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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Independent study and preparation of honors thesis. Required of all students working for a degree with honors in Slavic languages and literatures. IND
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Study and discussion of contemporary problems in Russia and the former Soviet Union; readings in Russian, based on articles in newspapers, journals, etc. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or equivalent. LEC
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An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of Russian cultural and societal development in the modern era. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Majors and graduate students in Slavic languages and literatures will be required to do readings in Russian. LEC
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The course is designed to acquaint students with the shifting manner of public discourse in Post-Soviet Russia and help them to explore in some depth cross-cultural communication between America and Russia. In addition to contemporary and historical background on Russian communicative practices, students examine discourse in business development, mass media, marketing, and advertising. All readings in English. (Same as COMS 503). LEC
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An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of East-Central European cultural and societal development in the modern era. Countries that may be considered are: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, the South Slavic countries, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Belorussia, and Ukraine. LEC
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This study-abroad trip offers a survey of Czech art, architecture, literature, theater, and film from the medieval period to the present with emphasis on the late 19th and 20th centuries. Combines 18 hours of lectures on campus and a ten-day trip to Prague. LEC
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A survey of West Slavic Literature and Civilization (Polish and Czech) from its beginnings to the present with emphasis on the most important trends: Renaissance, Romanticism, Positivism/Realism, Modernism and Avant-guard; Socialist realism, and Post-modernism. The course combines lecture, discussion and small group activities. Movie clips, recordings, and slides are used to reflect various cultural dimensions of West Slavic Civilization. No knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC
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An introductory survey of the literature and culture of the South Slavic peoples: the Slovenes, Croats, Bosniacs, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians and Bulgarians. No language required. LEC
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Topics and problems in Russian cultural history as treated in the masterworks of Russian literature. Readings selected from the works of Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and other great Russian writers. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will do some of the readings in Russian. LEC
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The course asks how fiction written in Central Europe engaged and grappled with the totalitarian experience imposed by Nazi and Soviet forms of government. The course focuses on the works by 20th-century Polish, Czech, and Hungarian writers that deal with totalitarianism. (Same as HWC 514.) LEC
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A comparative study of several most representative and best works of 19th- and 20th-century Polish and Czech fiction and drama and their film adaptations. By providing a broad cultural and historical background of the works, the course offers a thorough introduction to modern culture of Poland and the Czech Republic. Readings and discussions are in English, and no knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC
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An analysis of the phonological and morphological systems of contemporary standard Russian, including normative and dialectal pronunciation of speech sounds, phonemics, morphophonemic alterations, and nominal and verbal inflections. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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An analysis of morphosyntax and the lexicon in contemporary standard Russian, with emphasis on the sentence and its elements. Designed as a continuation of SLAV 520. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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An examination of changes in the Russian language during the course of this century. Topics covered include changes in pronunciation, morphological and syntactic variation, and the impact of foreign borrowings, particularly from English. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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The course is intended as an introduction to the most significant writers and works in Slavic literatures. The emphasis will be on some of the themes and ideological concepts that have shaped the literatures of the Slavic world. Representative works of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Mrozek, Rozewicz, Capek, Hasek, Djilas, Havel, Ivo Andric and others, will be studied. The diversity of expression and, at the same time, homogeneity of spirit in the works of these writers will be stressed. No knowledge of Slavic languages is required. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of Russian versification and to masterpieces of Russian poetry selected from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Students will learn to read, translate, and analyze poems in terms of rhyme, meter, euphony, metaphor, and other prosodic features. Emphasis will be placed upon preparing students for independent study and appreciation of Russian poetry in the original. Prerequisite: Language proficiency. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Fyodor Dostoevsky. In translation. No prerequisite. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Leo Tolstoy. In translation. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Ivan Turgenev. In translation; however, note that Russian majors will be required to read selected works in Russian. LEC
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A study of the development of the Polish short story from Positivism to the present. Readings of major Polish writers including Prus, Sienkiewicz, Schulz, Borowski, Andrzejewski, and others. Emphasis on trends in the Polish short story within the context of West European literatures. No prerequisites. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Polish will read some works in Polish. LEC
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The course treats the formation of modern nation states as defined by language, where the history of the linguistic community played a central, if mythic role. Focus is on sociolinguistic case studies of the connection between language and identity in the former USSR and Yugoslavia, as well as transnational groups defined by common language and culture. The impact of global English, EU membership, and migration on language and identity issues are also discussed. LEC
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Individually tailored course work in Slovene, from beginning to advanced level. Can include development of all four skills depending on the needs of the student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Basic introduction to the language, with emphasis on grammar and reading skills. Prerequisite: Two years of a different Slavic language at the college level. LEC
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A course of readings and discussion of grammar in a Slavic language as a continuation of SLAV 560, for example, in Bulgarian, Macedonian, etc. Prerequisite: SLAV 560 or the equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from 1898 to the present. Lectures and readings in English. (Same as THR 725.) LEC
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An exploration of the "woman question" in nineteenth-century Russia as treated in literary texts. Authors to be included are: Tolstoy, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, as well as women writers such as Karolina Pavlova and Evgeniia Tur, and prominent literary and social critics. Readings in English. LEC
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This course traces the various manifestations of the Devil through Russian and European folklore, myth, theology, culture, and literature. Although the focus is on Russian literature, classic European works are discussed, as they had a powerful impact on the modern Russian Conception of the Evil One. Readings in English. (Same as HWC 566.) LEC
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An exploration of the creative process of modern Russian literature (1700 to present) through the ways in which Russian writers have responded to the Bible, the cornerstone of both Western and Eastern Christianity. LEC
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Examination in depth of the historical, social, intellectual, and artistic development of one or more major Slavic urban centers. LEC
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Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and others with an introduction to Russian culture. Lectures and readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the principal Russian authors and literary works of the 19th and/or 20th century. Readings in English, no prerequisites for non-Russian majors. Students with a sound knowledge of Russian will be expected to do some of the readings in Russian. LEC
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A survey of recent Russian and Soviet literature. Lectures and readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC
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Introduction to the phenomena and problems of Slavic folklore. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian on the college level. LEC
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The course is for students who wish to understand the prehistory of Eastern Europe with special attention to the Slavs. The interdisciplinary course examines East European prehistory from the perspectives of archaeology and linguistics, considering also how ideologies have influenced the interpretation of results. No language prerequisite. (Same as ANTH 696) LEC
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Lectures, reading, and analysis of Pushkin's "novel in verse." Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language courses or the equivalent. LEC
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Readings from the short stories of major Russian writers of the 19th and/or 20th centuries, e.g., Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov; readings and discussion in English for non-Russian majors, Russian majors will be expected to read most stories in Russian. Prerequisite: None for non-majors in the department; two years of college-level Russian for majors. LEC
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Readings from Kantemir, Trediakovsky, Lomonosov, Derzhavin, Karamzin, and others in their literary and intellectual contexts. Readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC
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Readings from the prose works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. In translation. No prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will be required to have achieved senior standing and will read most works in Russian. LEC
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Readings from late Tolstoy through the period of the 1920's. In translation; no prerequisites for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will be required to have achieved senior standing and will read most works in Russian. LEC
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Readings in the period, in all genres. In translation; no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors are required to have senior standing and read most works in Russian. LEC
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A survey of post-Soviet literary art, from approximately 1985 to the present, dealing with a range of subjects including the emergence of literature from the strictures of socialist realism and its relationship to concepts of postmodernism and postcolonialism. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Vladimir Nabokov. In translation. No prerequisite. LEC
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Directed individual readings on various topics concerning Slavic linguistics. Prerequisite: Proficiency in at least one Slavic language, and consent of instructor. IND
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Intensive study of a selected topic from Slavic languages, literatures, linguistics, or pedagogy. IND
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A study of philosophical, theological, and literary monuments designed to acquaint the student with main cultural forces that have shaped Russian thought and manners. From the origins to Peter the Great. (Same as PHIL 684.) LEC
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A continuation of SLAV 684. From the age of Peter the Great to revolutions of 1917. (Same as PHIL 686.) LEC
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The Slavic languages and peoples, including briefly: their origin, prehistory, and early culture. Basic linguistic methodology as applied to Slavic material from the beginnings of Slavic linguistics to the present. LEC
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Readings from the works of the major poets, in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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Readings from the works of the major poets, in Russian. Prerequisite: Language proficiency. LEC
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A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from their beginnings to 1900. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Russian will read some works in Russian. LEC
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A study of the development of Russian theatre and dramatic literature from 1953 to the present. Readings in English. Students with knowledge of Russian will read some works in Russian. LEC
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A study of the various literary periods, such as sentimentalism, romanticism, naturalism, realism, with particular reference to individual literary critics and critical journals. LEC
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A survey of the works of Solovyov, Florensky, Berdyaev, Merezhkovsky, Ivanov, and others, and their relation to the literature and culture of the Silver Age. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Alexander Pushkin. Readings in Russian, open to senior Russian majors and graduate students. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Anton Chekhov. Open to senior Russian majors and graduate students. Readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC
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A study of the life and works of the Symbolist writers, Andrei Bely and Aleksandr Blok. Readings in Russian. LEC
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Readings from the works of Turgenev, Chekhov, Leskov, Saltykov, and others. Readings and discussion in English. Russian majors will be expected to read some works in Russian. No prerequisite. LEC
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A study of representative works in all genres, by Russian emigre writers. Readings in English. LEC
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An introduction to the technical problems of literary and philosophical research in the field of Russian studies. LEC
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A course in the first written language of the Slavs (9-12th centuries AD), with discussion of Indo-European, Baltic and Common Slavic background. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian or the study of another ancient Indo-European language. LEC
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The linguistic history of Russian from the emergence of East Slavic dialects of Common Slavic to the modern period, with emphasis on fundamental structural changes and the introduction of skills necessary for the reading and analysis of Old and Middle Russian texts. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian or the equivalent. LEC
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An examination of the Russian language from its beginnings to the 17th century through close reading of Old and Middle Russian texts and reading and discussion of the literature on issues in Russian historical linguistics. Prerequisite: SLAV 748, SLAV 750, or equivalent. LEC
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Synchronic study of the contemporary Russian language with special emphasis on problems of functional morphology and syntax. Prerequisite: Three years of Russian language study or its equivalent. LEC
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Topics in Slavic linguistics. Content will vary. May be repeated. LEC
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An examination of the development of the Slavic languages from the Common Slavic period to the present, proceeding from Indo-European. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Russian. LEC
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An examination of the linguistic phenomena and historical development of the East Slavic languages (Russian, Belorussian, and Ukrainian). Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Russian. LEC
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An examination of linguistic phenomena and historical development of the West Slavic languages (Polish, Czech, Slovak, and Upper and Lower Sorbian). LEC
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An examination of linguistic phenomena and historical development of Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian-Serbian, Slovene. LEC
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Readings of selected texts in Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 752. LEC
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An investigation of specific themes or authors in the literature, culture, and thought of the 18th century. All readings in Russian. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and advanced Russian language. SEM
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Required for all teaching assistants, assistant instructors engaged in the teaching of Slavic languages and persons planning for careers in teaching Slavic languages. Combines discussion of theoretical teaching concepts with practical solution of problems arising concurrently in Slavic language courses. Students enrolled for two or three hours will study advanced Slavic grammar topics and stylistics as they apply to the teaching of Slavic languages. LEC
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Individual work in language or literature of the teaching of Slavic languages by qualified students under direction of members of the department. RSH
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Required for all teaching assistants, assistant instructors engaged in the teaching of Slavic languages and persons planning for careers in teaching Slavic languages. Combines discussion of theoretical teaching concepts with practical solution of problems arising currently in Slavic language courses. Students enrolled for two or three hours will study advanced Slavic grammar topics and stylistics as they apply to the teaching of Slavic languages. LEC
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A regular seminar for graduate students, devoted to special problems in Russian literature. (Ancient Russian literature, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Symbolism, etc.) Designed to introduce the student to the more advanced methods in criticism, literary analysis, and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Slavic Languages and Literatures, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Various topics including pre- and post-Revolutionary poetry, the prose of the 1920s, the development of Socialist Realism, individual authors, etc. LEC
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Topics in Slavic linguistics. Content will vary. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Ph.D. student in Slavic Languages and Literatures. LEC
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Synchronic examination of specific topics, i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology of several Slavic languages. LEC
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Diachronic examination of selected topics, i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, or lexicology, of one or more Slavic languages. LEC
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Examination of selected topics in Russian cultural history, especially as treated in the works of Russian literature and intellectual history. Prerequisite: At least one course in Russian history, or one of the following courses--SLAV 502, SLAV 510, SLAV 684, SLAV 686, plus graduate standing. LEC
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Investigation and concentrated study of one or more themes (e.g., mythology, demonology, life rituals, folklore and literature), figures (e.g., Baba Yaga), or genres (e.g., magic tales, byliny, riddles) of Slavic folklore. All readings in Russian. Prerequisite: SLAV 630. SEM
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Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Slavic Languages and Literatures. LEC
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The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 304. LEC
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The study of social life, including how human groups are organized, how they change, and how they influence individuals. Consideration is given to a variety of human organizations and social institutions and how these groups and institutions both determine, and are determined by, human beings. Open only to students on dean's honor roll or enrolled in Honors Program, or consent of instructor. May not be taken by those who also have credit for SOC 304. LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 112 or SOC 112. (Same as AMS 110.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary introduction to individual and group identities over time. Students explore theories and methods relating to identity from various perspectives, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and region. Not open to students who have taken AMS 110 or SOC 110. (Same as AMS 112.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval by the American Studies Program. LEC
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Description and analysis of the culture, structure, and development of societies that are historically unrelated to the traditions of Western civilization. LEC
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Description and analysis of the culture, structure, and development of societies that are historically unrelated to the traditions of Western Civilization. Open only to students enrolled in the University Honors program or by consent of instructor. May not be taken by students who have credit in SOC 130. LEC
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The social structure and organization of American society with special reference to long-term and recent social changes. Not open to students who have credit for AMS 330 or SOC 330. Open to College honors students, students on the dean's honor roll, and by permission of the department. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention is paid to the influence of factors like language, culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. May not be taken by anyone who has completed SOC 305 or its equivalent. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention will be paid to the influence of factors like language and culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 305. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to explore competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. The course critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of these problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. May not be taken by anyone who has already completed SOC 306 or its equivalent. LEC
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Explores competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. Critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of these problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 160 or SOC 306. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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Analysis of the family as a social institution primarily in the U.S. context. Topics considered are: current and historical changes in how the family is constituted, contrasting sociological theories of family relationships, sexuality in relation to family life, the coexistence of love and hate in families, family dissolution and reformation, and the care of children. A key theme is diversity: social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and age. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 308 or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the Latino/a population (Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Dominican-Americans, and Central and South Americans) in the US. Students discuss how US and Latin American societies have shaped Latino incorporation into the United States. We also discuss contemporary political, cultural and social issues that pertain to Latinos/as in the US. (Same as AMS 260) LEC
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A sociological exploration of the image and status of women in society, including family, work, and politics. Socialization, education, and the women's movement are also analyzed. Includes an introduction to feminist theories in sociology. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Sociology at the freshman/sophomore level. Course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. No more than 6 hours of SOC 295 or SOC 495 may count towards the Sociology major or minor. LEC
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An introduction to sociological concepts, methods, and substantive findings more intensive than that provided in SOC 104. Students may take this course in lieu of SOC 104 to satisfy requirements for the major and the minor. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 104. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention is paid to the influence of factors like language, culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 150. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 150 or its equivalent. LEC
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