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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An advanced course in photography specifically dealing with the skills and techniques of the professional architectural photographer. Students will use and experiment with large format photography, manipulation of the exposure and development process, special developers and processes; negative retouching, specialized film and their application, simulation, model photography, and photographic rendering. Brochure development, marketing services, and professional ethics will also be discussed. Prerequisite: ARCH 618 or equivalent, submission of a brochure, and consent of instructor. LAB
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This course will provide opportunities for students to learn about research methods in the realm of architectural materials. The course will have two concurrent phases: the first phase will consist of a series of field trips to materials manufacturers, fabricators and distributors in the Lawrence, Topeka and Kansas City area. The purpose of these trips is to see, first-hand, how materials are developed and made, and to understand the research involved in their development. The second phase will consist of a self-directed research project based on the students' natural curiosity about a particular material or process. The project will have three components: 1) a research agenda, rigorously developed and executed; and 2) a "built" component, with actual materials, executed by the students' own hands and financial resources; and 3) final documentation of the research project. LEC
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The building technology practicum is offered as a course that will afford students a "real world" experience outside of the academic setting. Students can bring their own project proposals to the practicum committee or faculty members on the committee can suggest local preservation efforts, including planning and administration, or actual physical implementation of such projects. It could also be in the interest of some students to develop skills in a specific area, i.e. model building, architectural photography, historic reconstruction, or technical documentation. Those interested in specific areas will need to work closely with the practicum committee to develop a working list of goals and objectives. Students can elect to work individually or in teams, can work outside of the semester schedule with grades assigned at the completion of the project, and will be bound by a contract approved by the practicum committee. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 524, with focus on applying learned principles to basic contemporary structural systems such as concrete, steel, and wood framing systems. Open to architecture students only. Prerequisite: ARCH 524 or ARCH 620 and ARCH 621. LEC
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Analysis of statically indeterminate beams and frames. Fundamentals of structural design in concrete and steel. Open to architecture students only. Prerequisite: ARCH 624. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the materials, processes and craft of construction. Along with presenting the information required for understanding the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of construction systems and assemblies, the course also provides a conceptual framework to bridge between the physical conditions of construction and the more abstract processes of design. Teaching method includes modeling and hands-on building experiences. Prerequisite: ARCH 200 or ARCH 209 or Corequisite: ARCH 408 or ARCH 409 or ARCH 503. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 626. Introduction to industrialized production. A consideration of the detailed sub-systems and cultural practices that comprise the built environment, and the factors responsible for their design and installation. Includes discussion of building codes, mechanisms of failure, and materials selection. Lectures and demonstrations by the instructors and visitors, films, slide projections, quizzes and written examinations. A student should demonstrate an understanding of elementary systems of construction and be able to relate this understanding to the design process. Prerequisite: ARCH 626. LEC
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The course deals with the historical development of structure, first in nature and then in architecture. In nature, the course discusses the evolution of structural materials, systems, connections and anchorage (foundations) in geological structure, botanical structure, endoskeleton structure, exoskeleton structure and insect architecture. The course then analyzes the growth of structure from anthropological structure through ancient and medieval structure to modern architecture. In these broad architectural periods in world history, the course examines the structural materials, structural behavior and construction of some of the important buildings that helped to define and delineate the architecture of their time. This course helps students to understand structural systems and their behavior, in a non-mathematical way, by relating the structural principles involved to our common experience of the world around us. The course will have every student do a research project on an assigned topic in geological structure, botanical structure, exoskeleton structure, insect architecture or anthropological structure. LEC
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This course has the objectives of introducing the art and science of "listening" to architectural spaces; exploring, from both historical and current viewpoints, how proper acoustical conditions have and can be realized within the aesthetic and functional parameters of the particular architectural space; understanding the importance of building acoustics in architectural design; obtaining the ability to discuss building acoustics with the proper use of acoustical terms and descriptions; and understanding the basics of how sound behaves in an enclosed architectural space. The course will include several visits to existing architectural spaces that have specific acoustical requirements and interesting acoustical characteristics. LEC
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An examination of architectural theories that understand the designed environment as a cultural medium and product of a sociocultural process that expresses values and ideas. Understanding of these theories will be enhanced through the analysis of paradigmatic buildings, urban form and ideologies that have influenced architectural culture. LEC
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This class focuses the student on directed readings and provides the student the opportunity to select a topic for the semester's duration. With a very crammed schedule, the student is given a venue to concentrate on issues that they wish to pursue. A seminal reading is provided to the class, at the beginning of the semester, and this reading forms the basis of the semester's discussion. The selected reading is "current" and is the device used to distribute other readings pertinent to the author's argument. The basis of selection is related to current thought and discourse affecting the evolving nature of architectural culture. Class discussion may include slides, videos, sound tapes, etc. These are intended to complement the assigned readings. LEC
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This course introduces the student to contemporary trends in French architecture. Social, technological, economic, and theoretical perspectives will be investigated, and the work of the major French architects of the latter half of the twentieth century will be studied in depth. This course supplements the Paris studio program. LEC
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This course emphasizes architectural trends of the twentieth century, which have been influenced by significant technological advances. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the achievements and failures of architectural concepts that were influenced by modern technology. Examples will be drawn primarily from buildings and architects in Western Europe and North America. LEC
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Ideas of symmetry, harmony, proportion, and ideal form have long been used by architectural theorists and practitioners as a way of translating a traditional knowledge of the world into architectural form. Such traditional knowledge is embedded in the mathematics of Pythagoras, the philosophy of Plato, and the four part study of the cosmos (known in Western thought as "the quadrivium"--arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy). This course will entail the study of selected readings in this intellectual tradition as well as the analysis of buildings as they relate to the concepts learned through this study. Prerequisite: ARCH 641, History of Architecture II: Renaissance, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course explores the relationship between architecture and the liberal arts and sciences through the principle of isomorphic correspondence--a term from Gestalt psychology to describe similar structures occurring in different media. Emphasis on the historical connections to music and on aesthetic principles on the natural sciences. Prerequisite: Six hours of architectural history or consent of instructor for non-majors. LEC
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A study of contemporary or historical trends in architecture which relate to the development of individual or broad philosophies of architecture. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the development of concepts and practices of retrieving, recycling, and curating the built environment from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. After a series of introductory readings and discussions, students are encouraged to investigate particular environmental, technological, social, or ideological questions of their choice, focusing on structures that demonstrate persistence over great distances and, co-existing with this persistence, ability to accommodate changes over time. LEC
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This is a 5-week course covering an introduction to the design-build method of project delivery, highlighting the role of architect as leader of the design-build team. The course covers team structure; ethical issues; forming a design-build firm; project management; licensing, corporate and insurance issues; public design-build laws and bridging. LEC
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This is a 10-week course covering a more advanced examination of the design-build method of project delivery, highlighting the role of architect as leader of the design-build team. The course covers team structure; ethical issues; forming a design-build firm; project management; licensing, corporate and insurance issues; public design-build laws and bridging; as well as history, architect-as-prime contractor, architect-as-subcontractor, business issues and marketing, bonding, design-build contracts, cost estimating and OSHA, risks and legal liabilities. LEC
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The intent of this five-week course is to provide a forum for the examination of varied aspects of the architect-client relationship. Components of this relationship will be explored both from the point of view of the practicing architect and of the project owner or client. LEC
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The intent of this five week course is to provide a forum for the examination of the wide range of career options that are open to architects. The positive impact, to both the built environment and society as a whole that architects in alternative roles are ideally suited to provide, will be explored. LEC
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This course is designed to develop an understanding of the underpinnings of ethical reasoning including the structure and vocabulary of moral argumentation; apply this knowledge to common ethical issues confounding contemporary architects, demonstrated through presentations and interaction with leading Kansas City architects, interactive analysis of case studies, participatory discussions, reading comprehension and analytical writing. LEC
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This course will introduce the concepts, methods, techniques, and information used by the architect to establish the parameters of a project, prior to entering the formal design process. The content will introduce the core competencies in programming, site, and environmental analysis required by the profession. Programming theory, research techniques, information analysis, evaluation of significance, and creative synthesis of the multivalent factors acting upon the pre-design process of project definition will be covered. Site analyses will include urban places as well as less developed, more rural locations. Exercises may include programming and analysis of projects and sites assigned in the Architectural Design Studio sequence. Prerequisite: ARCH 408 and ARCH 409 or ARCH 505. LEC
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This course will explore eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth-century American landscape design including gardens, estates, rural cemeteries, campuses, suburbs, urban parks, and national parks, as well as the beginnings of landscape architecture as a profession. Topics of inquiry will include European contributions in landscape theory, practice, and aesthetics, and American adaptations in response to climatic, social, and political differences. An important focus will be whether one can look at a designed landscape and see the expression of an attitude toward nature. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to investigate the relationships between the American culture and the resulting built and natural landscape. Issues of building types, public places, and land use arrangements will be studied from a socio-historical perspective. (Same as UBPL 662.) LEC
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The seminar explores the influence of the natural historians Alexander von Humboldt and Charles Darwin on American writings in landscape architecture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The original texts of Humboldt (including Aspects of Nature and Cosmos) and Darwin (including On the Origin of Species and Insectivorous Plants), will be studied in conjunction with significant authors in landscape architecture including A. J. Downing, George Perkins Marsh, Frederick Law Olmsted, Horace William Shaler Cleveland, Mariana Griswold van Rensselaer, Jens Jensen, Garrett Eckbo, Daniel Kiley, and James C. Rose. The emerging ideas of conservation and ecology found in these works will also be examined. LEC
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An exploration of the evolution of cities through the cultural and spatial development of human settlement patterns. The role of cities in the transformations of human culture from tribal communities to post industrial society is defined in terms of the historical origins of urban institutions and functions and their transformation into spatial structure and physical form. LEC
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This course will focus on the application of electronic spreadsheets in the management of project fees, company staffing, and business cash flow. Topics covered include spreadsheet linkage, creation of lookup tables, data consolidation, writing macros and charting results. LEC
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This course focuses on the development of database applications to track the information generated during the normal course of business operations. Topics include database design, table creation, queries, forms, reports, and macros. LEC
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This course uses software packages to manage a simulated design project. The topics in this section include creating tasks and linkages, assigning and managing resources, monitoring a project and creating reports. LEC
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This course covers the use of various software packages in the development of on-screen and hard-copy presentations. Topics include presentation design, importing graphics, output strategies, and communications techniques. LEC
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This course focuses on the use of electronic data communications in operating a design organization. Topics include use of the Internet, electronic research, telecommunication technologies and remote access. LEC
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This course focuses on the development of graphic images. Students are taught to generate vector-based graphics and bit-mapped images that can be incorporated into various software packages. LEC
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The application of Information Technology to Facility Management has changed a formerly basement operation into a center of corporate support. In this course, we explore the use of Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM) software and its application to real world facility management. LEC
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The main objective of this course is to introduce and inform the student of the processes involved in construction estimating. This course will focus on commercial construction and the fundamentals of estimating a commercial project. This course will acquaint the student with quantity surveying, costing methods, types of estimates, estimating software, the construction estimating process, and estimating the various parts of a project. LEC
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The main objective of this course is to introduce and inform the student of the processes involved in construction project management. This course will focus on commercial construction and the fundamentals of managing a commercial project. The course will acquaint the student with transferring a project from the estimating stage to actual construction, the buyout process, contracts, purchase orders, responsibilities of project managers, responsibilities of superintendents, planning and scheduling, management of changes in a project, financial reporting, accounting processes, payment procedures, and the close-out process in construction. LEC
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This course is intended to be a broad course introducing basis concepts of sustainable design. It will introduce broad outlines of many of the crucial issues facing us in the next few decades. This course identifies how we can re-imagine the relationship between human beings and living systems. The order of the course will begin at a broad overview of our environmental dilemma, then focus upon community issues and end with a close look at green buildings and their systems. This course will include a series of lectures, required reading with written responses, visits to local examples of sustainable buildings and the development of research projects. LEC
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This course explores how a neighborhood is sustainable, or is not. Imbedded in our built landscape are constructs, which once revealed, offer us insight into a community's values and underlying intentions. We will engage neighborhoods in Lawrence, Kansas, and other community neighborhoods. This seminar course will provide a format for discussion and testing observations of patterns in neighborhoods. Our intent will be to describe the detailed patterns for neighborhoods, houses, and gardens, thereby increasing an understanding of how people inform and are informed by their neighborhoods. This course will include a series of lectures, required reading with written responses, visits to a variety of neighborhoods and the development of research projects. LEC
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May be repeated up to a maximum of 9 credits. Students participate in a study abroad program approved by the Architecture Chair. Students will be evaluated upon a submitted journal, sketchbook, or equivalent assignments assigned by the instructor. IND
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Based upon the student's approved proposal, each student will explore the process of creating the built environment by working in a setting that is intended to provide a new perspective for that student. The range of venues may include non-profit organizations, research settings, hands -on building experiences, and other professional settings as approved by the instructor. Students evaluation will include an assessment by the supervisor in the practicum settings as well as on a final paper using appropriate graphics to illustrate key points. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. IND
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Students will document their experience in ARCH 690 or another approved study abroad program. This is intended as a critical reflection upon the student's experience and is additional documentation produced beyond the work done for the study abroad credit. The final product will include a written paper, using appropriate graphics to illustrate key points. IND
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This course is about the design of places where people work. The workplace is important for many reasons. Not only do we spend a considerable amount of our waking life there, but our work often becomes one of the central features of our life. In some senses it can be considered to be a homelike activity; people often identify with their work and personalize their workplaces and make them responsive to their daily life needs. Workplaces are also social places where people meet and interact. And, of course they are also places of work, where they must respond to work needs and be conducive to efficient and productive work activities. This course will raise questions about how to design good workplaces. LEC
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Architects design buildings and spaces which they hope will contribute to making significant, enriching, and rewarding places. The quality of places, however, is not identical to the quality of buildings which contribute to them. This course will explore ways in which physical environments, in this case, houses can become and be experienced as rich and embraced homeplaces. It will look at the various processes through which residents, dwellers, designers, real-estate agents, builders, and others are involved with home environments. Implications for design and production processes will be investigated with reference to particular case studies. LEC
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This course explores both theoretical and applied perspectives as to how design at the scales of settlement, neighborhood, building and room enables enhanced quality of life for society's elderly and their families. Discussion will center on readings, case studies and lecture material, with a focus on arriving at a critical understanding of how built fabric choreographs the aging experience. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Required of all Army Cadets. A study of Army customs and courtesies, drill and ceremony, career opportunities in the Army, and the life and work of a junior Army officer. Cadets develop leadership potential through practical supervised training. Course must be taken in conjunction with Army 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, and 402. Course not approved for credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. LAB
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Required introductory course for the Army military science program. Course is comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Introduces the military science program as an element of the reserve forces and includes an examination of major legislation, the Army organization structure, and military leadership techniques. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LAB
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Course comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of leadership laboratory per week. A general study and appreciation of the American military system from colonial times to the present. The course identifies factors present in the American society and national policy in each particular historical period which influenced the development of American military systems. The relationship between the military establishment and the larger American society is examined in each historical period. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 101 or department approval. LEC
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Course comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Analyzes the principles of war and military leadership at small unit level, and introduces principles of military writing. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 102 or department approval. LAB
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Course is comprised of one hour of lecture and one hour of leadership laboratory per week. Curriculum consists of the fundamentals of topographic map reading and their application in a field environment. Includes instruction in various types of maps, marginal information, topographic symbols and colors, scale, distance, direction and use of the magnetic compass. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 201 or department approval. LAB
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Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. A comprehensive study of conventional tactical operations. Emphasizes the fundamentals of land warfare and the qualities necessary to conduct fluid, non-linear operations. Introduces the student to the tenets of Air-Land Battle, the underlying structure of modern warfare, the dynamics of combat power, and the application of classical principles of war to a contemporary battlefield. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 202 or department approval. LEC
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Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. Expands on the application of conventional tactical operations in the low, medium, and high intensity conflict spectrum. Examines the three-dimensional nature of modern warfare and the unified battlefield. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 301 or department approval. LEC
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Introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of developing physical fitness programs for all Army personnel from the commander or supervisor's perspective. Provides an overview of total fitness, defines physical fitness, outlines the phases of fitness, discusses various types of fitness programs, and presents evaluation criteria. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, to count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC
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Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. An introduction to the military management system with special attention to the functions, organizations, and operations of military training, logistics and administration. The use of standardized staff formats in the development of plans and orders is emphasized from the standpoint of the leader with limited resources. Extensive use of standard staff procedures is emphasized in problem solving scenarios. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 302 or department approval. LEC
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Course is comprised of three hours of lecture and two hours of leadership laboratory per week. A seminar on the military profession as an object of social inquiry. Focus is on the internal structure of the profession, current problems, and interaction with the larger American society. Seminar topics include but are not limited to the following: a historical perspective on the military profession; civil-military relations; social and political impact of military activities; military justice; professionalism versus careerism. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. Prerequisite: ARMY 401 or department approval. LEC
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A study of present and future military operations; emphasis placed on analysis of problem. The student will defend his/her analysis through written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson. LEC
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Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in drawing and painting; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. Counts only as studio elective or general elective for a B.F.A. in Art or Design. LAB
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Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in printmaking, including woodcut, etching, lithography and silk screen; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. Counts only as a studio elective or general elective for a B.F.A. in Art or Design. LAB
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Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in three-dimensional form and space, including sculpture, modeling, carving, and construction; may include field trips, films, visiting lecturers. Six hours scheduled studio activity and three hours outside work weekly. Counts only as a studio elective or general elective for a B.F.A. in Art or Design. LAB
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Course to be offered in related areas of research, mixed media or interdisciplinary exploration. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. LAB
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Course to be offered in related areas of research, mixed media or interdisciplinary exploration. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. LAB
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Comprehensive development of skills and strategies needed to pursue a career as a professional studio artist. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Twenty-four hours of departmental electives or permission of instructor. LEC
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Directed reading in specific areas of art. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of departmental electives and permission of instructor. IND
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Lecture, discussion, and supervised research in current topics related to contemporary studio theory and criticism. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. This course will be counted as free electives in course distribution. Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of departmental electives. LEC
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Individual studio activity: Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: Twenty-four hours of departmental electives and permission of instructor. IND
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Individual studio activity under direction of faculty adviser. Prerequisite: Thirty hours of departmental electives, consent of department, and permission of instructor. IND
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Continuation of ART 695. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: ART 695 and permission of instructor. IND
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A survey course that describes the interplay between the science of astronomy and cultural beliefs. It uses, among others, examples of how religious and philosophical tenets have enhanced or conflicted with scientific principles. Not for astronomy majors. LEC
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The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Concurrent enrollment in ASTR 196 suggested, but not required. Prerequisite: One year each of high school algebra and geometry. LEC
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An introduction to astronomical observations and methods. Students have the opportunity to use the telescopes at the K.U. observatory. The course includes constellation recognition, finding celestial objects, and interpreting astronomical data. A companion course to ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Counts as a laboratory science when preceded or accompanied by ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. LAB
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An exploration of astronomical extremes from various points of view: extremes in ages (the Big Bang and recent star formation), velocities and distances (quasars), rotation (pulsars), density (white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes), energy release (stellar explosions), and proximity (interacting binary stars). Prerequisite: Survey course in astronomy. LEC
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Undergraduate observational or theoretical problems in astronomy. Maximum credit, six hours. Prerequisite: Permission of department. IND
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An honors, calculus-based introduction to astronomy and astrophysics, required for astronomy majors. Components of the Universe - from planetary systems, stellar systems, large scale structure and cosmology - are examined to illuminate the physics principles which govern their evolution. Not open to students with prior credit in ASTR 191 or ASTR 291. Prerequisite: MATH 121, and either permission of instructor, or participation in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to the search for planets around other stars and for life in the universe beyond the earth. A discussion of the astronomical conditions under which life might form and the biological conditions of life formation and evolution. Methods of searching for extraterrestrial life. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biology, astronomy or geology. LEC
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This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their adviser. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as EPHX 503 and PHSX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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Fundamentals of stellar astronomy including astronomical optics and techniques, coordinate and time systems, stellar spectroscopy, properties of normal, binary and variable stars. Prerequisite: PHSX 212. An introductory astronomy course is desirable. LEC
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A study of stellar groups, the interstellar medium, galactic structure and dynamics, galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisite: ASTR 591 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Students acquire practical experience with astronomical equipment and data reduction techniques used in research and educational contexts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 591. LEC
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