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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Advanced instruction is offered in the form of tutorials for a limited number of undergraduate students with prior experience in anatomical sciences. The emphasis of the course will be advanced study of a specific area of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, or histology. In gross anatomy and neuroanatomy, students will do a complete, detailed dissection of a specific area of the body and present it to the faculty with a term paper on a clinically significant aspect of the dissection. In histology, students will prepare specific organs for special histological and immunocytochemical techniques with an oral presentation and term paper. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Arabic. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. A continuation of ARAB 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: ARAB 110. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Arabic texts and discussion in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 120. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Continuation of ARAB 210. Discussion in Arabic of texts studied. Prerequisite: ARAB 210. LEC
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A practical Arabic language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Arabic. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Arabic study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ARAB 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ARAB 310 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of ARAB 401. LEC
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An introduction to the study and practice of architectural engineering. Topics covered include the building process; design document preparation; library and Internet research; engineering practice issues such as licensing, ethics, and team work; and oral, written, and graphic presentation skills. This course is built around design projects assigned throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Architectural Engineering program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to computers as design tools in architectural engineering. The course covers computer aided design, surface modeling, solid modeling, rendering techniques, Internet tools, and basic customization of CAD software. Prerequisite: ARCH 113, EECS 138, and MATH 122. LEC
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An introduction to the structural, thermal, electrical, and optical properties of building materials. Manufacturing, testing, integration, and specification of materials with emphasis on commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings. Prerequisite: PHSX 212 and CHEM 184 or CHEM 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Special problems in architectural engineering. The study of a particular problem involving individual research and report. Prerequisite: Students must submit, in writing, a proposal including a statement of the problem the student wishes to pursue, the methodology the student plans to use in the program, and objectives of the special problems. The student must also have a signed agreement with the faculty member proposed as instructor for the course. Consent of the instructor. IND
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A study of the indoor thermal environment, water supply, sanitary sewage disposal, storm drainage, and codes for building mechanical systems. This course is not open to students in the School of Engineering. Prerequisite: ARCH 626 and PHSX 114. LEC
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This course introduces the design of commercial and industrial power systems. Emphasis is placed on the proper selection, specification, and installation of materials and equipment that comprise commercial and industrial power systems. This course covers the application of materials and equipment in accordance with industry standards, independent laboratory testing, and the National Electrical Code. Prerequisite: EECS 315 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ARCE 640 that integrates system components into functional, safe, and reliable power distribution systems for commercial, industrial and institutional (CII) facilities. Service entrance design, distribution system layout and reliability, emergency and standby power system design, medium-voltage distribution systems, symmetrical fault analysis, and special equipment and occupancies. Prerequisite: ARCE 640 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Students are introduced to lighting fundamentals, measurement, and technology and to their application in the analysis and design of architectural lighting systems. Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced analysis, design, and modeling of luminous environments. Impact of lighting on human perception and interaction with space, advanced computational techniques, effective and efficient integration of natural and artificial lighting, modeling and analysis of light sources and spaces, simulation of lighting systems, and design of lighting control systems. Prerequisite: ARCE 217 and ARCE 650 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The fundamentals of moist air processes, air and moisture exchange, and building heat transfer. Determination of heating and cooling loads under steady-state and transient conditions. Prerequisite: ARCE 217, ME 312, and either ME 510 or CE 330, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Analysis and design of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration equipment and systems. Prerequisite: ARCE 660 or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Energy usage in commercial buildings and industry, energy auditing methodology, utility analysis, management measures, and economic evaluation are covered. Includes fieldwork. Prerequisite: (CMGT 357, ARCE 642, ARCE 645, and ARCE 660) or consent of instructor for Engineering students or (ARCH 526, ARCH 527, and ARCE 561) or consent of instructor for Architectural students. LEC
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An introduction to human response, fire science, combustion calculations, compartment fires, piping and sprinkler design, and smoke management. Analytical methods, experimental data, codes, case-studies, and videos are presented in this engineering design course. Prerequisite: ME 312 or C&PE 221 and ME 510, CE 330, or C&PE 511, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A quantitative and qualitative study of active, passive, wind, and photovoltaic energy conversion systems for buildings. Solar radiation and system performance prediction. Prerequisite: ME 312, C&PE 221, or ARCE 561, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the physics and measurement of sound, wave phenomena, acoustics, and methods of noise and excessive vibration control for various applications. Prerequisite: PHSX 115, PHSX 212, EECS 220, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Capstone engineering design course that includes the analysis, design, and integration of structural, mechanical, electrical, and lighting systems for a commercial, industrial, or institutional building. Prerequisite: CMGT 400, ARCE 642, ARCE 645, ARCE 661, CE 562, and CE 563, or consent of instructor. Fifth year senior standing in architectural engineering. LAB
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Comprehensive architectural engineering design project in a specific area of professional practice. Prerequisite: ARCE 680 or consent of instructor. Fifth year senior standing in architectural engineering. LAB
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The study of a particular problem in architectural engineering involving individual research and presentation. Prerequisite: Student must submit, in writing, a proposal including a statement of the problem the student wishes to pursue, the methodology the student plans to use in the program, and objectives of the special problems. The student must also have a signed agreement with the faculty member proposed as instructor for the course. Consent of instructor. IND
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Research a particular architectural engineering problem. Research will involve defining the problem, developing a research methodology, applying the research methodology and gathering data, analyzing and interpreting the data, and presenting the results of the research. The student must have a faculty sponsor and submit a proposal in writing stating the objective of the research, the planned research method that will be used, and the method of reporting the results. Prerequisite: Participation in the University Honors Program, consent of instructor, and approval of the chair are required. LEC
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An introductory design studio directed toward the development of spatial thinking and the skills necessary for the analysis and design of architectural space and form. This course is based on a series of exercises that include direct observation: drawing, analysis and representation of the surrounding world, and full-scale studies in the making of objects and the representation of object and space. Students are introduced to different descriptive and analytical media and techniques of representation to aid in the development of critical thought. These include freehand drawing, orthographic projection, paraline drawing, basic computer skills, and basic materials investigation. Prerequisite: Approval from the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. LAB
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A continuation of ARCH 100 with major emphasis on the design relationships among people, architectural space, and the environment. The course is based on a series of exercises leading to the understanding of architectural enclosure as mediating between people and the outside world. Issues of scale, light, proportion, rhythm, sequence, threshold, and enclosure are introduced in relation to the human body, as well as in relation to architectural form, environment, and social and psychological factors. Students will engage in drawing, perspective projection, model building, and basic computer graphics. Prerequisite: ARCH 100. LAB
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An introduction to the study and practice of architecture. This course aims at orienting the student to the various disciplinary facets which make up the total architectural curriculum as well as to the various professional roles which architects can be expected to perform. Architectural study is seen as both an art and a science, and architectural practice is seen as a complex, interdisciplinary professional activity. Presentations by guest lecturers are included. Discussions required for, and only open to, B.A. in Architectural Studies students. LEC
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A lecture course covering the emergence of technological, theoretical and aesthetic principles of modern design beginning with the socio-cultural impact of industrialization and the crisis in architecture at the end of the 19th century. Attention is given to functionalist theory, mechanical analogies and the so-called machine aesthetic of 1910-1930 and to the precedents of important design principles of modern architecture, including modular coordination, the open plan, interlocking universal space, unadorned geometry, structural integrity, programmatic and tectonic expression, efficiency and transparency and briefly explores their development in post-war and late 20th century examples. Prerequisite: Student must be in School of Architecture, Design and Planning. LEC
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The seminar provides a discussion section that supplements the lectures presented in ARCH 103. The course must be taken concurrently with ARCH 103 and is open only to students in the B.A. in Architectural Studies Program, or with approval by the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. SEM
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This seminar provides a discussion section that supplements the lectures presented in the lectures of ARCH 104. The course must be taken concurrently with ARCH 104 and is open only to students in the B.A. in Architectural Studies program, or with consent of the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. LEC
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An introductory design studio directed toward the development of spatial thinking and the skills necessary for the analysis and design of architectural space and form. This course is based on a series of exercises that include direct observation: drawing, analysis and representation of the surrounding world, and full-scale studies in the making of objects and the representation of object and space. Students are introduced to different descriptive and analytical media and techniques of representation to aid in the development of critical thought. These include freehand drawing, orthographic projection, paraline drawing, basic computer skills, and basic materials investigation. Prerequisite: Approval from the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. LAB
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A continuation of ARCH 108 with major emphasis on the design relationships among people, architectural space, and the environment. The course is based on a series of exercises leading to the understanding of architectural enclosure as mediating between people and the outside world. Issues of scale, light, proportion, rhythm, sequence, threshold, and enclosure are introduced in relation to the human body, as well as in relation to architectural form, environment, and social and psychological factors. Students will engage in drawing, perspective projection, model building, and basic computer graphics. Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or ARCH 108. LAB
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This course will introduce students to the history and nature of the architecture profession and its relationship to education, internship, registration and certification. The various roles which architects are expected to perform and the ethical standards they are expected to uphold are explored in the context of different models of practice. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to M.Arch 5-year program, Arch Studies Program or approval by the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 101 with a series of studio exercises following a succession based on analysis, form, and syntax, with an emphasis on the communication of architectural ideas. Students explore plan, section, and spatial organization, spatial sequence, structure and materiality in relation to human dwelling and the building site. The course aims for student integration of these issues into building designs that require the organization of multiple spaces. Students will consider natural forces as they both shape and affect buildings, including gravity, wind, light, heat, sound, and fluids. Precedent studies, direct observation, building analysis, and site analysis are significant aspects of the semester. Prerequisite: ARCH 101. LAB
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The course advances empirical understanding of natural forces as they both shape and affect buildings, including gravity, wind, light, heat, sound, and fluids. This course emphasizes the development of conceptual thinking and problem solving skills through sensory-based demonstrations, lectures, and laboratory experimentation. The course will emphasize concepts of PHSX 114 as they relate to the built environment. The course will require freehand drawing, physical, model-building and the application of Photoshop and InDesign software programs. Tutorials and workshop sessions will introduce and require use of other computer software applications. Prerequisite: PHSX 114 and either ARCH 109 or ARCH 502; or consent of instructor. LEC
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The second year studios are responsible for introducing students to the basic form determinants of architecture-from limited scope exercises to complete building designs within the natural environment. Using diagrams and sketches, plans, sections, elevations and models, students explore the spatial ordering of human activity, the analysis of site, sound, light and air modulation, simple environmental controls and energy conservation, basic framing systems, volumetric organization and the materials of building skins and envelopes in the design of small buildings. Prerequisite: ARCH 109. LAB
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A continuation of ARCH 208 with an emphasis on the synthesis of basic form determinants, including the completion of a design project of a medium-sized, multi-storied public building in the urban environment containing a variety of spaces and spans. This project will enable students to demonstrate competence in basic architectural design, act as a summation of the variety of smaller design exercises undertaken through the year, and prepare students for the third year focus on the materials and methods of building construction. Prerequisite: ARCH 208. LAB
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The course will immerse students in the exploration of the generation, manipulation, and production of graphic images through the use of computers. The goal of the course is to help reach an understanding of computers that allows for future growth in an environment in constant change, and to provide an overview of what is currently possible. The format of the course will be a combination of lectures and workshops. The lectures will introduce students to theoretical and application-oriented topics. Group discussions will focus on the computer as a conceptual construct, the computability of design, and computers as design partners. The workshops will provide students with hands-on experience. The vehicles used for these investigations will be desktop publishing, paint, and drafting tools. As resources become available this list will be augmented. LEC
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A survey of architectural history from pre-history through the Middle Ages, primarily in Europe, Africa and the Near East, with additional lectures on the Far East and the Americas. Emphasis given to the formal and technological aspects of the buildings on the social and political functions of architecture. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 340, History of Architecture I, studying the period from 1400-1800. Particular attention given to new theoretical developments and to stylistic expressions that emerged with the revived interest in classical antiquity, the effects of new scientific thinking on architecture, and on the role of architecture as an expression of political power. Emphasis is on architecture in Europe and the Americas with exploration of contemporary developments in Asia and Africa. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. Prerequisite: ARCH 340 or ARCH 640 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 341, History of Architecture II, covers the period from around 1800 to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the major cultural shifts that have impacted architectural representation and have contributed to its differentiation as Modern, not only in Europe, North and South America but also with examples in India and Pakistan. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. Prerequisite: ARCH 341 or ARCH 641 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Special problems in architecture. The study of a particular problem in architecture involving individual research and presentation. Conferences and reports. (May be taken for Credit/No Credit.) Prerequisite: Student must submit to his or her faculty adviser, in advance, a statement of the problem he or she wishes to pursue, the methodology he or she plans to use in the program, and the objectives of the special problems. He or she must also be in agreement with the faculty member he or she proposes as instructor for the course. IND
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This course situates landscape architecture in a broad cultural and social context with the intention of developing skills in critical thinking about the role of exterior place-making in the built environment. Lectures and assigned readings will explore central issues in the history and theory of landscape architecture and look at key sites and their designers. Other topics will include environmental attitudes and perception, the human experience of place, and ideas of nature. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process of architectural design and further develop a formal vocabulary. Students will explore building analysis through studio-type exercises. Both local and well known buildings will be examined. Open only to students admitted to B.A. in Architectural Studies. Prerequisite: ARCH 103. One history course (HA or ARCH) as well. LEC
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This course will extend the concerns of ARCH 380. Students will analyze more complex architectural programs, city spaces, and larger buildings. They will make design proposals for small scale structures. Prerequisite: ARCH 380. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 209 with an increased emphasis on building construction and systems as form determinants. Work will focus on medium scale, multi-storey non-residential buildings developed to an appropriate level of technical resolution as evidenced in clear schematic wall sections and structural proposals. Prerequisite: ARCH 209. LAB
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A workshop based course with an emphasis on materiality and construction of building assemblies through hands-on activities. Development of craft, process, collaboration and technical documentation skills will be a primary objective of the course. Prerequisite: ARCH 209. LAB
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This seminar will expose students to normative and critical approaches in the profession of architecture. Through field trips, attendance at juries, readings, and presentations by architects and designers, they are to develop an understanding of the precedence, theories, and practices of the profession. This is the capstone course for the B.A. in Architectural Studies. Prerequisite: ARCH 381. LEC
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The first of three accelerated design studios, this course emphasizes the design relationships among people, architectural space, and the environment. Issues of shelter, light, sequence and threshold are considered in relation to physical, psychological and sociological factors. Offered only in the summer. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree and permission of the Dean of Architecture and Urban Planning. LAB
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The second of three accelerated design studios, this course emphasizes construction and technology as expressive mediators in the relationship between human dwelling and site. Students will consider natural forces as they both shape and affect buildings, including gravity, wind, light, heat, sound and fluids. Prerequisite: ARCH 502 and/or permission of the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Corequisite: ARCH 626. LAB
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The third of three accelerated design studios, this course focuses on the integration of material learned in previous studios with urban-based design problems of increasing scale and complexity within the frameworks of sustainability and universal design. Students will demonstrate an ability to use research and critical thinking skills, including the use of case precedents, and the ability to integrate various building systems in building design. Prerequisite: ARCH 503 (see studio grading policy) or permission of the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Corequisite: ARCH 627. LAB
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Graduate studio emphasizing urban context and design theories. Students will undertake specialized research projects. Prerequisite: ARCH 504 (see studio grading policy) or permission of the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Corequisite: ARCH 690. LAB
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The study of a particular problem in architecture involving the application of computer-aided design and analysis techniques. Individual or group tutorials. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor based on the student's advance submission of a written proposal outlining the plan of study. Completion of one course in computer programming and/or specific experience in writing original computer programs. LEC
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This course will expose students to building information modeling: a digital representation of the building process that facilitates exchange and interoperability of information in digital format. The focus will be on the software's potential for reducing the information loss that occurs during each handoff of the project during the traditional delivery method. Possibilities for integrated practice including lifecycle costing and knowledge management are discussed. LEC
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The aim of the course is to teach practical presentation skills using computer software, in addition to graphic design theories and strategies. This course will provide an opportunity for students to design and produce a design portfolio appropriate for internship and/or graduate school applications. LEC
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An introduction to the physics of sound. Objective and subjective evaluation and control of sound as applied to architectural spaces. Room shaping, mechanical and electrical system noise and vibration control, and electro-acoustic sound reinforcement. Prerequisite: PHSX 114 and ARCH 626 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of electro-acoustic sound reinforcement and reproduction systems for buildings. Prerequisite: PHSX 212, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The fundamental principles of structural behavior including stress and deformation in structural components and systems. Open to architecture students only. Prerequisite: PHSX 114. LEC
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This introductory course addresses human needs and comfort in relation to the natural and man-made environments. Specific topics include: climate and weather; environmental health; indoor air quality; thermal comfort; passive and active systems and design strategies for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning; plumbing; noise control; building management systems; and life safety systems. Prerequisite: PHSX 114. LEC
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This course addresses human needs and comfort in relation to the natural and man-made environments. Specific topics include: daylighting, electrical lighting systems, building acoustics, electrical power distribution systems, alternative energy sources, communication systems, and transportation systems. Prerequisite: ARCH 530. LEC
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A survey of architectural history from pre-history through the Middle Ages, primarily in Europe, Africa and the Near East, with additional lectures on the Far East and the Americas. Emphasis given to the formal and technological aspects of the buildings on the social and political functions of architecture. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. Supplementary readings and/or assignments may be assigned. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 540, History of Architecture I, studying the period from 1400-1800. Particular attention given to new theoretical developments and to stylistic expressions that emerged with the revived interest in classical antiquity, the effects of new scientific thinking on architecture, and on the role of architecture as an expression of political power. Emphasis is on architecture in Europe and the Americas with exploration of contemporary developments in Asia and Africa. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. Supplementary readings and/or assignments may be assigned. Prerequisite: ARCH 540 or ARCH 640 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ARCH 541, History of Architecture II, covers the period from around 1800 to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the major cultural shifts that have impacted architectural representation and have contributed to its differentiation as Modern, not only in Europe, North and South America but also with examples in India and Pakistan. Weekly lectures and readings including original sources. Supplementary readings and/or assignments may be assigned. Prerequisite: ARCH 541 or ARCH 641 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course takes the perspective that architectural design is inherently an ethical act. Through this lens, students will learn the essentials of office practices, the many definitions of client and their roles in the design process, the legal responsibilities of the profession, the importance of continuous professional development and the obligation the profession has to provide civic leadership in regard to the built and natural environment. LEC
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This course addresses context and design variable along with performance criteria of site and environment. Natural, social and built systems are presented using a range of perspectives, including holistic ones. Specific site analytic and design techniques are explained using tools that include GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and other appropriate computer models. Application exercises and ongoing analysis assignments are required. Enrollment is limited to those students pursuing the Masters of Architecture degree. Corequisite or Prerequisite: ARCH 105 or ARCH 504. LEC
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A series of seminars on contemporary issues facing the profession. LEC
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These seminars will consist of three to four guest lecturers each semester. All students enrolled in this course will attend the same lecture as ARCH 572. Topics will be selected to reflect major issues covered in the course work, or contemporary issues facing the profession. LEC
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These seminars will consist of three to four guest lecturers each semester. All students enrolled in this course will attend the same lecture with ARCH 571. Topics will be selected to reflect major issues covered in the course work, or contemporary issues facing the profession. LEC
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This course will focus on the fundamentals of accounting, macroeconomics and the construction industry, and concepts related to the development and implementation of a strategic business plan. LEC
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Topics that will be covered in this course include the organization of a professional practice, personnel management, and the development of effective communication skills. LEC
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This course covers the various procedures involved in managing a CAD system within a design organization. It also explores the different applications and uses of current CAD technology. Topics to be addressed include: selecting a system; billing CAD services; support services and personnel; marketing CAD; customization, file management, menus and script files; AutoLisp Programming; and integrating CAD with other programs. Prerequisite: An introductory CAD class or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Conventional methods for project delivery will be reviewed along with design/build, fast-track, and other techniques. The relationship of the architect and development will also be explored, as will the relationship of project development to urban design concepts. LEC
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The emphasis of this course will be on the development and implementation of a marketing plan, techniques related to the marketing of specific projects, and the relationship of marketing to other components of a firm. LEC
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A course designed to familiarize the student with legal considerations related to a professional practice. Case studies and selected readings will serve as the basis for discussion of registration, contracts, business formation, taxes, employment practices, copyright, and patent law. In addition, the course will draw upon the knowledge and experience of members of the professional community. LEC
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This course is for the study of architectural topics on a one time or experimental basis in response to changing needs and/or resources in the Program. It may be offered concurrently by different instructors under different subtitles as announced in the Timetable. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Variable. IND
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This course will examine issues in architectural research. It will provide an overview of graduate level studies with regard to definitions, methods, skills, and techniques. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, readings and guest presentations. The class will enable students to make informed judgments about matters of quality and quantity on architectural issues. Students will be expected to formulate sensible systems of classification for their chose material. Students will be expected to formulate sensible systems of classification for their chosen material. Students will be expected to produce papers and essays, make sample research proposals, and other research based assignments. Limited to students in M. Arch Program with Undergraduate status. Prerequisite: ARCH 608. LEC
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A continuation of previous studio course work with an emphasis on the programming and design of individual urban buildings with culture, context and precedent as major form determinants. Clear development and integration of structural, mechanical and life safety systems will be a focus of the course. The concepts of integrated practice and building information modeling will be introduced. Prerequisite: ARCH 408 and ARCH 409; or ARCH 301 or ARCH 504 or ARCH 505; or ARCH 604. LAB
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A culmination of all previous design study with emphasis given to the individual student's demonstration of synthesis of all previously learned design skills. These include program analysis, site design, structure, formal composition, materials and methods of construction, technical development of building fabric, environmental systems, code and zoning compliance, and principles of sustainability. Students should also demonstrate an appropriate awareness of history, theory, and culture. The level of project development should be demonstrated by technically precise drawings and will researched written documentation in addition to other means of representation. Prerequisite: ARCH 608 and successful completion of all other required professional courses through the semester with ARCH 608. LAB
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This course introduces one to the use of computers in project development (final and execution drawings, specifications). Initiates advanced computer aided design systems. Emphasis is to be on CAD potential in generating complex representation; lectures and laboratory work on extent and limits of CAD systems in design; familiarizes with software and hardware (basic training, plotting, etc.); encourages the use of CAD process for exploration (three-dimensional representation); introduces editing and report preparation. Lectures on computers and profession. No computer language is taught in this course. Prerequisite: ARCH 310 or introductory CAD course. LEC
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An intensive course covering the graphics topics described in ARCH 113 and ARCH 114. Graduate level course that supplements the core syllabus or ARCH 102 with weekly seminars, expanded reading lists, and additional classroom assignments. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in area other than architecture with three credits in calculus, four credits in physics, three semesters of English, and/or permission of the Dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning. LAB
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Open to all students at all levels interested in enhancing freehand drawing skills, generally with the architectural realm. While a broad range of expression and graphic materials is explored, emphasis is on drawing as a notational skill, the instrument of creative expression for professional purposes as well as for lifelong artistic fulfillment. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB
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Open to students with intermediate level graphic skills. Course will be designed to deal with all aspects of graphic communication for designers in the different stages of the architectural process. This would include sketching, drafting, lettering, rendering, modelmaking, photographic and slide presentation, reproduction, brochure, etc. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB
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An advanced studio course intended for students who have a working knowledge of basic presentation techniques wishing to refine their existing skills and experiment with new techniques. The course will review basic techniques and explore new ones through a series of lectures and these techniques will be put to use in the concurrent development of complete presentations of architecturally significant buildings. The lectures and studio work will be supplemented by slide presentations, demonstrations, guest lecturers, and field trips. Not intended as a remedial course or substitute for ARCH 615. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A basic course in black and white photography intended to enable the student to utilize photography routinely as a medium for visualization, documentation and presentation of images useful for design. It is organized in relation to the controls of the roll film camera so that assignments reinforce the understanding of this tool and its creative possibilities. Experiences include making photograms, developing black and white film, printing black and white images, mounting and presenting prints, photocopying, photographing buildings and architectural models, photomontage, high contrast graphics effects and an introduction to color materials. Enough technical information is included for the student to pursue black and white photography on his/her own to the desired level of proficiency. LAB
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