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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of law that are applicable to business transactions in the modern business world and the legal systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 hours completed). LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business law not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: BLAW 301; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A course designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of agency relationships, such as partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations, with special emphasis on the problems encountered by managers and directors in operating a corporation. The course should acquaint a student with how to create and operate a corporation in light of current federal and state enactments. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will address legal matters of concern to property owners, real estate agents and brokers, developers, renters, property managers, contractors, architects, planners, and lenders regarding real estate transactions. Concentrating on the general subjects of (1) the nature of real property, (2) transfer and financing of real estate, (3) land use and regulations, and (4) landlord and tenant relations, the course will address specific topics such as estates and interests in land, forms of ownership, agency and brokerage, and tax attributes of real estate investments, and will consider pertinent statutes and legal documents frequently used in real estate transactions. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An advanced course in legal aspects of business with emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course involves the study of the theory and practice of dispute resolution and negotiation in business mediation (facilitated negotiation). Conflict resolution in the workplace, including grievance procedures, will be considered. Students are required to apply concepts studied through role playing simulations. (Same as MGMT 525.) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 and BE 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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For freshmen and sophomores. Study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. May be repeated for credit. IND
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. May be repeated for credit. IND
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This course acquaints students with the nature of business majors and careers. With this knowledge, students can explore, engage and implement their academic and career interests within business. Students are introduced to the curricula requirements, expectations of business students, possible career paths, and the necessary professional skills in the business environment. Prerequisite: Open only to students with fewer than 60 hours. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of organizing a personal employment search strategy. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment of individual goals and talents, job markets, evaluation, and employment search strategies. It is highly recommended that students take this course during their junior year. Course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Course counts as an activity course. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 hours completed). LEC
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This course is intended to prepare you for the rapidly changing environment of business information retrieval, using both print and electronic information sources. Course sessions will cover both (1) the conceptual analysis, selection, and use of business information sources and (2) research strategies and techniques in locating information on your topic. The course will focus on your ability to develop critical thinking skills in researching your topic throughout the semester. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business administration not otherwise available to non-business majors. Topics selected will be determined by special interest and objectives of the student in consultation with the faculty member who will supervise the directed study or research. Prerequisite: 3.0 grade-point average, major in a field other than business administration and/or accounting, and permission of instructor offering the directed study and of the director of the undergraduate program. IND
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Internships provide opportunities for students to integrate their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Internships allow students to further their professional growth, explore career pathways, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre-and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the coordinator of the internships prior to the internship experience. BUS 399 is limited to one (1) credit hour per offering, but students may count a maximum of two (2) cumulative credit hours of BUS 399 toward degree requirements. Internships must satisfy specific criteria in order to qualify for academic credit. Contact the Business Career Services Center in 125 Summerfield for information regarding the process of having an internship evaluated for academic credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the internship; two of the following: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A special variable-topic seminar open to seniors and graduate students meeting the requirements established by the faculty members offering the particular seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management-related topics not adequately covered in any regular course available to students of the School of Business. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to bridge internship experiences with a management training program. The management training program, a program developed by the Main Event Management Corporation, is designed to facilitate better management and professional competencies through control of real-world experiences and learning. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. IND
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An introduction to the University of Kansas and work done by professional engineers. Students are introduced to the resources available to them at KU, in the School of Engineering, and in the Chemical and petroleum Engineering Department. They are introduced to the curricula requirements and expectations of chemical engineering students. The career opportunities for chemical engineers are described. Students are introduced to engineering ethics, basic safety considerations, teamwork, and technical writing. The course includes fundamental calculations of material and energy balances and fluid flow. LEC
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A survey course on global energy supply and demand, production methods and energy economics. Course begins with the matrix of energy supply and demand focusing on fossil fuels and nuclear energy and includes transportation/ distribution patterns and issues and current production technologies. We then analyze alternate energy realities and potentials such as solar energy, wind energy, biomass utilization, hydrogen, fuel cells, hydroelectric, geothermal, wave/tidal, and others based on thermodynamic principles and economics. Course is also open to non-engineering students. LEC
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Formulation of engineering problems for machine computation with emphasis on good programming practices and the integration of appropriate computational and related tools. Solutions are computed using Excel, Visual Basic, and general purpose languages such as Mathcad and/or MATLAB. Computing methods are introduced as tools for developing solutions using elementary numerical techniques including linear interpolation, linear regression, numerical integration, and root finding. Microsoft Office is used with the computational tools to provide integrated report generation capability. Two lectures and weekly laboratory instruction. Prerequisite: MATH 121. LEC
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An introduction to principles of reservoir engineering and an application of economic principles will be introduced along with the use of computer spreadsheets. A mini petroleum engineering design project will be assigned to illustrate the integration of petroleum engineering principles and the use of computers. C&PE 127 is required of all Petroleum Engineering freshmen but is optional for others. Transfer students who don't take the course must substitute C&PE 127 with one hour of engineering science. LEC
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The application of the laws of chemistry, physics, and mathematics to the solution of material and energy balance problems occurring in the process industries. Prerequisite: C&PE 121 or consent of instructor and CHEM 188. LEC
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An introduction to modern rotary drilling. Topics covered include: rig systems/hardware, management practices, cost analysis, drilling fluid function formulations and testing, well control systems, cement formulation and placement, drilling bits. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts of heat, work, the first law and second law of thermodynamics, and equations of state. These concepts are applied to flow and non-flow systems including power, heat pump and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or Corequisite: C&PE 121 and PHSX 211. LEC
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Solutions of continuity, momentum, and energy equations applied to fluids in confined flow or flowing past submerged objects. Laminar and turbulent flows of both incompressible and compressible fluids are considered. Engineering applications include pressure drop and network analysis of piping and transmission lines, flow measurement and fluid moving equipment. Prerequisite: C&PE 221 and a course in differential equations, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Further development of the laws of thermodynamics to treat chemical and petroleum processes. Analysis and application of Gibbs and Maxwell relations. Development and use of partial molar properties and fugacities. Development, analysis and application of excess free energy relations, including equations of state and solution models, to analyze and describe phase equilibra. Prerequisite: C&PE 221. Prerequisite or Corequisite: C&PE 211. LEC
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Properties of porous rocks, reservoir fluids, and fluid saturated rocks. Introduction to multiphase flow in porous media including concepts of wettability, capillary pressure and relative permeability. Prerequisite: CHEM 188. Corequisite: C&PE 211. LEC
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An applied study of the various (conductive, convective, and radiative) heat transfer mechanisms in solid and fluid systems. Engineering applications include: conduction in solids and fluids, free and forced convection in fluids, simple and solar radiation, boiling and condensing fluids, and design of heat exchangers, evaporators, and furnaces. Prerequisite: C&PE 221 and a course in differential equations. LEC
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Consideration of the economic factors important in the development of the chemical or petroleum enterprise. Applications of economic evaluation methods to engineering project development. Consideration of risk and uncertainty in project development. Prerequisite: MATH 122, C&PE 121, PHSX 211, and C&PE 221 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Includes one credit hour of calculations laboratory. Treatment of mass transfer phenomena with application to analysis and design of unit operations equipment such as distillation, extraction, absorption, and adsorption. Prerequisite: C&PE 211, C&PE 511, and C&PE 512. Corequisite: C&PE 521. LEC
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Development and solution of the material and energy balance equations for continuous and batch reactors. These balance equations are applied in (a) the determination of intrinsic kinetics, (b) the design of reactors and (c) the analysis of reactor behavior. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction systems are considered. Prerequisite: C&PE 511, C&PE 512, and a course in differential equations. Corequisite: C&PE 521. LEC
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Lectures on single phase flow and pressure distribution in reservoirs. Calculations in drawdown, buildup, multiple rate, fractured systems, gas and injection well testing. Material balance calculations for gas, gas-condensate, undersaturated, and saturated reservoirs. Prerequisite: C&PE 517 or consent of instructor, a course in differential equations. LEC
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Analysis of well logs to determine properties of reservoir rocks, fluid saturations and lithology, and production logging. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in Petroleum Engineering or consent of instructor. LEC
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Undergraduate study in various branches of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering on topics that may vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Varies. LEC
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A discussion and project-based survey of environmental issues in chemical engineering, including environmentally conscious design, environmental fate and transport, green chemistry, and life cycle analysis. Focus will be on the design, implementation and management of comprehensive environmental assessments for existing and new industrial facilities with an emphasis on the technical and economic impacts of catalytic systems on pollution control strategies. LEC
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Synthesis, design and economic analysis of petrochemical, and chemical plants. Applications in computer aided engineering applied to these topics. Prerequisite: C&PE 521, C&PE 522, C&PE 523, and C&PE 524. Corequisite: C&PE 615. LEC
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Principles of reaction engineering and green chemistry applied to processes of the future. With a case-based introduction to the design and optimization of catalytic processes and reaction systems, focus will be on key reaction engineering concepts, including catalysis, mechanisms, reaction kinetics, heterogeneous reactions, reactor types and economic evaluation. Students will develop a multidisciplinary understanding of chemical, biological and molecular concepts and of the multiscale character of developing and designing processes from the micro level to the macro level. Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering to the physical/biological sciences. LEC
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The behavior of chemical processing equipment in the presence of disturbances in operating conditions is analyzed. Control systems are designed based on the criteria of system stability and optional system performance. Prerequisite: C&PE 523 and C&PE 524. LEC
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Laboratory study of chemical engineering concepts of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction kinetics. Includes emphasis on technical communication skills. Prerequisite: C&PE 523, C&PE 524, and ENGL 102. LAB
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Design and analysis of rotary drilling and well completion systems; casing design, cementing, and perforating. Prerequisite: C&PE 527 and C&PE 511 or ME 610. LEC
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Study of waterflooding based upon linear displacement theory. Extension to two and three dimensions through correlations and stream tube models. Design of waterfloods including preparation of a reservoir description for waterflood evaluation. Prerequisite: C&PE 527. LEC
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Laboratory study of methods to determine rock and fluid properties related to petroleum engineering including phase behavior, viscosity, permeability, porosity, capillary pressure, and drilling fluid properties. Analysis of experimental uncertainty. Oral and written presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and C&PE 527. LAB
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A continuation of C&PE 613 with emphasis on individual student process design development and analysis. Prerequisite: C&PE 613, C&PE 615. LEC
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An introductory course designed to acquaint students to topics including chemical plant and environmental accident analysis; review of hazard evaluation procedures including fault tree, hazard and operability studies and human error analysis; safety equipment design; EPA and TOSCA criteria and ethical considerations. Prerequisite: C&PE 613 and C&PE 615. LEC
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Laboratory study of chemical engineering concepts of thermodynamics, fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, reaction kinetics, and process control. Includes emphasis on technical communication skills. Prerequisite: ENGL 102, C&PE 523, C&PE 524, C&PE 615. LAB
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Design and analysis of natural production and artificial lift systems, including beam pumping, gas lift, and submersible pumps. Vertical and horizontal two phase flow, compression, metering, acidizing, fracturing, and pipe line flow systems. Prerequisite: C&PE 617. LEC
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Design problems related to petroleum reservoir development such as selection of optimum well spacing for a specified reservoir, evaluation of a producing property or installation of a waterflood. Designs consider economic, uncertainty analysis, as well as conservation, environmental, and professional ethics factors. Prerequisite: C&PE 522, C&PE 527, and C&PE 618. LEC
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Continuation of C&PE 619 emphasizing surface and subsurface operations such as laboratory experiments related to compressible and incompressible fluid flow through the pipe and measurement of the heat transfer coefficients, properties of drilling fluids and strength of cement. Additional topics include core displacement experiments, vapor-liquid equilibrium and dissolving power of HCl acid, application of statistics to reservoir data, oral and written presentation. Prerequisite: C&PE 619. LAB
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Investigation of a particular problem in the field of chemical or petroleum engineering. IND
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Introductory and advanced topics in biocatalysis with focus on enzymatic reactions. Enzymology will provide the fundamental basis for discussion of kinetics and bio-process development. Advanced topics include: enzymes in non-aqueous solvents, immobilization techniques, whole-cell transformations, bio-reactors. LEC
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An overview of various processes to fabricate semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Topics covered include crystal growth, oxidation, solid-state diffusion, ion implantation, photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, epitaxial growth, metalization, and plasma etching of thin films. (Same as EECS 670.) Prerequisite: Senior standing in C&PE or EE or consent of instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of biomedical engineering. This course covers a breadth of topics including biotransport, biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, drug delivery, biomedical imaging, computational biology, and biotechnology. Students are exposed to these broad topics, and go further in depth in a topic of their choice with the semester project. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior-level standing in Engineering or consent of instructor. LEC
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Polymer Science and Technology is a 3-hour introductory course to polymer chemistry, science, technology, and processing. The course targets junior, senior, and graduate chemical engineers and chemistry majors and is intended to provide a background which would allow young professionals to understand polymer chemistry and processes to which they would be exposed to in industry and literature. The course would also assist them in selecting polymers and polymer specifications. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate student standing in chemical or petroleum engineering, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course involves the investigation of a particular problem in the field of chemical or petroleum engineering. C&PE 661 should be taken, rather than C&PE 651, for students seeking Departmental Honors in Chemical Petroleum Engineering. C&PE 661 may also be used by students in the Honors Program to help satisfy the course requirement of this program. The design or research topic is identified jointly by the student and faculty research supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of C&PE 121, C&PE 211, C&PE 511, C&PE 512, C&PE 522, overall GPA >3.5, and engineering GPA >3.5, or permission of the department. IND
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Study of methods for solving optimization problems encountered in engineering and the natural sciences, with specific applications illustrating analytical and numerical techniques. Topics covered include methods, penalty functions, linear programming, nonlinear and integer programming, stochastic optimization approaches, and treatment of constrained problems. A semester project is required. Prerequisite: Senior standing. LEC
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