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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An honors section of ANTH 110 for students with superior academic records. LEC
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An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 360. LEC
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Violent change, revolution, planned change, and peaceful transition in non-Western cultures. A study of development, modernization, nation-building, rapid acculturation, and war. LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 160 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 160 or ANTH 360. LEC
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A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy which are better known to the Western world. (Same as EALC 130.) LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 100. Not open to students who have had ANTH 100. LEC
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An exploration of the human ways through films. Cross-cultural interpretations by filmed records of varieties of interpersonal relations seen through such aspects of culture as hunting, war, marriage, religion, sex, kinship, and death. Patterns of interactions are analyzed by examples from cultures around the world, primarily the non-Western world. LEC
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This course familiarizes students with the peoples and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East. It examines the cultural, demographic, and religious diversity of the region, as well as the development of the early Islamic community and the formation of Islamic institutions. Issues such as religion and politics, inter-religious relations, nation-building, Islamic response to colonialism, Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Islamic resurgence, secularism, democratization, and gender, are also explored. (Same as AAAS 303.) LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 104. Not open to students who have had ANTH 104 or ANTH 105. LEC
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An introduction to the nature of culture, language, society, and personality. Included in this survey are some of the major principles, concerns, themes of cultural anthropology, and the variety of ways in which people structure their social, economic, political, and personal lives. Emphasized are the implications of overpopulation, procreative strategies, progress and growth of culture complexity, developments in the Third World, and cultural dynamics in Western as well as in non-Western societies. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 108 or ANTH 109. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 110. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 110 or ANTH 111. LEC
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Recent discoveries in anthropological archaeology in various areas of the world and their impact on existing bodies of fact and theory, and on established methods of archaeological discovery. LEC
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A survey of prehistoric art focusing on the material record and interpretations of rock art (paintings, engravings on rock surfaces in rock-shelters, caves and in open air sites) and portable art created by prehistoric people. The emphasis is on the small-scale societies (hunter-gatherer and early food producers) around the world before the appearance of written records in respective geographic areas. Environmental, social and cultural contexts in which these art forms were created are discussed along with a review of past scholarship and current interpretive approaches to this old and enduring expression of human creativity. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. (Same as HA 315.) LEC
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A survey of one million years of prehistory from the peopling of the European continent to the Roman Empire. The course will focus on the growth of culture, considering economy and technology, art and architecture. Topics will include the Neanderthals, the big game hunters of the Ice Age, the megalith builders, the Celts. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, history, or cultural geography. LEC
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A survey of the changing lifeways of Native Americans in Kansas from the time of the earliest inhabitants of at least 12,000 years ago to the period of Euro-American contact. Extensive use will be made of Museum of Anthropology collections. LEC
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Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as LING 320.) LEC
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An honors section of ANTH 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as LING 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of biochemical and physical variability in contemporary human populations. Topics include: genetic basis of human diversity, evolutionary theory, population genetics, blood groups, biochemical variations, body size and shape, pigmentation, and other morphological characteristics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The evolutionary processes and events leading to the development of humans and the humanlike forms from primate ancestors; fossil hominids and the origin of modern Homo Sapiens. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey and examination of present-day human populations focusing upon adaptations in different environments and the interaction of culture and biology. General evolutionary theory is treated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of evolutionary change. Genetic, physiological, and cultural adaptations to environmental stress are discussed from the standpoint of their past evolutionary significance and their influence on contemporary human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 304. LEC
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The pros and cons of conflicting theories on the past and present evolution are examined. Race and intelligence, evolution of skin color, and genetic future of humans are among the considered topics. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course is an introduction to the evolutionary study of human sexual behavior. Using an explicitly Darwinian framework, it examines the biological basis for human mate selection, male and female mating strategies, child-birth and child-care practices, parental care, marriage, and family structure. The power of Darwinian theory to predict human sexual behavior is tested in anthropological field studies, designed and carried out by students in the class. Class time is allocated for discussion of students' research as it progresses through each stage, and results are presented in the last weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: Introductory class in biology or biological anthropology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An evolutionary perspective on the behavior and biology of males and females in human society. Topics will include the evolution of sexual dimorphism, social and biological issues in human reproduction, primate social patterns, human sexual behavior and taboos, sex and social structure, and the sociobiology of sex. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of ANTH 160. An introduction to basic concepts and themes in cultural anthropology by means of the comparative study of selected cultures from around the world, for the purpose of appreciating cultural diversity. Emphasis is on systems of belief and meaning. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 160. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 161. Not open to students who have had ANTH 161. LEC
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An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Emphasis on cultural-historical relationships and theories of cultural development and change. LEC
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This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as EALC 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC
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An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as EALC 364.) LEC
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Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as EALC 365.) LEC
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A study of the Japanese people from birth to death: what it means to be born in a Japanese family, to grow up Japanese, and to die Japanese. Anthropological works and selections from Japanese literature and film will be used to examine ways in which Japanese people live through the critical periods in their life cycle. (Same as EALC 366.) LEC
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An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of China. Emphasis on historical development, social structure, cultural continuity and change, and ethics. (Same as EALC 368.) LEC
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A survey of the native cultures of Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Investigation of the origins and dispersal of Pacific peoples, their cultural adaptations to differing habitats, their forms of social, political, and religious organization. Consideration of the problems and cultural changes resulting from colonization and modernization. Prerequisite: ANTH 100, ANTH 108, ANTH 160, ANTH 308, ANTH 360, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course examines theories of religion, discourse, power, gender and sexuality in their application to Arab societies. The course introduces different aspects of Arab cultures. Through canonical works, we study political domination, tribal social organization, honor, tribe, shame, social loyalty, ritual initiations and discuss how these issues speak generally to anthropological inquiry. Regionally specific works are then framed by an additional set of readings drawn from anthropological, linguistics, and social theories. (Same as AAAS 372.) LEC
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A survey of American Indian cultures north of Mexico at the time of the first contact with Western civilization; detailed studies of selected Indian cultures. LEC
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A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as LAA 334.) LEC
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A survey of native peoples and cultures of South America from the time of initial Western contacts to the present day. LEC
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An analysis of the cultural origin, diversity, and unity of the peoples of the neotropics. Emphasizing the peoples of Amazonia, the course introduces students to topics associated with the economic, political, and cultural dimensions of social life in rain forest communities. LEC
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This course examines gender roles and gender culture in Costa Rica, especially in the southern part of the country. Students will be introduced, both theoretically and practically, to feminist anthropology as well as gender ethnography. It covers academic literature about the topic, and literature written by women. The class will also discuss different types of machismo culture and the structures and functioning of families in southern Costa Rica. Class taught in Golfito, Costa Rica. Course taught in Spanish. Contact the Department of Anthropology, or the Office of Study Abroad. LEC
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This course will introduce students to cultural constructions and performances of masculinity, femininity, and alternative genders across time and space. Topics and cases will be drawn from primarily non-Western cultures, ranging from Javanese markets to Pacific Rim gardens, and from Haitian voudou to Maya royal politics. This course uses research by archeologists, linguists, anthropologists, and sociocultural anthropologists. (Same as WGSS 389.) LEC
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An introduction to the historical background, practice, and ethical issues involved in the creation, presentation, and dissemination of anthropological information in a museum setting. Students participate in the study of a collection of material culture (artifacts) from the Museum of Anthropology, culminating in development of a script for an exhibit. FLD
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Selected issues and theories in contemporary anthropology (cultural, linguistic, biological, archaeological) for honors students. Topic for semester to be announced. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite: Admission to the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of basic laboratory procedures associated with specimen preparation, analysis, classification, and measurement of archaeological materials, with emphasis on lithic and ceramic technology. Formal lectures and laboratory sections. LEC
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A more intensive treatment of the content of ANTH 210. Not open to students who have had ANTH 210. LEC
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A study of evolutionary processes leading to the birth of the early great urban civilizations of the Old World and the New World. Patterns of growth and similarities and differences in the rise of urban complexes and states in Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, and in Mexico/Guatemala and Peru. LEC
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Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD
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Undergraduate and graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological fieldwork, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD
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The study of language as a symbolic system. Exploration into the interrelatedness of linguistic systems, of nonlinguistic communicative systems, and of other cultural systems. (Same as LING 430.) LEC
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A review of the evolution and behavior of nonhuman primates. The survey includes the stages of primate evolution, morphology of living primates, and descriptions and analyses of primate behavioral patterns. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Principles of human genetics involved in biological anthropology. The genetics of non-Western populations considered within an evolutionary framework. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine hours of credit. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as BIOL 432, PSYC 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC
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Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as BIOL 449, SPLH 449, and PSYC 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD
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The role of disease in human evolution, variation, and adaptation is examined. Topics include paleopathology, epidemics, and genetic/cultural adaptation to certain diseases. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A critical examination of the main theories and concepts in cultural anthropology. Consideration of the philosophical presuppositions underlying past and current theoretical issues and trends. LEC
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An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. LEC
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Study of the killing of peoples and cultures. Case studies, focusing primarily on tribal South America. Examination of the implications of these studies as regards our definition of culture and our evaluation of aid programs, missionary efforts, and international business expansion. LEC
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Applications of anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of community and national development, public health, international aid, and military assistance. Examination of the role of the anthropologist, of ethics and values in intervention schemes, and of the organization of planned change in applied programs. Intensive analysis of selected case studies. FLD
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The impact of scientific and technological advances on social and personal life in contemporary society. A wide range of topics will be dealt with during the semester; examples include the internet and new modes of communication, developments in genetics and medicine, and testing for intelligence, drugs, lie detection, and other purposes. LEC
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Introduction to the interrelationship of individual and society: processes of socialization, perception and cognition, personality and culture, with emphasis on the psychological interpretation of human behavior and the sociocultural contexts of psychological processes. Both ethnographic and cross-culturally comparative perspectives are introduced. LEC
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A comparative study of religion and systems of value and belief in non-Western cultures. LEC
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Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Maximum of three credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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Individual research under the direction of one or more instructors in the department. Maximum of four credit hours in any one semester. Prerequisite: A grade-point average of 3.5 in anthropology and 3.0 in all courses, and consent of instructor. IND
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Seminar concentrating on selected problems and issues in contemporary archaeology. Topic for semester to be announced. Course may be repeated for a maximum of nine hours of credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a course in archaeology at any level, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary sociocultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary anthropological linguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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Course concentrating on selected problems, theories, and issues in contemporary biological anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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A general survey of the archaeology of North America. Detailed coverage of selected problems. LEC
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A survey of the archaeological record of eastern North America from the late Pleistocene to the time of European contact. The diverse environments of eastern North America are considered in conjunction with the dynamic climatic and ecological changes which have occurred during the past 20,000 years to provide a background for study of the prehistoric groups who occupied the region. Topics will include the change in economies, technologies, and organization from the earliest hunter-gatherers through the development of pre-Colombian complex societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
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An archaeological survey of the Precolombian heritage of Mexico and Central America. The sites and cultures of the Olmecs, Teotihuacan, the Maya, the Zapotecs, the Toltecs, and the Aztecs will be considered in detail. Investigations of ancient art and architecture, crafts and technologies, trade and exchange, religious beliefs and practices, and writing and calendrical systems will be directed toward understanding the growth and the decline of these Native American civilizations. LEC
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An intensive examination of current scholarship on the ancient Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. The course will consider Maya culture from its roots in early villages of the Preclassic period to the warring city-states of the Postclassic period. Topics will include settlement and subsistence systems, sociopolitical evolution, art and architecture, myth and symbolism, and Maya hieroglyphic writing. An important theme of the course will be the relevance of the Precolumbian Maya for understanding complex societies and contemporary Latin American Culture. Prerequisite: Successful completion of one of the following: ANTH 110, ANTH 310, ANTH 415, ANTH 506, or ANTH 508. LEC
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An archaeological survey of the ancient peoples of Peru and neighboring countries in South America. The origins of complex societies on the coast and in the Andean highlands will be reviewed with special consideration of the role of "vertical" environments in the development of Andean social and economic systems. Cultures such as Chavin, Moche, Nazca, Huari, Tiahuanaco, Chimu, and the rise of the imperial Inca state will be examined through artifacts, architectural remains, and ethnohistoric documents. LEC
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Consideration of the history and processes of cultural development from the evidence of humans' first presence to the historic period in the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Special attention will be devoted to the origins, changes within, and connections to modern Southwestern native peoples of three long-lived traditions known as Hohokam, Mogollon, and Anasazi. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
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A critical evaluation of the records (local traditions, written documents, maps, photographs, etc.) relevant to a reconstruction of the history of cultures. Topic for the semester to be announced. LEC
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A broad examination of the prehistory of the Near East, emphasizing selected regional and research themes. Discussion will include a consideration of cultural adaptation and environmental diversity, early history of archaeological work, and current research trends. While all cultural periods will be examined, a major emphasis will be on the origins of food production and Neolithic economies. LEC
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Topic for the semester to be announced. An introductory course in archaeology recommended. LEC
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The diversity of hunter-gatherer cultures documented in the ethnographic and archaeological records is considered on a global scale, with particular attention given to the relationships between environment, technology, and organization. The evolution of hunter-gatherers from the earliest hominids until their interaction with more complex societies is considered, with emphasis given to the variation and nature of change in these societies. Prerequisite: ANTH 108 or ANTH 110, or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310. LEC
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Application of the concepts and methods of the geosciences to interpretation of the archeological record. The course will focus primarily on the field aspects of geoarchaeology (e.g., stratigraphy, site formational processes, and landscape reconstruction), and to a lesser extent on the array of laboratory approaches available. (Same as GEOG 532.) Prerequisite: GEOG 104, ANTH 110, or ANTH 310. LEC
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An investigation of the relationships between the biophysical world and the development of human cultures. Examination of archaeological methods employed in the study of these relationships. LEC
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An introduction to the analysis and interpretation of prehistoric stone industries. Topics discussed include origins and development of lithic technology, principles of description and typology, use and function of stone tools; interpretation of flint knapping. Prerequisite: An introductory course in archaeology. LEC
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Practicum in the method and theory of pottery analysis in archaeology. Topics include manufacturing techniques, classification, and compositional analysis of pottery artifacts, as well as strategies for interpreting the role of ceramic vessels in food production, storage, and consumption; social and ritual activities; trade and exchange; and the communication of ideas. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
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This course is intended to complement faunal identification with practical involvement in analyses and interpretation of archaeological faunal assemblages using a variety of modern methods. Students will participate in the study of specific archaeological faunal remains, development of comparative zooarchaeological collections, and in middle-range research to document the variety of agents that affect faunal remains. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
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This course discusses the relationship between past human groups and their plant environment, including the use of plants for food, fuel, shelter, and household articles. Topics include a review of the development of paleoethnobotanical research, methods and techniques of data recovery, basics in plant identification, methods of data quantification and interpretation, and current research topics. In addition to selected readings, students will participate with the development of comparative botanical collections and the interpretation of botanical remains recovered from archaeological contexts. Prerequisite: ANTH 110 or ANTH 310. LEC
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A survey is provided of the archaeological record and its interpretations for the Great Plains area of North America. The records from earliest human occupation, variation in hunter and gatherer societies, to horticultural and farming societies, and the historic period are reviewed. The history of archaeological research in the region, explanatory frameworks and models, and discussion of changes in economy, technology, mobility, social organization, and population movements are among the topics of concern. LEC
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This course will survey demographic topics that are relevant to anthropological research and theory. Topics will include family and household structure, fertility, nuptiality, mortality, migration, and paleodemography. Emphasis will be placed on methods in use in these areas and applications from the literature. Prerequisite: Three courses in anthropology (at least one in physical and one in cultural) or graduate standing. LEC
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Lecture and discussion. A comprehensive introduction to human nutrition, focusing on the anatomical, biochemical, and physiological aspects of nutrition. The essential nutrients and their role in human metabolism are covered in detail, and the course's systemic approach places a strong emphasis on integration of metabolism. Students also are introduced to human dietary evolution, the concept of nutritional adaptation, and cross-cultural differences in diet and nutritional physiology. Discussion sections focus on applied aspects of human nutrition, including dietary assessment. The course is a prerequisite for ANTH 543, which is recommended as the second course in a sequence on human nutrition. Prerequisite: ANTH 104 or ANTH 304, and BIOL 152. Students who have not had BIOL 152 should have taken a comparable introductory course in organismal physiology. LEC
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The first half of the course focuses on nutrition through the life cycle, with an emphasis on biological, cultural, and environmental factors that influence human dietary intake and nutrition across the life span. Particular attention is given to the role of nutrition in cross-cultural variation in human growth, development, and aging. The second half of the course examines evolutionary aspects of human nutrition, including the origins and adaptive significance of regional and cultural basis. The development of taste and food preferences, at the level of the individual and population, as well as symbolic aspects of dietary behavior also will be considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 542 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the genetic, linguistic, historic, archaeological, and morphological evidence for the origins of indigenous populations of the Americas. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course examines health and nutrition in African communities, using the methods of biological and medical anthropology. Fundamental to the approach taken in the course is the understanding that the health of human groups depends on interactions between biological and cultural phenomena in a particular ecological context. One topic will be selected per semester, to examine in detail the full array of epidemiological factors contributing to patterns of specific diseases. AIDS, childhood diseases, and reproductive health of African women are among possible topics. Course material will be selected from scholarly and medical publications, as well as coverage in the popular media. The use of a variety of sources will enhance understanding of the biological and cultural issues involved and will help students identify possible bias and misinformation in popular coverage of events such as famine or epidemic in African settings. (Same as AAAS 554.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in either anthropology or African studies. LEC
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This course is an intensive survey of the fossil evidence for hominoid evolution up to the emergence of the first hominids--Australopithecus. Topics include the origin and evolution of the great apes, gibbons, and extinct forms such as Ramapithecus and Gigantopithecus, as well as the appearance of Australopithecines. Functional morphology is stressed. This course may be taken either before or after ANTH 550. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The rise of genus Homo is the theme of this course. Fossils representing erectus, Neanderthal, Upper Paleolithic, and post-Pleistocene forms are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the relationship between cultural and morphological change. The course is a continuation of ANTH 549, but may be taken out of sequence. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course uses ethnographic case materials to explore the ways humans provision themselves under different social and environmental conditions. It introduces the basic theories, concepts, and debates of economic anthropology and provides a foundation for more advanced courses in this subdiscipline. Prerequisite: ANTH 108/308 or ANTH 160/360, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This class surveys the relations between Mexico and the U.S. as nation-states, and among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Anglo Americans (to a lesser extent other U.S. citizens) in historical perspective. Issues of sovereignty, national and ethnic identity, immigration, migration, labor relations, popular culture, media, and transnational economics are covered. Prerequisite: ANTH 108/308 or ANTH 160/360 or LAA 100. LEC
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Anthropological approaches to racial, ethnic, religious, and localized communities in contemporary U.S. Surveys major theories from social science, considers case studies of immigrant indigenous peoples from historical and contemporary, local, national, and international perspectives, and addresses questions concerning the sources, conditioners, and consequences of in-group and out-group identities. Prerequisite: Introductory cultural anthropology and one cultural course numbered 300 or above, or permission of instructor. LEC
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"Peoples of Africa" examines the anthropology of Sub-Saharan Africa through selected case studies of particular societies and issues that have wider comparative relevance. Normally two to four societies are selected for the semester and studied through ethnographic, historical, and literary monographs. These case studies are examined in their pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial histories. Lectures, readings, and exercises emphasize three kinds of reasoning -- geographical, historical, and cultural context -- required to grasp events and issues in unfamiliar societies. The course also features major anthropological ideas that emerged in the study of African society, and tracks how anthropology has been adapted by African scholars, policy makers, and activists. LEC
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The course examines recurring themes and images in Japanese culture through films, literary works, and anthropological and other social science literature. These themes and images are studied in the contexts of both modern and traditional cultures. Although the popular deviates from the orthodox, nevertheless, the energy and pervasiveness of these bastard offspring enforce and sustain "proper" cultural values. As a result of exploration of both highways and backroads of cultural expression, a holistic picture of Japanese ethos will emerge. (Same as EALC 565.) LEC
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An investigation of deeply rooted Japanese beliefs about intimate relationships among humans, animals, and nature - beliefs which help to explain the mysterious and to lend order to the world. Anthropological works, selections from Japanese literature, historical documents, artworks, and films will be used to examine supernatural themes. (Same as EALC 567.) LEC
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This seminar explores Kongo culture and history through a cross-section of the African-Atlantic World: Western Equatorial Africa and related New World societies in Jamaica, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and the Georgia and Carolina Coasts, and New Orleans (thus in former British, Portuguese, French, Spanish, and U.S. colonial territories). The seminar will assess recent scholarship on patterns of slavery and resistance, cultural and linguistic change, creolization and hybridization. (Same as AAAS 568) . LEC
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Introduces students to the comparative and cross-cultural study of violence. The course begins by surveying different anthropological approaches to the study of violence, with special attention paid to classical social theorists as well as ethnographic works. Topics may include (post) coloniality and identity politics, nationalism, race, religion, and political culture; geographic areas to be covered may include Africa, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and South Asia. LEC
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A cultural and psychological analysis of the sources, dynamics, effects, and practices of modern patterns of violence. Variations in psycho/social reactions to violence will be examined with reference to personal, social, and cross-cultural characteristics. Particular attention will be given to the cultural and individual characteristics of people who successfully survive violence and terrorism targeted at them. Emphasis will be upon the psychological and cultural origins of terrorism and violence in modern societies. Prerequisite: Introductory course in anthropology or psychology. LEC
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