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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Focuses on biological, cognitive/affective, and social causes and effects of pain. Emphasis on basic research methods in pain, origins of pain, and how the experience of pain alters many aspects of the individual's life. Topics include anatomy and physiology of pain, impact of pain on a variety of aspects of individuals' lives, treatments for pain, and the role of various health care professionals in treating pain. Discussions also will include basic research methods in pain, tools for assessing pain, barriers to adequate pain management, and ethical/legal/public policy issues in working with pain patients. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Based on the biopsychosocial model, this course focuses on the current practice of palliative care in community and hospital settings by health care professionals. Classes will be discussion based, centered on current issues and controversies in care of the chronically ill and dying. Recent research will be highlighted, as will cultural perspectives on death. Students will be expected to identify applicable literature for presentation and class discussion, along with assigned readings. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A seminar devoted to examination of psychosocial and behavioral factors in women's health. Content areas include women and the health care system, social roles and health, gender differences, and similarities in morbidity and mortality, gynecologic health, chronic diseases, and health-related behaviors. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related field, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Theories and research on conceptualization, assessment, and effects of stress. Focus on coping processes and other determinants of adjustment to stressful conditions. Discussion of psychological interventions for managing stress and trauma. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or related fields. LEC
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Specialized advanced practicum in clinical health psychology, with an area of emphasis mutually defined by student and instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD
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Addresses psychological and behavioral effects of drugs, including psychotropic medications. A central theme is that effects of drugs frequently cannot be characterized solely from a pharmacological perspective. Thus, emphasis will be placed on examining the interaction of pharmacological and behavioral variables. For example, how do psychological factors moderate responses to drugs? The nature of this area assumes some knowledge of general psychology, research methods, biology, chemistry, neurophysiology, and the nervous system. Specific course structure will be modified to suit student interests. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or health-related fields, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Reviews recent research and application in the field of mental health and aging. Theoretical perspectives appropriate for understanding mental health issues with increased age are discussed. The epidemiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment methods associated with a variety of mental health conditions are surveyed. The community mental health resources available for older adults are discussed as well as practically-related issues such as evaluations of functional independence and competency among older adults. Prerequisite: Graduate student in psychology or related health field, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Intensive investigations of the processes involved in impression formation and of the effects of established impressions upon interpersonal communications. (Same as COMS 835.) Prerequisite: PSYC 670 or COMS 535. LEC
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Lecture, laboratory, fieldwork, and supervision appointment. Psychological evaluation and treatment of children and their families; supervised, progressive experience in psychological interventions in clinical child psychology. (Same as ABSC 846, formerly HDFL 846.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD
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A continuation of ABSC 846/PSYC 846. (Same as ABSC 847, formerly HDFL 847.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD
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Introduction to the history, methods and theory underlying psychological assessment techniques and methods. Students learn to administer, score, and interpret mental status exams and intelligence tests for children, adolescents and adults. Structured diagnostic assessments are introduced and practiced. Psychological report writing is introduced and practiced. The psychometric theory underlying the construction and validation of personality assessment instruments is reviewed. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology or consent of instructor. FLD
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Study and experimental investigation of acoustic, psychoacoustic, and psychological phenomena as they influence music. Attention will be given to physical parameters; perception of pitch, loudness, and timbre; magnitude estimation; theories of consonance; experimental aesthetics; and measurement and prediction of musical ability. Each student will be expected to complete an experiment or quasi-experiment related to human musical behavior. (Same as MEMT 953.) Prerequisite: PSYC 453 or equivalent; or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, laboratory and fieldwork. Students learn to administer, score and interpret various personality assessment instruments. Students apply skills acquired in previous course work to write integrated psychological assessment reports based on anamnesis, structured interview data, intelligence tests, and both objective and projective personality assessment instruments. Prerequisite: PSYC 850 or consent of instructor. FLD
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Reviews neural development and the brain-behavior relationships in intact, injured, and diseased brain systems. Details basic issues in clinical assessment and reporting of cognitive impairment resulting from developmental disorders, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain-disease. Selected topics include perception, speech, memory/dementia, judgment, and attention. Prerequisite: Graduate status and PSYC 961 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Brain-behavior relationships in humans; structure and function of the brain; evaluation of function; the interpretation of neuropsychological data. Lecture and laboratory. LEC
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Lecture and fieldwork. Advanced clinical interviewing. Structured diagnostic interviewing. Coverage of specialized areas of clinical interviewing (e.g., motivational interviewing). Report writing focused on documentation of clinical and structured interviewing. Prerequisite: PSYC 855 or consent of instructor. FLD
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A lecture/discussion course in cognitive development. The course will contrast the theory and research of Jean Piaget and his followers, with an information processing or cognitive psychology approach to issues. Topics include development of perception, attention and information getting; memory and metamemory; problem solving; discrimination learning and concept formation; and individual differences in cognitive styles and strategies. Prerequisite: A course in child psychology or development, a course in cognitive psychology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Coverage of the basic literatures on perceptual-cognitive behavior during the first three years of life, as assessed by measures of attention, perception, learning, and memory. Course material is approached from an information-processing framework. LEC
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Lecture and fieldwork on selection, administration, scoring and interpretation and integration of data from personality and abilities tests. Focus on assessments includes history, theory and application in psychological assessment batteries. Emphasis on advanced training in objective personality assessment, projective personality assessment, psychometric theory and integrated report writing. Prerequisite: PSYC 855 or consent of instructor. FLD
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This course covers nonparametric statistical methods for testing hypotheses when the assumptions of ordinary parametric statistics are not met. Topics include a review of parametric statistics, sampling distributions, the logic of hypothesis testing, and motivations for using nonparametric techniques. In-depth coverage will be given to distribution-free procedures, sign tests, contingency tables, median tests, chi-square and other goodness-of-fit tests, rank correlations, randomness tests, Monte Carlo methods, resampling methods, tests of independence, 1-sample, 2-sample, and k-sample methods, permutation tests, and function smoothing and splines. There will be an emphasis on the theory underlying nonparametric methods. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is an open forum discussion of issues, topics, and presentations in quantitative behavioral and social sciences. The course can be repeated for credit and is open to any graduate student in any discipline across the behavioral and social sciences. SEM
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Conceptual and technical methods for analysis of behavioral environments; theory and research utilization of behavior settings and other ecobehavioral units. Prerequisite: Nine hours of social science including at least one course dealing with research methods and consent of instructor. LEC
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Review of contemporary research of prosocial behavior. Topics to be covered include the existence of altruism, why people do and do not help others, and the effect of institutional roles on the behavior of service professionals such as therapists, counselors, and social workers. LEC
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This course covers the basic concepts and methods of item response models. Focal topics include the theory underlying IRT models and their general properties. Also covered are methods for checking model assumptions and interpreting IRT estimates. The course uses examples from the social and behavioral sciences to demonstrate how IRT methods can be used to inform and refine survey development, to assess measurement equivalence, link survey scores, and build item banks for short forms or computer-adaptive testing (CAT). Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course covers the theory behind, and application of, exploratory factor analysis. Topics include a review of multiple linear regression and matrix algebra. In-depth coverage is devoted to diagrams, model specification, goodness of fit, model selection, parameter estimation, rotation methods, scale development, and sample size and power issues. Extensions to confirmatory settings are elaborated. Both the theory underlying factor analytic techniques and hands-on application using software are emphasized. Applications across the social and behavioral sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Review of individual differences pertaining to culture, ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc., as these have an impact upon theory, research, assessment, and treatment issues in clinical psychology. (Same as ABSC 888.) Prerequisite: Graduate status in clinical psychology, or instructor permission. LEC
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This course concerns the nature of intelligence. Theory and research on cognitive abilities, reasoning, and complex problem solving are surveyed. Special emphasis is given to contemporary cognitive ability research that applies both experimental and correlation methods to understand the nature of intelligence. LEC
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This course takes a unified approach (from classical and modern test theory) to the topic of measurement in the behavioral and social sciences. Content covered includes the construction and administration of psychological tests (examples include tests of intelligence, achievement, and personality); practice in test construction, administration, and validation; and how to assess the reliability and generalizability of an instrument. Applications across the social and behavior sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the central methods used in the analysis of multivariate data. Includes linear transformations, multivariate analysis of variance, multivariate multiple regression, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, factor analysis, and an introduction to methods for clustering and classification. Applications across the behavior and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Statistical methods for modeling multilevel (hierarchically structured) data. Topics include a review of ordinary least squares regression analysis, random effects ANOVA, intraclass correlation, multilevel regression, testing and probing interactions, maximum likelihood estimation, model assumptions, model evaluation, and the analysis of longitudinal data. There will be a heavy emphasis on the theory underlying multilevel modeling techniques and hands-on application using software. Applications across the social, educational, and behavior sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Multivariate analyses of count data. Error models, statistical inference, loglinear models, logit models, logistic regression. Homogeneity, symmetry, and selected other topics. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to statistical methods for modeling latent variables. Topics include a review latent variables, covariance structures analysis, mean structures analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), structural equation modeling (SEM), multiple group CFA, longitudinal CFA, longitudinal SEM, Hierarchical CFA, and Multi-trait Multi-Method SEM. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Course consists of three hours of lecture and a required one-hour lab session where computing applications are taught. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Supervised research experience completing thesis leading to master's degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as ABSC 897.) RSH
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Discussion of current theoretical, empirical, and applied issues in clinical and clinical health psychology involving students, faculty, guest speakers. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Seminar in experimental psychology to be conducted in rotation by the experimental psychologists on the staff and a monthly visiting experimental psychologist. LEC
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A series of research talks on topics relevant to social and personality psychology featuring different weekly speakers from inside and outside the university. SEM
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Diagnosis and treatment of psychological problems in childhood and adolescence. (Same as ABSC 905.) Preference given to graduate students in child clinical psychology, school psychology, and counseling psychology. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of graduate credit in psychology or consent of instructor. LEC
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A seminar devoted to factors affecting early human development with some attention to theoretical formulations and the relevant animal literature. LEC
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An intensive study of traditional and recent developmental theories with an emphasis upon the role of heredity, early stimulation, reinforcement, and modification as each affects the course of the development of children. LEC
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A detailed study of a specific research area dealing with the biological foundations of behavior. Each week articles will be assigned from the journal literature. LEC
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Consideration of current psychological theory and research on adult intimate relationships: friendship, dating, committed relationships, dissolution of committed relationships. Students will be expected to be involved in on-going empirical research in the area. Prerequisite: Graduate level courses in research design and statistics. LEC
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An examination of the concept of attitude and the methods developed to assess the various aspects of attitudes. Prerequisite: PSYC 578 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Intensive examination of selected problems in the functioning of small groups. May be taken for two semesters. LEC
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Lecture, laboratory, fieldwork, and supervision appointment. Advanced psychological intervention techniques for children, youth, and families; supervised progressive experience in application of behavioral and psycho-therapeutic methods to behavioral and emotional problems. (Same as ABSC 943, formerly HDFL 943.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD
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A continuation of ABSC/HDFL 943 and PSYC 943. (Same as ABSC 944, formerly HDFL 944.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD
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Comparative examination and analysis of major theories and approaches to psychotherapeutic interventions, core principles of therapeutic change, scientific approaches to establishing treatment efficacy, current intervention issues. Prerequisite: Nine hours in graduate clinical psychology or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ABSC/HDFL 944 and PSYC 944. May be taken in more than one semester. (Same as ABSC 947.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical child psychology and instructor permission. FLD
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This course provides an overview of theoretical and applied issues germane to the contemporary empirically supported treatments movement in clinical psychology. The course will include an in-depth examination of several psychotherapy protocols (e.g., cognitive therapy for depression) which have been identified as "empirically supported," with considerable attention accorded to implementation of the characteristic techniques of such interventions. LEC
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Lecture, readings, and discussion of theory and research related to the practices of clinical supervision and consultation. Developmental and competency based approaches to supervision with exposure to other approaches. Professional issues, ethics, and multicultural aspects of supervision and consultation. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 969 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Fieldwork in supervision under direction of instructor. Practice in supervision of clinical work, assessment, psychotherapy, and documentation. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 950 and PSYC 969, or consent of instructor. FLD
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Review of attachment theory literature and the research it has generated in clinical developmental, personality, and social psychology. The course will allow discussion of a wide range of issues including the evolution of behavioral systems that underlie close human relationships, the developmental roots of relational styles and affect-regulation processes, the role of mental representations in interpersonal behavior, and some of the attachment and close relationship processes involved in good and poor mental health. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Acquaint students with the Social Neuroscience approach as well as recent findings using this approach. The course will focus on particular social phenomena and (a) evaluate the utility of current social neuroscience research examining these phenomena and (b) consider future experimental designs using the Social Neuroscience approach to further inform our understanding of each phenomenon. After being acquainted with foundational concepts, students will analyze findings in a number of core content domains (including emotions, emotion regulation, self, stereotyping, attitudes and beliefs, social decision making, cooperation, close relationships), focusing on neuroscience's contribution beyond traditional methods. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Review of current nosology of adult psychopathological syndromes emphasizing development of diagnostic skills. Critical survey of recent research and theory related to the etiology, course, prognosis, and treatment of adult psychopathological conditions. Prerequisite: Graduate student status in clinical psychology, clinical child psychology, or counseling psychology. LEC
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A review of fundamental topics in the neurosciences and their relevance to selected psychopathological disorders. The fundamental topics are taken from genetics, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry. The disorders include schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of selected advanced topics in the area of personality. Includes review of theoretical and research issues in the area of personality. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved clinical psychology field setting; supervision by qualified clinical child psychology faculty and field staff clinicians. Required of all clinical child psychology program students. An intensive guided experience in application of clinical child psychology theory, methods, and practices. Integrates scientific and clinical aspects of field. (Same as ABSC 963, formerly HDFL 963.) Prerequisite: Completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations and permission of clinical child psychology faculty. FLD
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Lecture, laboratory and fieldwork, and supervision appointment. Psychological evaluation and treatment of individuals, couples, families, and groups; supervised, progressive experience in psychological treatment and in the clinical evaluation of intellectual, personality, and social functioning. Emphasis in selection of and training in psychological intervention strategies is on the use of empirically supported treatments where possible. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Graduate student in clinical psychology program. FLD
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A continuation of PSYC 964. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 964 or permission of instructor. FLD
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A continuation of PSYC 964. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 964 or permission of instructor. FLD
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Clinical approaches to marriage and family therapy. Intensive consideration of the theoretical positions, research findings, clinical methods, and technical problems in marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 946. LEC
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Systematic consideration of research methods in clinical psychology including identification of a research problem, selection of the research design and assessment strategies, and methods of evaluating the results. The principles, pitfalls, artifacts, biases, and sources of controversy in research in this area are also covered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology. LEC
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Lecture, laboratory, fieldwork, and supervision appointment. Advanced psychological treatment of the individual, couple, family, and group client; supervised, progressive experience in the clinical application of psychotherapeutic treatment methods with emphasis on the use of empirically supported interventions where possible. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 966 or consent of instructor. FLD
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A continuation of PSYC 969. Grading on Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 969 or consent of instructor. FLD
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Three consecutive enrollments, covering a minimum of eleven months of experience in an approved clinical psychology field setting; supervision by clinical psychology faculty and field staff clinical psychologists. Required of all clinical psychology program students. An intensive guided experience in the application of clinical psychology theory, methods, and practices. An emphasis upon the relationships between scientific and clinical functions. Integrations between research and clinical practice. Prerequisite: Completion of Ph.D. comprehensive examinations and consent of clinical psychology faculty. FLD
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Interprofessional relationships, case security, legal aspects, ethical code of practice, clinic administration, and problems in the clinical practice of psychology. Issues involving ethics in research will also be explored. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Clinical approaches to the therapeutic treatment of children with special emphasis on research findings and laboratory (practicum) experience. A survey of relationship therapies, operant strategies, system approaches, parent education and play therapy by the right therapist for a specific child with a particular problem. (Same as ABSC 976.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD
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Lecture; laboratory and fieldwork, and supervision appointment. Specialized psychological services for the evaluation and/or treatment of the individual client or the group or the institution. Investigation of and experience in a special practicum area not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Students must consult with members of the clinical faculty and propose an acceptable project in advance of enrollment. FLD
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Investigation of a special research problem or directed reading in an area not covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Discussion of the problems and techniques of teaching psychology at the undergraduate level. A minimum of one credit of this course must be taken by all assistant instructors during the two semesters of the first year of their appointment in the department. Only three hours may count toward the Ph.D. degree. LEC
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Lectures and discussion on issues in the conduct of a scientific career, with emphasis on practical topics of special importance in behavioral science. Topics will include the academic and scientific roles of behavioral scientists, establishing a research lab, communicating research findings, tenure processes, gender equity, ethical conduct, and good scientific citizenship. Discussions will highlight important case studies. (Same as SPLH 982.) LEC
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Inferential problems in experimental psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and PSYC 791 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Statistical methods for identifying classes, clusters, and taxa. Topics include k-means, discriminant analysis, hierarchical clustering algorithms, additive trees, neural network models for clustering, latent class models, finite mixture models, and models for skills/cognitive diagnosis. Applications across the social and behavior sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 790 and PSYC 791 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Reviews and contrasts various statistical methods for the analysis of change. Course focuses on various techniques to analyze longitudinal (repeated-measures) data beyond the repeated-measures ANOVA framework. Techniques covered included latent change scores, latent difference scores, individual-differences modeling of latent residual and change scores, intra-individual differences modeling (e.g., growth curve, mixed modeling) and growth mixture modeling. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 896 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of PSYC 896. Advanced applications of modern methods for testing hypotheses on multivariate correlational data in the behavioral and social sciences. Topics include advanced confirmatory factor analysis, mediation and moderation among latent variables, latent growth curve modeling, and other latent variable mean and covariance structures analysis techniques. Applications across the behavioral and social sciences are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSYC 896 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Research experience making original contribution to literature in clinical child psychology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as ABSC 998, formerly HDFL 998.) THE
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Instruct students in developmental steps used in translating a basic science experiment with clinical applications into a proof of concept application and human trial. Multidisciplinary approach; lectures from faculty in Pharmacology, KU Cancer Ctr, KUMCRI. Curriculum: Levels of evidence-clinical impact, Pre-Clinical modeling, In-Vitro studies & Animal models, Cancer Drug Development-pharmacokinetics & toxicity, Pre-Clinical Proof of Concept & FDA, Creating a Pilot Study, Biostatistics 101, Phases of Clinical Trials, Data Collection, Support Staff, Regulatory and DSMBs, IRB and HIPPA, Funding Study: Grants & Parma, Advertising study & meeting accrual goals, Goals of Phase I study, Goals & Objectives of Phase II Efficacy study, Phase 3 Multicenter Study: Value of Numbers & Utilizing Cooperative Groups. Prerequisite: Completion of first 2 years of Med School or graduate school, or enrollment in MD/PhD program. Students no meeting one of these criteria will require permission from course instructor. LEC
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Molecular foundations of chemical action, including structure of chemicals, kinetics and consequences of chemical-receptor interactions, and methods for characterizing receptors, and receptor-mediated events. Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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Introductory pathology course for graduate students preparing for a career in basic toxicology research. Topics to be presented and discussed include: cell injury, inflammation, repair and regeneration, immunopathology, neoplasia, tumor pathology, respiratory pathology, liver pathology, neuropathology, miscellaneous organ pathology, and lab animal clinical chemistry. LEC
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Introductory pathology course for planning on being research toxicologists. Topics to be presented and discussed: cell injury, inflammation, repair and regeneration, immunopath, neoplasia, tumor pathology, respiratory pathology, liver pathology, neuropathology, miscellaneous organ pathology, and lab animal clinical chemistry. LEC
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Chemical fundamentals in structure, actions and metabolism of toxicants and drugs. Included are molecular features of toxicants and drugs, stereoisomerism, receptor theory, dose-response relationships, agonists and antagonists, absorption, pharmacokinetics, and structure-activity relationships. LEC
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For students in a master's program in toxicology. THE
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Principles of absorption, biotransformation, and excretion of xenobiotics. Prerequisite: PHCL 888 or departmental permission. LEC
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Selected topics in environmental, forensic, and industrial toxicology. LEC
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Detailed discussion of the pharmacokinetics of chemicals and drugs; discussion of the p-450 system, its influence on the biological half-life and toxicity of xenobiotics. Prerequisite: PTOX 917 or departmental permission. LEC
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Individualized discussions dealing with the toxicity of xenobiotics. Subjects to be discussed are the mechanisms of toxic action of pesticides, solvents, metals, radiation, gases, and plant and animal toxins. Prerequisite: PTOX 918 or departmental permission. LEC
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Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis. Genetics. Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis. Initiation and promotion. Tumor immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Angiogenesis. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PATH 939 and PHCL 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC
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A unique course where students are exposed to and have practical experience in techniques used for risk-assessment of chemicals. The course is taught with extensive input by industrial toxicologists who use these techniques on a daily basis. This course is offered at a local industrial setting. Prerequisite: PHCL 888; PTOX 917, PTOX 918, and PTOX 938, or departmental permission. LEC
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Prerequisite: PTOX 889. RSH
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Prerequisite: Open to students of advanced standing enrolled in the doctoral program in toxicology. THE
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Introduces the student to the physical therapy profession and professional role expectations. The history of physical therapy as it relates to the professionalization process, including ethical and legal obligations, as well as student responsibilities. It also addresses the development of effective communication and interpersonal skills and appreciation for individual and cultural differences within clinical settings. Professional responsibilities in physical therapy are introduced, including codes of ethical conduct and awareness of appropriate professional behaviors directed by organizational and legislative regulations. The development of medical terminology recall and recognition skills is also covered in the course. Prerequisite: Admission into the DPT program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Emphasizes the development of effective documentation skills, including exposure to a variety of documentation formats and implications for proper reimbursement. Disablement classification models, behavioral objectives, and functional outcome concepts are applied to organize patient data and identify treatment goals. With an emphasis on physical therapy practice, delivery of health care, various team structures used in providing health care, and the roles of the physical therapist assistant are provided. This course includes multiple homework assignments to develop both hand-written and electronic documentation skills in the student. Prerequisite: Successful completion of semester 1 of the DPT curriculum or permission of instructor. LEC
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Students will be introduced to some of the tests and measures that physical therapists use as a means to gather information about the patient/client. The tests and measures covered include: vital signs, goniometry, manual muscle testing, sensory testing, reflex testing and palpation of surface anatomy. Learning opportunities include: lecture, laboratory, demonstration and patient interaction. Prerequisite: Admission into the DPT program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Skills required by the physical therapist in the generalist acute care environment. A series of patient care related lectures, demonstrations, videotapes and laboratories are integrated to teach proper body mechanics, infection control and sterile technique, basic assessment, transfers, positioning, tubes, ostomies, clinic safety procedures, tilt table usage, prescribing a proper wheel chair, applying proper therapeutic range of motion exercises, and using appropriate assistive devices for gait and transfers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of semester 1 of the DPT curriculum or permission of instructor. LEC
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Students will apply the skills obtained in Physical Therapy Test and Measures, Physical Therapy Documentation, Physical Therapy Interventions I and begin clinical problem-solving using common physical therapy treatment interventions. Topics include integumentary management for wound healing interventions, therapeutic modalities with an emphasis on the healing process and electrical modalities. Learning opportunities include lecture, laboratory, demonstration and patient interaction. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first 2 semesters of the DPT curriculum or permission of the instructor. LEC
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The student will obtain a basic understanding of human gross anatomy with specific knowledge of upper and lower extremities, head and neck, and back. At the end of this course the student will be able to apply this knowledge of anatomy to functional and clinical situations. Prerequisite: Admission into the DPT program, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course involves a study of joint structure, joint function, and the biomechanical principles underlying the kinetics and kinematics of human motion, including normal gait and selected pathological gait patterns. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between biomechanical and physiological factors in musculoskeletal and neuromuscular function, and the application of kinesiological principles to clinical physical therapy situations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of semester 1 of DPT curriculum, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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