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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Business courses

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(F) The objective of this course is to improve the teaching effectiveness of the participants. Highly effective teachers demonstrate their teaching techniques and discuss the reasons underlying their actions. School of Business Ph.D. students are required to take this seminar during the first semester in which they are the instructor of record for a course. LEC
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The major objectives of this doctoral level course on the responsible conduct of research are to build students' abilities to analyze ethical issues, and to expose students in advance to various issues that may arise while engaging in the research endeavor. Issues will be covered that arise in such areas as research design, data collection and management, the use of human subjects, data analysis, authorship, publication, peer review, and other aspects of professional practice. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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An introduction to statistical inference techniques with emphasis on the application of these techniques to decision making in a firm. Topics include probability theory, random variables, probability distribution functions, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression, correlation, and introduction to statistical process control. Corequisite: Calculus II and IST 301. LEC
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An introduction to decision making under the uncertainty encountered in business and in everyday life. Covers selected topics in probability, statistics, economics, and operations research, and their application to complex problems in financial management, marketing, operations management, supply chain management, and quality management; as well as risks affecting everyday life, such as personal decisions in regard to career, marriage, and wealth management. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A further study of problems encountered in production from a managerial perspective employing the methodology of management science. Topics included in the course are location of facilities, design of product lines, replacement of facilities, quality control, production planning, production and inventory control, and scheduling. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Decision making under uncertainty and resource allocation models were introduced in DSCI 310. These topics will be covered in greater depth in this course. Applications of these models to complex problems in business will be emphasized. Cases illustrating the use of these models will also be covered. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in decision sciences not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to data gathering and analysis with an emphasis on problem solving for decision making and process improvement in a business setting. The role of numerical data in the understanding of business problems and in the evaluation of planned improvements is studied, along with the study of variation commonly occurring in business processes and methods of reducing this variation. Statistical software is used to supplement data analysis and aid in the problem solving. Topics covered may include statistical methods such as exploratory data analysis, graphical analysis, Pareto analysis, stratification analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, linear regression, and control charts. LEC
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This course examines the business from an operations mindset. Topics covered include supplier relationships, JIT and OPT, quality, customer-focus, and manufacturing as a competitive advantage. A systems integration view will be stressed instead of a functional view. Prerequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A survey of forecasting methods and application. Essential concepts underlying these methods are discussed, including cost and performance characteristics. Criteria for selection of appropriate methods are developed. Issues concerning effective utilization for forecasting in several corporate planning situations are considered. Prerequisite: IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will take a closer look at various aspects of the total quality theory and its practices. Particular attention will be paid to the foundations of total quality theory including Deming's 14 principles of management and key tenants of Juran and Crosby. Additional topics include an examination of the continual improvement process in theory and action, strategies for getting started, and issues to address during a transformation into a total quality model of operation. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to management principles supporting the concept that a primary goal of a business is to meet the needs of its customers. To accomplish this goal, organizations must design, build, and deliver products and services that meet customer needs in a resource effective manner. Topics covered include the role of the customer, the nature of process improvement in meeting customer needs in a cost effective manner, the view of the organization as a system, the reduction of variation in all organizational processes, the nature of continual organizational learning, and the responsibilities of management in this approach. LEC
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This course will cover theories of decision making under uncertainty and competition. Examples of topics that may be covered are Bayesian decision theory, game theory, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making. Automated aids for decision making such as expert systems may also be covered. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 and DSCI 702, or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course deals with process improvement through the reduction and control of variation in business organizations. The result of reduced variation is an improvement of integral organizational functions, a reduction of costs, and a minimization of defects in the market place. Data driven improvement is emphasized. Topics covered include advanced discussion of using control charts for process improvement, and the use of designed experiments in process improvement. Particular emphasis will be given to methods used to analyze a given process, to the use of statistical tools to stabilize an entire process, to understand the natural variability in process output and to reducing process variation. Prerequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will examine the major manufacturing and the operating strategies used by firms today. A partial list of these strategies include quality improvement, theory of constraints, just-in-time, and manufacturing planning and control systems. Pros and cons of each strategy will be discussed. Implementation issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of decision science to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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(F) This course covers the basic theory of probability and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the business school. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing and two semesters of calculus, or consent of instructor. LEC
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(S) This course covers the basic theory of statistics and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: DSCI 920. LEC
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This course presents various statistical tools for undertaking quantitative research in business. The regression model under the full ideal conditions is discussed, along with methodological issues that arise when these ideal conditions are violated, as often occurs in business research. A high degree of theoretical rigor is maintained, along with an emphasis on practical applications through the use of assignments that require data analysis. Prerequisite: DSCI 921 or consent of instructor. LEC
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(V) This course will cover advanced topics in probability and statistics with application to various business disciplines. Topics covered may vary and will depend on the instructor. Examples of topics that may be covered are time series models, stochastic processes, uncertainty in artificial intelligence, multivariate statistics, etc. Prerequisite: DSCI 920 and DSCI 921, or consent of instructor. LEC
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(V) This course will cover basic and advanced topics in optimization theory and applications. Examples of topics that may be covered are linear programming, nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, multiple-criteria decision making, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making and game theory. Prerequisite: Linear algebra and real analysis or consent of instructor. LEC
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The seminar will discuss current research in management science topics such as artificial intelligence, statistics, optimization, decision making, decision support systems, and production/operations management. Topics covered will reflect the research interests of the instructor and participants. Participants are required to lead the discussion for at least one paper of their choice. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new ventures financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Prerequisite: ENTR 301 and ENTR 302. LEC
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This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Prerequisite: ENTR 303. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of entrepreneurship topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. Learning will be achieved by both study and discussion of key entrepreneurial business issues as well as the critical appraisal of new venture business plans as presented in the text. Readings in entrepreneurship and case studies, contained in the text as well as in video presentations, will be used to illustrate the essential entrepreneurial management issues. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course builds upon the foundation created by the Introduction to Entrepreneurship course. It will provide the student with two learning opportunities: first, it details the critical success factors of starting a new venture, growing it and finally harvesting it profitably; secondly, this course will provide hands-on instruction regarding the development of a complete and compelling business plan. Students will work as teams on the development of a business plan for the purposes of commercializing an innovative business concept or KU lab-sourced technology. These student teams will also present and defend their business plans at various venues including intercollegiate competitions for the purposes of improving their team interaction skills, their presentation capabilities. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on the development of new business ideas for new or established organizations, creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry, potential customers, market segment, barriers to entry and competitor set. The development of each of these subjects will lead to a feasibility analysis which each student will prepare for his/her chosen new venture. This course will also examine the development of the optimal sales and distribution. Additionally, the course will provide an understanding of how to translate the product/service idea to the business concept and marketing positioning. Lastly, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing communications program. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course looks at the unique aspects of owning and managing a small business, family business or franchise, with the owners having close control over operations and management decisions. Students will examine the startup options of buying, starting, or franchising; operations and human resources management; the unique factors of the family business; marketing, including setting prices, choosing a location, developing competitive advantage, positioning, and promotion with limited resources; financial statements, accounting systems, financing, cash flow and the working-capital cycle; and exit through selling, bequeathing, or dissolving the business. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to help the student apply the models and theories learned in previous courses in practical application to actual entrepreneurial challenges. These challenges will be presented to the student in either a simulated online environment or via the development and solution delivery of an actual small business/entrepreneurial business challenge. The environment in which the students will operate will be determined by the inventory of projects with entrepreneurs which are available at the time of the course offering. In the simulated environment, teams of entrepreneurs, each with defined but rotating roles and responsibilities, will assess the continually changing business challenge, supervise the collection of appropriate operating revenue and cost data, obtain input from `direct reports/supplier' (their teammates) and make the decisions which must consider all disciplines of the business. Each of the team's decisions will be measured via its impact on the venture's income statement, balance sheet and cash flow position. The student will be graded on his/her team's ability to increase the venture's net worth. In the real world environment, student entrepreneurial teams will be challenged with a live project the solution to which will provide both a meaningful experiential learning opportunity for the students and a demonstrable beneficial impact on the venture. Students in project teams will be assigned to entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs or small business owners operating in the region to address and solve specific business challenges which those dynamic organizations are confronting. Students will define problems in management, marketing, finance, information management, ethical decision-making and operations strategies as they apply to small and entrepreneurial businesses. In addition to solving a typical entrepreneurial business problem, students will have the opportunity to interact with actual entrepreneurs and witness first hand the challenges which these businesses confront regularly, both during the project and in the final, culminating project presentation to the business owners/management. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 (MGMT 475). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in entrepreneurship not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Enrollment restricted. RSH
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new venture's financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
View current sections...
This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Not open to students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: ENTR 703. LEC
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This course will focus on identifying and evaluating the business opportunity, the strategies to be developed and implemented as well as entrepreneurial capabilities required for marketplace success. Development of a robust and compelling business concept will be emphasized. Analyses of the industry, competition, the new business points of strategic leverage, creation of an effective business model and funding strategies will be studied. Financing the new venture, sourcing and structuring the required deal capital will be explored and attention to managing rapid growth and exit strategies will be provided. This course is not open to students with credit in ENTR 450. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of entrepreneurship to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. Not open to students who have taken FIN 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. The course will include the preparation of a basic investment portfolio and brief presentation as to its merits. Not open to students who have taken FIN 101. LEC
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This course acquaints students with the financial institutions. Topics include a review of major international, national, regional money center institutions, investment management and other related institutions. The management and key revenue generators for these institutions will also be discussed. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course acquaints students with the careers in financial institutions. Topics include: careers in major international, national, and regional money center institutions; ethical issues related to financial careers; a comparison of recruiting practices in investment banks, investment management, and corporate finance positions. Placement and recruiting practices in those institutions would be reviewed. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to help the student develop a basic understanding of Finance. Topics covered include (1) financial instruments and the markets in which they are traded, (2) financial planning and analysis, (3) the cost and time-value of money, and (4) the fundamentals of investor decision-making. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 310.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101, MATH 101 and ACCT 200 or ACCT 205. LEC
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This course consists of the analysis of problems relating to estimating the financial needs of an enterprise and to evaluating the alternative means of providing and utilizing both temporary and permanent capital. The relationship of current financial decisions with financial policy is analyzed from the viewpoint of management and the stockholder. Prerequisite: Prior completion of ACCT 200; prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of investments. Financial instruments such as common stocks, bonds, options, futures, and mutual funds are analyzed in a theoretical context using efficient market theory, capital market theory, option pricing, and stock valuation models. Experience in practical applications is generally obtained through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Building on the concepts of present value, the focus of this course is on the theory of and methods for corporate asset selection. The course includes coverage of important technical issues such as risk analysis, evaluation of mutually exclusive projects, capital rationing, and leasing. Some attention usually will be devoted to the topic of project financing. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Apply finance principles to measure and manage the value of companies using a professional's step-by-step approach. In this course, students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They also forecast accounting statements, compare absolute and relative valuation techniques, and evaluate restructuring opportunities and potential flexibility options. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The economic determinants of exchange rates are discussed. This is followed by an examination of the financing problems faced by the multinational corporation and the international portfolio manager, arising from the international nature of their environment. Topics include spot, forward, futures, and options markets in foreign currency, international risk management, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, covered interest arbitrage, and contemporary issues in international financial management. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines the use of forwards, futures, SWAPs options, and related financial derivatives for hedging arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation issues, and the techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Explores (a) the financial institutions that channel funds from savers to borrowers, (b) the financial instruments that facilitate those flows, and (c) the financial markets in which those instruments are traded. Equal attention is paid to money markets, bond markets, stock markets, mortgage markets, foreign exchange markets, and derivatives markets. Commercial banking receives special emphasis, but investment banks, thrift institutions, insurance companies, finance companies, mutual funds, securities brokerages, and mortgage brokers are also studied, as well as fringe financial such as payday lenders and pawn shops. The course closes with an introduction to risk management at financial intermediaries. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An in-depth study of commercial banking. The primary focus is the value maximization of the bank, given the legal, technological, macro-economics, and competitive constraints facing bank managers. The course emphasizes bank investment decisions (e.g., underwriting loans), financing decisions (e.g., generating deposits, capital adequacy), and risk-management decisions (hedging interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and foreign exchange risk). Ongoing changes in financial markets, information technology, and government regulations, and the importance of these changes for banking business strategies, are stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: FIN 430 or co-enrollment in FIN 430. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The central focus of study is on the role of insurance in business and society. The approach is, in general, from the standpoint of the person confronted with problems of risk management and loss prevention in coping with insurable (pure) risk situations. The course is designed to further the ability of the student to analyze and evaluate programs undertaken to control the loss of income which results from the destruction of property values. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is an introduction to bond markets and bond derivatives. Bonds and associated financial derivatives include securities that promise a fixed income stream and by extension all securities whose valuation and hedging are related to interest rates. The objective of this course is to provide students with a guide to financial markets, institutions and instruments associated with debt funds and help them to understand the determinants of the general level and structure of interest rates. The focus of this course is on the concepts and tools that are useful to understand and interpret real world issues related to debt markets. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted LEC
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This course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Prerequisite: Fin 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Investors construct portfolios by choosing allocations across asset classes and by selecting funds or managers within each asset class. This course will (1) examine methods to forecast return and risk across asset classes, including fixed income, equities, real assets, venture capital, buyouts, and hedge fund strategies, (2) describe ways to evaluate the performance of fund managers relative to appropriate benchmarks, and (3) consider optimal allocations among fund managers in various asset classes. Prerequisite: FIN 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as SCM 418.) Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This is a course about corporate "deals" - corporate transactions that change who owns a business or who controls it. Naturally, the course covers classical mergers and acquisitions, including the financial, strategic and regulatory issues. However, it also covers corporate governance and control, IPO's (initial public offerings), financial distress, and venture capital and private equity. Finally, deals require deal-makers - the investment bankers. We'll touch on aspects of investment banking, an industry that majors in finance and MBA's often work in or have contact with. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A purpose of this course is to offer a well-rounded exposure to the theory and practice of security analysis. The course emphasizes the usefulness of sound investment theory as a backdrop for understanding asset pricing in dynamic financial markets. The course forms a bridge between a student's initial exposure to investment theory and the practice of stock selection and active portfolio management. Prerequisite: FIN 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The entrepreneurial finance course will focus on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies (start-ups). The objective is for the students to learn how to make investment and financing decisions (and how to distinguish good from bad investments) in an environment characterized by very high degrees of uncertainty and information asymmetry. We will address this topic from two distinct perspectives: the perspective of users (entrepreneurs) and suppliers (venture capitalists and other private equity investors) of capital. In the beginning of the semester we will first take the perspective of the individual entrepreneur (or manager). We will focus on identifying good ideas (evaluating projects using different valuation techniques), separating them from bad ideas, and placing a quantitative value on these opportunities. This part will review different valuation methods used to value start-up companies. We will also deal with issues such as forecasting cash flows of a start-up firm and ways to grow the firm using internal resources. Then we will turn our attention to the next step in the entrepreneurial process - raising capital to take advantage of good opportunities. Specifically we will consider venture capital (independent venture capitalists, angels, and corporate venture capitalists) as a source of financing for start-ups. This part will provide overview of the venture capital industry (players, organizational forms, contracting) and introduce students to the challenges of structuring venture capital deals. In addition, we will cover other ways of raising capital to aid the growth of the entrepreneurial firm. The focus will be on the private debt market as well as other alternative sources of financing for start-up firms (SBA loans, SBICs, mezzanine financing, L/Cs, etc.). Finally, we will study the ways to harvest the ventures (IPOs, acquisitions, LBOs). Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course will have three primary objectives. First, students will review basic valuation methods, including instruction on the location of relevant resources. Some advanced valuation techniques will be examined, e.g., APV, multiples and capital cash flow. Finally, students will work to apply these techniques to particular corporate financial decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in finance not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to give students increased practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Students will analyze portfolio decisions and determine the risk/reward profile of the portfolio. The student will apply many different valuation models to current and potential equity holdings in the portfolio. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an overview of the problems associated with the financial management of business firms. The focus is on the practices followed by managers in raising and investing capital so as to maximize value. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. LEC
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Adopting the perspective of the CFO, this course focuses on the problems and opportunities, analytic methods, and solutions in the businesses' (1) working capital management, (2) long-term capital investments, and (3) financing. The unifying theme involves balancing expected return and risk in order to maximize the financial value of the enterprise. LEC
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This course provides a framework for describing the nature of securities markets. The focus is on efficient markets, capital markets, and portfolio theory. Through the use of theoretical models, students gain an understanding of the methods and techniques utilized by the professional investor and portfolio manager. Not open to students with credit in FIN 410. Prerequisite: FIN 701 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course emphasizes the applications aspects of investments. Various valuation methods are applied to securities of different types with emphasis on bonds, common stocks, options and futures. Case studies are often used to convey key concepts and strategies. Not open to students with credit in FIN 410. Prerequisite: FIN 705 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on the principal elements of theoretical and practical controversies in the area of financial institutions. Contemporary issues facing these institutions in conjunction with historical and evolutionary developments are a hallmark of the course. Not open to students with credit in FIN 430. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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This course stresses the practical applications of real estate analysis that can be drawn from theoretical foundations to assist the real estate manager in long-range planning. Particular emphasis is placed on real estate valuation, financing, conveyance, tax consequences of ownership and the role of government in real estate. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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Apply finance principles to measure and manage the value of companies using a professional's step-by-step approach. In this course, students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They also forecast accounting statements, compare absolute and relative valuation techniques, and evaluate restructuring opportunities and potential flexibility options. Not open to students with credit in FIN 400/417 Business Valuation. Prerequisite: FIN 701. (Recommended: FIN 745 and FIN 746). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account for the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis for inclusion or exclusion in the portfolio. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 450; FIN 410 substitutes for FIN 705 as a prerequisite. Enrollment by application only. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The economic determinants of exchange rates are discussed. This is followed by an examination of the financing problems faced by the multinational corporation and the international portfolio manager, arising from the international nature of their environment. Topics can include split, forward, futures, and options markets in foreign currency, international risk management, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, covered interest arbitrage, and contemporary issues in international financial management. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 420. Prerequisite: FIN 701 and BE 702 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course examines the use of forwards, futures, SWAPs, and related financial derivatives for hedging, arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation, mechanics, valuation, and management techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 425. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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This course examines the use of options and related financial derivatives for hedging, arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation, mechanics, valuation, and management techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 425. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the evaluation of fixed asset investment opportunities. Important topics are: cash flow analysis, estimation of required rates of return, risk analysis, and long-term investment analysis. Not open to students with credit in FIN 468. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or 415 or 701 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the theory and practice of how businesses raise funds. Important topics are: long-term capital markets and sources of long-term financing, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, and a variety of long-term financing problems. Not open to students with credit in FIN 468. Prerequisite: FIN 745 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies. A mixture of lectures and cases is used to expose students to various topics in entrepreneurial finance. Topics include identifying good opportunities, placing a quantitative value on these opportunities by using different valuation techniques (discounted cash flows, relative valuation, and the Venture Capital method), overview of the venture capital (VC) industry, VC contracting, analysis of term sheets, raising capital from angel investors and corporate venture capitalists. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 466. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies. A mixture of lectures and cases is used to expose students to various topics in entrepreneurial finance. Topics include financing start-ups through private debt and government sources, mezzanine financing, using strategic alliances as an alternative way to fund start-ups, overview of venture capital in developed countries and emerging markets, harvesting the new ventures through an initial public offering, merger, or a buyout, and the challenges associated with each exit venue. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 466. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from across the finance discipline will be covered. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, and personal finance will be used to demonstrate modeling. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 and FIN 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of finance to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course provides a seminar format for a discussion of the currently prevalent research topics, methods, and problems being addressed in the area of finance. All first year PhD students in finance will enroll in this course their first semester in the doctoral program. LEC
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(S) This course is designed primarily for doctoral candidates in business administration. The basic Classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models are explored, along with extensions of these models. Concentration is placed on the role of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies, and the dialogues concerning stabilization policy, the unemployment-inflation tradeoff, wealth effects, rational expectations, and international policy issues. The focus is on a comparative static analysis of equilibrium, and the stability of equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 522 and MATH 115 and (MATH 116 or MATH 121), or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to develop the students' analytical abilities. Course material is of a theoretical and empirical nature. Advanced topics in financial management of business firms are covered. Special emphasis is given to long-term financing topics. Prerequisite: FIN 705 (BUS 751) and FIN 706 (BUS 752). LEC
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A study of advanced topics in investments, capital markets, and portfolio theory. Special emphasis is given to the theory of efficient markets. The course is designed to cover recent analytical and empirical literature in the investment area. Prerequisite: FIN 710 (BUS 753). LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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