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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An introduction to the basic color theories and their application. Presentation of the relationship between pigment and light, and of additive and subtractive color mixing. Prerequisite: AFND 101 and AFND 103. LAB
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The development of form and surface through the use of handbuilding and wheel thrown techniques. Stoneware and Raku will be explored. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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Introduction to metalsmithing and jewelry design, materials and processes. Student projects will explore the joining, forming, and surface embellishment of metals such as copper, brass, bronze, and sterling. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104 . LAB
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Application of art and design principles to four-harness loom structures. Emphasis on the use of color and texture in loom controlled and weaver controlled techniques. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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Fundamentals of resist and dye techniques on textiles: batik, tie-dye, discharge, and direct application. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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Studio exploration of fibers as an art form. Techniques include feltmaking, papermaking, basketry, and dyeing. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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Design problems in textile printing with emphasis on screenprinting and photo techniques. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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Exploration of basic materials as media; the interrelationship of materials and methods. Prerequisite: AFND 102 and DFND 104. LAB
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An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. LEC
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This course introduces students to the principles of scientific inquiry in applied behavioral science: objectivity, definitions, observation, reliability, validity, correlation and its limitations, causation, experimental design and analysis, and the interpretation of data. These principles are presented in the context of solving individual and societal problems across the lifespan, for example, in early childhood education, public health, developmental disabilities (e.g., autism), delinquency, independent living for people with disabilities, educational systems, and gerontology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to rationales, methods, and findings resulting from the empirical study of human behavior. Readings, lectures, videos, and classroom demonstrations are used to illustrate various principles of behavior and techniques of application. These principles are organized into a general theory of human conduct that is contrasted with alternative explanations of human behavior. Students learn basic principles of scientific method and their implications for behavioral science and human affairs. (Formerly HDFL 140.) LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. (Formerly HDFL 150.) LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. (Formerly HDFL 151.) LEC
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An introduction to child behavior and development with an emphasis on the normal developmental range of growth, intelligence, cognition, emotion, language, and social skills from birth to adolescence. (Formerly HDFL 160.) LEC
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This course focuses on the family unit and the factors that affect its development. Topics include dating and cohabitation; family and lifestyle diversity; parental roles and child development; divorce and stepfamilies. The course emphasizes research related to these issues. (Formerly HDFL 288.) LEC
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A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to applied behavioral science at the freshman/sophomore level. course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC
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An advanced examination of the principles of applied behavior analysis as used to address problems in developmental disabilities, childhood autism, language development, early childhood education, with adolescent and family life, and in normal everyday adult behavior. Issues in measurement, design, and evaluation of the effects of applied behavior analysis procedures and ethical implications of the use of these procedures are examined. Procedures used to teach and maintain appropriate behaviors, eliminate inappropriate behaviors, and develop comprehensive behavioral intervention programs are described. (Formerly HDFL 304.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101 or ABSC/HDFL 140. LEC
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Examines research methods used to identify, describe, understand, and intervene on socially important problems occurring across the life span (e.g., early childhood, adolescence, elders) and in varied settings (homes, classrooms, group-care facilities, and communities). Discusses research methods and concepts (e.g., prediction, experimental control, reliability, validity) within scientific, psychological, and behavior-analytic frameworks. Presents strategies and tactics regarding descriptive and experimental methods, direct and indirect measurement, graphical and statistical analysis, and single-subject and group experimental designs. Examines ethics and social responsibility in research. Provides opportunities to read primary and secondary sources, develop research questions, write and present research proposals, and assist in the conduct of research projects. (Formerly HDFL 308.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 140 or ABSC/HDFL 304. LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 310.) LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 311.) Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An overview of environmental, cultural, and biological influences of adult development and aging. Course material is organized in terms of topics, rather than presenting a chronological account. (Formerly HDFL 342.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101, ABSC/HDFL 140, ABSC/HDFL 150/151, or ABSC/HDFL 160. LEC
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Students learn about methods of teaching children with autism and about evaluating those methods. Topics include: basic methods of teaching as applied to imitation, productive and receptive language, self-help skills, and engagement in community activities, as well as observation and measurement of behavior in community settings and evaluating consumer satisfaction. The course consists of classroom lectures, discussions, demonstrations, examinations, and completion of laboratory and observation assignments. Enrollment priority is given to majors who intend to do practicum work with children with autism. (Formerly HDFL 350.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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This course introduces students to the field of early childhood education. Contemporary perspectives and professional practices are examined through an analysis of historical and philosophical ideologies. (Formerly HDFL 356.) Prerequisite: ABSC/ HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC
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The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as PSYC 405 and THR 405) (Formerly HDFL 405.) LEC
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Addresses some of the basic behavioral techniques used with juveniles who have problems in school, at home, or in the community: readings and role-playing sessions covering assessment of problems, relationship development, observing and defining behavior, teaching and contracting techniques, and counseling. (Formerly HDFL 410.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 140; ABSC/ HDFL 304 highly recommended. LEC
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Students read new materials, become more fluent with ABSC 100 content, and acquire tutoring skills. Course may not be repeated. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 and consent of the instructor and department chair. LEC
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This course examines aspects of different cultures and ethnic groups, and the definitions of gender role behavior found in them. The research literature in these areas is reviewed and the implications for early childhood education settings are studied. The course examines this literature in order to provide an increased understanding of effective approaches to educational practices directly related to the structure of society in the United States. (Formerly HDFL 433.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC
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A multi-disciplinary seminar exploring theory, method, research, and practice in independent living. The course reviews personal and environmental factors as they relate to everyday problems affecting people with varying disabilities. It also contains service-learning activities in which students apply skills and knowledge gained in the classroom. (Formerly HDFL 437.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in social sciences or consent of the instructor. LEC
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A survey of educational materials and activities appropriate for young children. Students explore several components of effective curriculum development (e.g., objectives, methods of activity presentation, teaching strategies) and learn to integrate them to construct curricula for a range of content and skill areas. By focusing on functional components of a curriculum, students learn to construct, critically evaluate, and modify curricula for typically and atypically developing children. (Formerly HDFL 444.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 100/101, ABSC/HDFL 140, or ABSC/HDFL 304. LEC
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This course addresses children's health, safety, and nutritional needs and contemporary approaches to achieving wellness. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. Current research results are emphasized and applied to course problem sets and projects. (Formerly HDFL 455.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge. LEC
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A course designed for the study of special topics in applied behavioral science. Course content addresses major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC
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A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to topics in applied behavioral science at the junior/senior level. course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC
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Theoretical approaches to the study of parenting and parent-child relationships, techniques for analyzing common parenting problems, designing appropriate interventions, fostering effective communication skills, understanding issues of diversity, and promoting parent education programs. Professional collaboration and support of families and children are emphasized throughout. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. (Formerly HDFL 486.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC
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A course designed for directed readings in applied behavioral science. Readings address major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 484.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND
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Basic and applied research experience. The course provides training in research methods, measures, and designs, and the conduct of research, in the behavioral sciences. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH
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This course provides a survey of modern behavioral science and its applications. It reviews the field's history; integrates its sub-disciplines; situates it within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities; and compares and contrasts it with other perspectives. It covers recent advances in research, their implications for understanding human behavior, and their application to solving societal problems. And, it addresses the ethical implications of applied behavioral science. (Formerly HDFL/ PSYC 641.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101 or ABSC/HDFL 140, and ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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A review of contemporary psychological and developmental disorders of children and youth. Course presents current models of psychopathology, classification systems, assessment methods, and treatment approaches designed for the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention is given to age, gender, and cultural differences and similarities. Topics include: anxiety disorders, oppositional behavior disorders, physical/sexual abuse, learning disabilities, depression, chronic physical illness, and autism. (Same as PSYC 535.) (Formerly HDFL 535.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, or instructor permission. LEC
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This course will provide an overview of social and behavioral problems faced by older adults, people who provide for elders, and human service programs for elders. It also surveys empirically-derived intervention strategies designed to maintain abilities and reduce or eliminate problem behaviors experienced by elders or their caregivers. (Formerly HDFL 542.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 and ABSC/HDFL 308, or instructor permission. LEC
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This course provides an overview of professional, social, legal, and economic issues associated with the administration of early childhood services and programs. Emphasis is placed on theoretical principles, empirical research, and professional responsibilities inherent in the provision of quality service, including needs assessment, organizational skills, delivery systems, human resource management, communication skills, grant writing, legal and ethical considerations, and advocacy. (Formerly HDFL 555.) Prerequisite: Senior standing in the early childhood specialty area or instructor permission. LEC
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An overview of the juvenile justice system, including the history, development, and current controversy over children's rights in the legal system examined in light of relevant principles of behavioral science and behavioral systems of rehabilitation. Topics include delinquency, miscreancy, status offenses, dependent-neglected children, child abuse, and juvenile court procedures and personnel (e.g., probation officers), and rehabilitative programs. (Formerly HDFL 560.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100. LEC
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An advanced study of the application of theories and concepts of developmental and behavioral psychology to a range of specific issues and problems of childhood and adolescence. This course relies heavily on the empirical research literature. Topics include contemporary social issues and child development, research in applied settings, assessment, intervention, and prevention, as well as program evaluation. (Same as PSYC 565.) (Formerly HDFL 565.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, and ABSC/HDFL/ PSYC 535. LEC
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A two-semester course combining small group discussions of selected, advanced topics in applied behavioral science with honors thesis supervision on a project of the student's own design. Students normally enroll for one or two hours in fall semester and three to five hours in spring semester. (Formerly HDFL 496.) Prerequisite: ABSC 304, ABSC/HDFL 308, and instructor permission. IND
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Structured opportunities to develop and apply knowledge and skills (e.g., analyzing problems, strategic planning, intervention, evaluation) in a project that addresses a community problem or goal. (Formerly HDFL 606.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND
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This course reviews basic and applied research in the social, behavioral, and neural sciences on how environmental variables, brain mechanisms, individual history, and cultural constraints interact and maintain drug abuse. Topics include the mechanisms of drug action; the safety, toxicity, stimulus properties, and functional impairments related to commonly abused drugs; common models of treatment and prevention; and historical and current legislative and judicial approach to drug abuse. (Formerly HDFL 620.) Prerequisite: A course in biology and a course in either applied behavioral science or psychology. LEC
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Impact of factors of social environment and physical growth upon psychological development from puberty to young adulthood. (Same as PSYC 626.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104, PSYC 333, or HDFL/ABSC 160. LEC
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An advanced course in child development that includes a survey of the field's principles and theoretical approaches, and current issues in research and practice. Topics will include: prenatal development, cognition and language, social-emotional development, socialization influences in childhood, developmental psychopathology, and social policies. (Formerly HDFL 632.) (Same as PSYC 632.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160, PSYC 333, or instructor permission, and senior or graduate status. LEC
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This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. (Formerly HDFL 671) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. Students design an intervention research project. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program; ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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Experience in a classroom-based early intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 558.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. FLD
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An advanced practicum providing experience in classroom-based early-intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 559.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 558 or ABSC 675, and instructor permission. FLD
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A one-semester practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 492.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD
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A one-semester advanced practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 493.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 492 or ABSC 677, and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD
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A two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised training in one of several ongoing research projects in the field of behavior analysis, either basic or applied. Students assist in conducting research and participate in individual and group meetings to discuss and evaluate research and related methodological issues. (Formerly HDFL 688.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 308 and instructor permission. FLD
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Students participate in an intensive behavioral treatment program teaching language, social skills, self-help skills, and academic skills to young children with autism. Students learn: to develop and implement treatment programs; design and use of a system of data collection and analysis; and apply the principles and philosophy of community and school mainstreaming. (Formerly HDFL 550.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 350 and instructor permission. LAB
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A one or two-semester practicum in which students are provided with the opportunity to work directly with developmentally disabled adults in either community-based residential or day treatment programs. Students are required to read relevant literature, carry out treatment programs, and participate in weekly meetings to discuss treatment goals and progress. (Formerly HDFL 696.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304, ABSC/HDFL 410, and instructor permission. FLD
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A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised training in behavioral gerontology. Students: (a) read literature in the area of their specific practicum setting such as adult day care, senior centers, nursing homes; (b) assist in collecting information relevant to evaluating the program effectiveness of their efforts on behalf of the elderly; and (c) participate in discussions and planning meetings relevant to maintenance and improvement of operation of the practicum. (Formerly HDFL 644.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 342 or ABSC/HDFL 542 and instructor permission. FLD
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A two-semester practicum in which students engage in structured opportunities to practice core competencies related to the work of promoting community health and development (e.g., strategic planning, intervention, evaluation). In weekly group meetings, students prepare for their individual working field settings (e.g., health and human service agencies, research and advocacy organizations, community organizations). (Formerly HDFL 690). Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 150, ABSC/HDFL 310, and instructor permission. FLD
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A two-semester practicum in which students engage in structured opportunities to practice core competencies related to the work of promoting community health and development (e.g., strategic planning, intervention, evaluation). In weekly group meetings, students prepare for their individual working field settings (e.g., health and human service agencies, research and advocacy organizations, community organizations). (Formerly HDFL 692). Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program; ABSC/HDFL 151, ABSC/HDFL 311 and instructor permission. FLD
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Practical supervised training in the laboratory study of human and/or animal behavior. Students assist in conducting basic research, read and discuss research articles, attend lab meetings, and acquire data analysis and presentation skills. Prerequisite: ABSC 308 (or concurrent enrollment) and permission of the instructor. RSH
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Practical supervised training in the historical and conceptual foundations of applied behavioral science (e.g., behavior analysis). Students research and read primary source literatures and write papers that advances our understanding of the field's foundations (e.g., empirical, theoretical). Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101, ABSC 304, ABSC 308, and ABSC 509 (or concurrent enrollment), and permission of instructor. IND
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A one-semester practicum providing opportunities for students to aid professionals in the development and implementation of behavioral treatment plans with adolescents. Regularly scheduled individual and group meetings enable the evaluation of the practicum students' progress while working in the rehabilitative process for juveniles who have problems that can bring them into contact with the juvenile justice system. (Formerly HDFL 694.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 410, ABSC/HDFL 560, and instructor permission. FLD
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A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty adviser and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an adviser about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD
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A one or two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty adviser and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an adviser about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program and instructor permission. FLD
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A one or two-semester research practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on research training outside the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty adviser and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an adviser about this practicum early in their junior year. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD
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A one or two-semester research practicum providing opportunities for supervised, hands-on research training outside of the existing specialty areas or their options. This practicum must be arranged with the prior approval of a faculty adviser and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students should see an adviser early in their junior year about the practicum and its prerequisites and requirements. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program and instructor permission. FLD
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