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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An introductory study of the various modes of transportation, emphasizing highways, railroads, and air transport. The planning, design and operations of these modes are discussed. There is a multimodal project included in this course. Prerequisite: CE 240. LEC
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Principles involved in the testing, behavior, and selection of materials for use in the transportation field. Emphasis is on bituminous materials, aggregate, and soil stabilization. Prerequisite: CE 310. LEC
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Three lecture periods and one laboratory period. Fundamental theories of soil mechanics and their applications in engineering. Prerequisite: CE 310 and CE 330. LEC
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An advanced study related to a special problem in the field of civil engineering or allied fields, for upper-division undergraduate students. IND
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A course or colloquium to present topics of special interest. Prerequisite: Varies by topic. LEC
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Prerequisite: Participation in or eligibility for the University Honors Program. Sophomore or higher standing. LEC
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Concepts of professional development. LEC
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Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Study of water resources structures and systems with design emphasis on the hydraulic features: dams, drainage, river engineering, pipelines, channels and hydraulic machinery. Prerequisite: CE 330 and CE 455. LEC
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Two one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Fundamentals of structural design with steel. Prerequisite: C E 461. LEC
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Two one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Fundamentals of structural design with reinforced concrete. Prerequisite: CE 461; CE 412 or CE 484 (or concurrent). LEC
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The fundamentals of aquatic chemistry, with emphasis on application to water purification and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing, CE 477, and MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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A laboratory introducing the basic chemical tests used in the water and wastewater fields of environmental engineering and science. Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing, and credit or co-enrollment in CE 570. LAB
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A basic study of the microorganisms of importance in environmental engineering. Emphasis is placed on the microbiology of dilute nutrient solutions. Microbial physiology, microbial ecology, and biochemistry will be discussed as they pertain to environmental engineering and science. Both biodegradation and public health aspects are included. (Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.) Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing, CE 477 or equivalent, and MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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This course emphasizes understanding of air pollution problems and their solution through engineering design and science. Topics covered include: types of air pollutants; monitoring of air pollutants; transport of air pollutants in the atmosphere; and control of air pollution emissions from both stationary and mobile sources. Prerequisite: CE 330, CE 477, MATH 122, PHSX 212; or consent of instructor. LEC
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The principles of public water supply design, including source selection, collection, purification, and distribution; for municipal wastewater, collection, treatment, and disposal. Prerequisite: CE 330, CE 455, and CE 477. LEC
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A review of the methods of industrial water treatment and the fundamentals of industrial water pollution control. Topics include: water budgets, cooling tower and boiler treatment, corrosion control, government regulations, wastewater characterization, waste minimization, pilot plants, pretreatment, final treatment, and site selection. Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing, and CE 477 or equivalent. LEC
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The course covers the major technical aspects of traditional planning methodologies, computer applications in transportation and the impact of technology on the management and planning processes. Topics discussed will include origin-destination surveys, demand analysis models, supply analysis, traffic impact studies, computer simulation and modeling, economics, management systems, intelligent transportation systems (ITS), and geographic information systems (GIS). Prerequisite: CE 390 and senior standing. LEC
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A comprehensive study of the planning, design, construction, operations, and maintenance of highway systems with emphasis on the design aspects of a highway. Prerequisite: CE 240, CE 455, and CE 487. LEC
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A study of the interaction of the characteristics of soil or rocks and structures. The estimation of settlement and bearing capacity of foundation elements. Principles governing the choice and design of footings, rafts, piers, and piles. Prerequisite: CE 487. LEC
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Course topics include data description, measures of central tendency and dispersion, sampling and sampling designs, quality control, persistence, periodicity, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, ANOVA, correlation, linear regression, multiple correlation, and multiple regression. Applications and real world problems are stressed. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 115 and MATH 116. LEC
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Principles involved in the testing, behavior, and selection of materials for use in the transportation field. Emphasis is on bituminous materials, aggregate, and soil stabilization. Readings. Prerequisite: CE 310 and CE 487. LEC
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An introductory interdisciplinary topics course addressing contemporary issues related to one or more East Asian countries. Format and content will vary. Does not count toward the EALC major or minor requirements unless otherwise indicated by EALC in the Schedule of Classes. LEC
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An interdisciplinary seminar addressing contemporary issues related to one or more East Asian countries. Prerequisites to be determined by instructor(s) on the basis of course content. Does not count toward the EALC major or minor requirements unless otherwise indicated by EALC in the Schedule of Classes. LEC
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Specifically for students with limited or no previous experience. An introduction to ceramics including throwing, handbuilding, glazing, firing, and related activities. Counts only as a studio elective or general elective for a B.F.A. in Art or Design. LAB
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A continuation of ABDC 208 with emphasis in firing low temperature ceramics. An introduction to glaze formulation and firing procedures through the use of earthenware and low temperature talc bodies. Prerequisite: ABDC 208. LAB
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A study of high fire ceramics using stoneware and porcelain. The development of ceramic forms and shapes utilizing traditional and nontraditional techniques such as salt glaze, wood firing, oxidation, and reductions. Prerequisite: ABDC 208. LAB
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Development of individual direction in ceramics based on experience, research, and skills acquired in previous courses. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: CER 301 and CER 302. LAB
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The principles in kiln design, including up-draft, down-draft, cross-draft, and electric kilns, and burner technology. Prerequisite: CER 301. LEC
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Formulation of the various clay bodies and glazes associated with ceramics. Prerequisite: CER 301. LEC
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Procedures, techniques, problems, and solutions for setting up and operating a production pottery studio, including the development of ceramic forms and glazes related to marketability and design and mold production for industry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CER 301 and CER 302. LAB
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For freshmen and sophomores. Rehearsal and performance of string chamber music repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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For freshmen and sophomores. The study of works for various combinations of instruments. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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For freshmen and sophomores. Study and performance of seventeenth and eighteenth century chamber music using replicas of period instruments. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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The performance of music in the most recent styles as well as masterworks of the 20th century. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. ACT
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For juniors and seniors. Study and performance of seventeenth and eighteenth century chamber music using replicas of period instruments. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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For juniors and seniors. The study of standard chamber music literature with or without piano. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Rehearsal and performance of string chamber music repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The performance of music in the most recent styles as well as masterworks of the 20th century. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. ACT
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This course is a non-laboratory version of CHEM 125 and is a general treatment of basic concepts of general and organic chemistry as well as the role and significance of chemistry in the modern world. It is designed to fulfill the science requirement for non-science students, and should not be taken by students whose major requires a laboratory course in chemistry or more than one semester of chemistry. Meets with CHEM 125 for three lecture periods per week, with optional discussion sessions. LEC
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A general treatment of the basic concepts of general and organic chemistry as well as the role and significance of chemistry in the modern world. The course is designed to fulfill the science requirement for non-science majors, and should not be taken by students who require more than one semester of chemistry. Students in the School of Engineering may not take this course for credit. Three class periods, one three-hour laboratory, and optional discussion sessions. CHEM 125 and CHEM 150 cannot both be taken for credit. LEC
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This one semester course is designed for students in the School of Engineering who are not required to take additional chemistry courses at the college level. Topics covered in this integrated lecture and laboratory course include quantum theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, solids, liquids, gases, thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, kinetics, polymer chemistry, and materials science. The application of these concepts to engineering problems and practices is emphasized. Prerequisite: Must have completed a course in high school chemistry and be eligible for MATH 121 (or have Departmental consent). Students not admitted to the School of Engineering must receive permission from instructor. CHEM 125 and CHEM 150 cannot both be taken for credit. LEC
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This course seeks to develop a working knowledge of the conceptual foundation and the quantitative chemical relationships on which subsequent chemistry courses are built. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, properties of gases, liquids, and solids, acid-base chemistry, and chemical equilibria are emphasized. The class meets each week for three one-hour lectures, a one-hour tutorial period, and a three-hour laboratory. Students with credit in CHEM 125 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Must be eligible for MATH 115. LEC
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A course designed for qualified and motivated students with a strong interest in chemistry to provide a more thorough treatment of the concepts and topics of general chemistry. It is anticipated that students in CHEM 185 have had chemistry at the high-school level and plan to take more than one year of chemistry at the college level. Class meets each week for three one-hour lectures, a one-hour tutorial period, and a three-hour lab. Students with credit in CHEM 125 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for CHEM 184, a satisfactory score on a qualifying examination administered by the Department of Chemistry, and at least one of the following: (a) acceptance into the KU Honors Program, (b) an AP score in chemistry of 3 or higher, (c) a mathematics ACT score of 28 or higher. LEC
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This course is a continuation of CHEM 184 and provides an introduction to inorganic chemistry and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Electrochemistry, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and coordination chemistry are stressed. The class meets each week for three one-hour lectures, an optional tutorial period, and a five-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 184. LEC
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A course designed for qualified and motivated students with strong interest in chemistry to provide a more thorough treatment of the concepts and topics of advanced general chemistry. It is anticipated that the students in CHEM 189 have completed CHEM 185 or excelled in CHEM 184. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, CHEM 184, CHEM 185, or consent of the department. LEC
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Special topics for chemistry majors such as using the chemical literature, educational and professional perspectives, scientific ethics, and undergraduate research opportunities. It is recommended that students take this half-semester course in their freshman or sophomore year. Prerequisite: A declared major in chemistry or consent of instructor. LEC
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Birth of modern chemical science from roots in Greek natural philosophy, alchemy, Renaissance medicine and technology. The Chemical Revolution of Lavoisier and Dalton. Maturity of chemistry in the 19th and 20th centuries, along with an examination of growth of chemical institutions and the rise of chemical industry. Emphasis on developments from the 18th century to the present. (Same as HIST 309.) LEC
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Individual and supervised study or laboratory work on special topics or problems in chemistry. Prerequisite: Ten hours of chemistry and a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.0 or consent of department. IND
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Principles of analytical chemistry with emphasis on the fundamental reactions used for chemical analysis. Topics include chemical equilibria in acid/base, complexation, separations, and redox systems, data analysis, and potentiometry. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 188, CHEM 622 or CHEM 624, CHEM 625, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 517. LEC
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Experiments illustrate fundamental principles of chemical analysis methods. The course serves as an introduction to advanced instrumental methods of analysis. One five-hour laboratory and one fifty minute lecture each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 188, CHEM 622 or CHEM 624, CHEM 625, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 516. LAB
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An introduction for pre-service teachers to the tools used by scientists to solve scientific problems. Topics include design of experiments and interpretation of their results, use of statistics, mathematical modeling, laboratory safety, ethical treatment of human subjects, writing scientific papers, giving oral presentations, and obtaining data from the scientific literature. Open only to students in the UKanTeach program. LEC
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A study of the structures and reactions of important classes of organic compounds. Along with the organic laboratory, CHEM 625, this course will fulfill the needs of students requiring a single semester of organic chemistry. Students requiring more than one semester of organic chemistry should enroll in CHEM 624. Prerequisite: CHEM 188. LEC
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Three class periods each week. A study of the structure and reactivity of selected classes of organic compounds. CHEM 624 is the first course of a two-semester sequence. Students who require only one semester of organic chemistry should enroll in CHEM 622. Students with credit in CHEM 622 will have two hours added on to their total number of hours required for graduation. Prerequisite: CHEM 188. LEC
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One five-hour laboratory and one one-hour lecture each week. Emphasis on basic techniques for the preparation, separation, and purification of organic compounds. Required for a major in chemistry and by those departments and programs specifying a complete undergraduate organic chemistry course. Prerequisite: CHEM 622 or CHEM 624, or concurrently. LAB
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