry to the course with completion of the following prerequisite: MGMT 305, ECON 142, and an introductory statistics course (DSCI 301, HSES 310, MATH 365, PSYC 300). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course covers various aspects of employee staffing and personnel selection in organizations-the nature of individual differences, the measurement of individual differences, reliability, validity, legal and "fairness" issues, job analysis for job description and selection procedure development, recruitment, initial screening and resume review, the employment interview, general and specific ability tests, personality tests, assessment centers, performance tests, integrity testing, and drug testing. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course develops (1) competency in training and development skills and (2) understanding of career management issues in organizations. Individual and organizational perspectives are adopted. Topics include assessing training needs, developing and delivering training, evaluating outcomes, career planning, strategies for managing careers, and work/life balance. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on principles and practices in designing and administering performance management and reward systems. The measurement of employee performance at both the individual and group levels is reviewed. The use of performance measurement information for administrative decision-making and employee development is discussed. The impact of reward systems on employee recruitment, satisfaction and individual and firm-level performance is examined, including approaches to established pay structures, individual and group-based pay-for-performance plans, executive pay issues, government influences, and employee benefits. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Coverage in the course focuses on the development, legal environment, and current problems in the industrial labor relations system. Emphasis is placed upon the historical evolution of the labor movement, the law of labor relations, and the economic constraints which affect labor relations. Prerequisite: BE 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is an investigation of human resource development and utilization, focusing upon current employment and training problems and public and private solutions to these problems. Prerequisite: BE 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The focus of this course is how the legal environment affects the management of employees. The topics covered include laws on employment discrimination, employment-at-will, and negligent hiring, the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and the Family and Medical Leave Act. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The primary objective of this course is to increase student's understanding of core HRM activities as they are conducted in global context. These activities include staffing, performance management, training and development, compensation, and labor relations. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The goal of this course is to increase the capacity of the student to manage others effectively. It begins by focusing on self-awareness and self-management. Students also learn systems for classification of people on the basis of behavior and attitudes. Topics covered include time management, problem solving, reading people, coaching and counseling, delegation and empowerment, conflict resolution, motivation, and discipline. The focus is on skill acquisition, and the learning approaches including readings, inventories, role-playing, and case analyses. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on the principles and methods that general managers use to implement strategies, both at the business unit and corporate levels. While stressing the complex nature of the general manager's job, the organization's mission, environment, technology, and strategy are discussed as the primary drivers of designing effective organization structures, processes, and management systems. Change processes for realigning the organization's strategy, structure, processes, and culture are further emphasized, highlighting the role of the general manager as the architect of change. Topics covered include: organization design, transaction costs, behavior and ouput control; strategic leadership; design of information and reward systems; organizational change and cultural change processes. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides the opportunity to learn and practice the behaviors common to business leaders; these include establishing direction, aligning others behind that direction, motivating and inspiring, and generally promoting organizational change and transformation. Experiential learning will be used to develop skills by having students lead learning teams through a variety of classroom-based exercises and one service learning project of their choosing. Creation of a personal leadership development plan will be a major component of a portfolio of assessments, analyses, and reflections that the student will build throughout the course. A key goal will be establishing a leadership development mindset that will drive students' future personal and professional development efforts. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to examine business from a project management perspective, to develop a systems view of business rather than a functional view and to lay the foundation for future leaders to more effectively integrate project management into their business strategy. Further, to establish a common language for and a common knowledge of project management concepts, principles and practices. This course is intended to help students gain an understanding of what project management involves, how it relates to other functional management areas, and its role in an organization's structure and leadership. This course is made up of topical lectures, article/video analysis, open discussion, in-class experiential exercises and a team-based outside class project. In order to foster good project management habits, topics will be covered in the order they appear in the project lifecycle starting with project selection and bidding and ending with project acceptance and close out. Topics covered in this course include: the importance and role of project management, the contextual nature of projects, logistics issues in project management, and the E-business impact on project management. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310) and MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Business Consulting teaches the skills necessary to become consummate consultants and presents students with live projects incorporating real business challenges requiring real time analysis, consideration of practical alternative strategies, exploration of sales and profit implications of the selected strategy and delivery of a full rationalized recommendation to real clients. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course exposes the student to the role of general management in complex organizations. The cases, conceptual materials, and projects are selected to provide the student with decision-making opportunity in major areas of managerial concern: environmental opportunities and constraints, formulation of business policy, and policy implementation mechanisms. Knowledge and skills gained in previous business courses, including marketing, finance, and quantitative methods, will be applied to problems associated with the totality of organizational activity. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310); FIN 310; MGMT 310; and MKTG 310 and Senior standing (90 hours completed). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in management not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course involves the study of the theory and practice of dispute resolution and negotiation in business mediation (facilitated negotiation). Conflict resolution in the workplace, including grievance procedures, will be considered. Students are required to apply concepts studied through role playing simulations. (Same as BLAW 525.) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 and BE 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on human behavior in organizations. It helps the student learn to think systemically and critically about organizations, to appreciate knowledge building in the organization sciences, and to apply that knowledge in the work setting. Topics covered may include: individual differences and motivation, work and group design, leading and decision making, organization design and culture, and organization change and development. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to equip managers to create a sustainable competitive advantage through strategic investment in human resources. The management of human resources - people and their human capital - is approached from the perspective of the practicing manager as opposed to that of the human resources specialist. The major topics covered include staffing, training and development, performance management, compensation, and employee (labor-management) relations. These topics are examined within the context in which an organization operates. Recommended: BE 701, DSCI 701 and MGMT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Strategic Management has as its primary objective the development of an understanding of the role of general management from both a conceptual and operating standpoint. The course is based on the strategic management framework emphasizing the evaluation of an organization's strategic situation and the formulation of viable alternative strategies required to deal with the challenges facing the organization. Attention will be given to the development of organizational objectives and the formulation of strategies at the corporate, business, and operating levels. In addition, the course will address the various issues related to the effective implementation of such strategies. Prerequisite: MGMT 701, FIN 701, and ACCT 702 or MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A series of workshops for graduate business students which provide foundation and supplemental skill development in such areas as computer usage, business writing, career development, communications, presentations, negotiations, ethical behavior, and market-based thinking. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. FLD
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This two day session is a total immersion into successful presentations. Participants learn new ways to develop a winning presentation strategy; learn and practice a proven organizational method; and get valuable individual tips on how to successfully deliver the right message. Each participant delivers four short presentations to the class. Each of those four presentations is video recorded (for the participants use) and the instructor provides private, one-on-one feedback and coaching after each presentation. A continuation of MGMT 706 Professional Development Skills I. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: MGMT 706 or consent of department. FLD
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This course emphasizes an exploration of ideas about leadership that are practice-oriented. The material covered is based primarily on ethnographic and clinical inquiry rather than social scientific research. A central theme of this material, some of which is philosophical in nature, is the focus on learning and the role of reflection in both the leadership process itself and in the process of developing leaders. Varieties of topics are covered, including foresight, intuition, practical reason, critical thinking, reflective practice, and ethical judgment. A key goal is to move the student into a position where he or she can begin to take control of their own leadership development process. The course is structured so as to give students the opportunity to reflect on their experiences, analyze those experiences using the conceptual material, and then enter into systematic dialogue on these issues with other students and the instructor. The ultimate product of this learning process is the creation of a detailed personal leadership development plan. Prerequisite: MGMT 701 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course examines the evolving concept of management and explores various theories and methods for managing organizations. This course has three purposes: (1) to provide access to important ideas and issues facing general managers, (2) to help the students integrate their knowledge and expand their vision about managing organizations, and (3) to provide a forum for discussion of the issues, challenges, and opportunities lying ahead in a career in management. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course examines the mechanisms the organization uses to respond to and initiate changes in its internal and external environments. Specific processes include organization development (OD), intervention theory and research, organizational effectiveness, a variety of proactive change strategies, and the role of the change agent. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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The objective of this course is to help students build an understanding of how competitive strategy may lead to the creation and persistence of competitive advantage in diversified firms. In contrast to the core Strategic Management (MGMT 704) course, which is designed to address how firms develop competitive advantage in a single market, this course will analyze how advantage can be created through the configuration and coordination of activities across multiple markets. Examples of corporate strategies include vertical integration, cooperative alliances, corporate diversification, mergers and acquisitions, and so forth. Prerequisite: MGMT 704 recommended. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A study of advanced topics in various subfields of Management of Organizations. The course focus, content, and approach will depend upon the particular topics to be covered. Repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: Variable. LEC
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Competitive Analysis and Strategy deals with issues of competition and the formulation of competitive strategy towards creating long-term economic value. This course develops a framework for evaluating industry structures and understanding the dynamics of competition, combining rigor with relevance and applicability. Topics covered include nature of markets and competition, economic value creation, analysis of industries, customers and competitors, identification of capabilities and core competencies, alternative positioning strategies that create value in different environments and factors that lead to the erosion of competitive advantage. In addition, discussion will center around how firms can achieve "dynamic fit," developing a self-renewing organization that encourages entrepreneurial behavior critical to the formulation and implementation of value creating strategies. LEC
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Management of Technology-I will focus on the role played by technology in the strategic management of firms, both in high technology and low technology industries. The use of technology as a major source of competitive advantages, both in terms of new products and processes, and the impact of technology on organizational forms will be discussed. The concept of technology strategy and the role of value creation will be elaborated. The course will make extensive use of cases to illustrate the key concepts. Topics covered include: Technological environment; Schumpeterian competition and creative destruction, innovation and diffusion; Industry evolution and market development triggered by technological developments; Technology-induced organizational changes: from craft production to mass customization; Technology strategy: acquisition, deployment, and utilization, new venture development. LEC
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Management of Technology - II: Technology and Operations will focus on the role of technology in management of operations of a company. Research and Development, New Product Development, Operations and the linkages among them will be detailed. Key organizational issues such as business processes, core process designs, and organization of R&D and scientific laboratories will be discussed. Information technology as a source of organizational change and adaptation will be summarized. Topics covered include: R&D strategy, alliances and management; new product development; QFD, benchmarking, and early manufacturing involvement; methods to speed up cycle time, concurrent engineering, outsourcing and lead user analysis; manufacturing flexibility, strategy and value chain analysis; Business Processes, core process design; organization of R&D laboratories and new venture departments; IT and reengineering. LEC
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The course will focus on the principles and methods of implementing strategies, both at the business unit and corporate levels. Environment, technology, and strategy will be discussed as the primary drivers of organization structure, processes, and systems. Cultural and development change processes for realigning organization's strategy structure, processes, and systems will be detailed. The role of the general manager as the architect of change will be highlighted. Topics covered include: M-form organization, transaction costs, agency theory; behavior and output control; Coordination mechanisms: organization design, information systems design, and reward systems; Organizational change, technostructural and human process change; Cultural change processes. MGMT 704 preferred. LEC
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This course will focus on causes, forms, and consequences of corporate restructuring. Four major forms of restructuring: ownership and corporate governance, financial restructuring, reorientation of corporate and business strategies, and IT driven reengineering will be discussed. The course will make extensive use of cases and readings. Topics covered include: market for corporate control, mergers and acquisitions, defensive and offensive strategies; ESOPS, leveraged buyouts and partnerships; Financial restructuring, bankruptcy, IPO, debt-equity swaps; Diversification strategies; conglomerate, related and others; business strategies, turnaround, downsizing, and layering; reengineering. LEC
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Theories, concepts, and principles of Strategic Management will be applied to a specific industry or industries to enable better understanding of both the industry(ies) and how strategies are developed and perform in that industry. Each student will research a firm in the industry with the objective of uncovering its historical and projected strategic approach to the industry and present the findings to the class. Research materials will include both hard copy and on-line business reference material developed through on-line information searches. Field projects may be required depending upon availability of sites. Projects would then require travel to the site at other than regular class times. See the instructor for details. Prerequisite: Completion of MGMT 704 or equivalent and possession of on line information search skills for LEXIS/NEXIS and other electronic information sources, in addition to traditional library research skills. LEC
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An investigation into the obligations of business as a corporate citizen with special attention paid to current and topical problems. Topics discussed include the efficiency of business as an agent of social change, public expectations for the role of business, and the adequacy of business's performance. Not open to students with credit in MGMT 486. LEC
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