All schools & programs > College of Liberal Arts and Sciences >

Latin American Area Studies Program

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Latin American Area Studies courses

Show courses in LAA with a course number to
worth in .

There are 23 results.

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as ANTH 379,.) LEC
View current sections...
Although approximately 600 indigenous languages are spoken by 30 million people in Latin America, public life is conducted in Spanish. The class provides a comprehensive survey of language issues in Latin America by analyzing the situation of minority language groups, language rights, language policies, and language planning, as well as by considering the questions that arise regarding bilingual education, literacy, and the role of minority languages in educational systems. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study and research under faculty direction. Open to students wishing to graduate with honors in Latin American Studies and having a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Latin American Studies and at least 3.25 overall. Requires an interdisciplinary project concerning a specific topic involving at least two disciplines. Must be directed by a faculty member in Latin American Studies, approved by the Center Associate Director, and defended before a committee of at least three faculty members. To earn departmental honors, a student must take the course for two semesters (with a minimum grade of B the first semester, and an A the second). LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. IND
View current sections...
Examines the sociolinguistic issues of multilingual countries in Latin America from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include but are not limited to linguistic inequality, the language of politics, language and education, urban and rural linguistic interaction, and indigenous and creole languages. Prerequisite: A liberal arts course with Latin American content. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major narrative trends including Amerindian languages and the analysis of "indigenista" literature. The African substratum of Latin American culture and its relation to concepts such as "marvelous realism" is explored. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are investigated as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The influence of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on their emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores the relationship between political development and cultural phenomena of Latin America from 1800 to the present, with special emphasis on gender, popular culture, and ideology. The influences of 20th-century ideologies and technology on cultural development in Latin America will also be examined. LEC
View current sections...
This course follows the development of U.S. Latino and Latin American cinema from its origins to the present and its relationship with literary discourse. U.S. Latino/Latin American cinema can be seen as a specific practice that cannot be reduced in all its manifestations to the institutional mode of production of the dominant Hollywood model. The course examines the creation of a national cinema that seems to be more dependent on a literary canon. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are explored as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The impact of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on the emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 379 or LAA 334. LEC
View current sections...
This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as ANTH 665 and WGSS 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours course work in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or Latin American Studies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of bibliographic and reference sources for research on Latin America in the humanities and social sciences. Designed to prepare students for library research at the seminar, thesis, or dissertation level. Prerequisite: Junior standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary seminar incorporating significant and pertinent materials from the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature. Required of all graduate students enrolled in the Master of Arts program in Latin American Area Studies. Prerequisite: LAA 700 (may be taken simultaneously with LAA 701 if both courses offered during same semester). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Brazil, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Brazilian Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Central America and Mexico, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Central America & Mexico Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Spanish. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation and research of interdisciplinary topics in Latin American Studies. RSH
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
View current sections...

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.