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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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The development and spread of Gothic architecture and sculpture in France, England, Spain, and Germany. Prerequisite: A college level introduction to Medieval art history. LEC
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The religious and secular painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Iberian peninsula during the Visigothic, Asturian, Moorish, Mozarabic, Romanesque, Gothic, and Isabeline periods. The monuments are studied in their relation to general continental developments and as vehicles for the transmission of Islamic artistic ideas to the rest of Europe. Prerequisite: A survey of Medieval art. LEC
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A detailed study of the art of Hals, Rembrandt and Vermeer, on the one hand, and of Rubens and Van Dyck on the other. Prerequisite: A survey of Northern Baroque art or consent of instructor. LEC
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The history of East Asian calligraphy will be examined, including seal script, clerical script, standard script, running script, grass script, and Japanese kana scripts. The styles of outstanding masters of the past will be studied, and students will also be expected to practice these scripts and styles as part of the understanding of technique and calligraphic expression. LEC
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A survey covering the development of Japanese painting from the Kofun period down to the early twentieth century. Topics will include Buddhist and other religious paintings, narrative handscrolls, suibokuga, decorative screens, genre paintings and ukiyo-e prints, and Western-style paintings of the Meiji and Taisho periods. Work requirements will be greater for students enrolled at the 700 level. Prerequisite: HA 265, or HA 267, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of painting in Japan during the Edo Period (1615-1868), arranged by the many schools and styles of painting that were brought to a height during this era. Ink painting, Zen painting, decorative painting, naturalistic painting, literati painting, and court painting will be included. Prerequisite: A course in Japanese painting or consent of instructor. LEC
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A thorough study of the works attributed to the great masters of the Five Dynasties, Sung and Yuan Dynasties (10th to14th centuries) in China, in relation to the various theories of Chinese painting and the problems of connoisseurship. Prerequisite: A survey of Asian or Chinese art. LEC
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A thorough study of the major artists and schools of Ming and Qing painting (14th to 20th centuries) in relation to the aesthetic theories of the period and to its main stylistic trends. Prerequisite: A survey of Asian or Chinese art. LEC
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A survey of the development of painting in China, beginning with the earliest forms of figural and landscape depiction. Emphasis will be placed on the major painting traditions of the Sung, Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties. Prerequisite: A survey of Asian art or consent of instructor. LEC
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Critical analysis of readings on selected topics in Japanese art. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Critical analysis of readings on selected topics in Chinese art. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or more artists, techniques, or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: A course in graphic art, or in a discipline related to the field of the seminar. LEC
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This seminar will focus on different selected topics on the Arts and Crafts Movement. These could include the movement in relation to Medievalism, Orientalism, and other revival styles; issues of social and economic policy in various countries; new ideas in design theory in relation to the Industrial Revolution; or investigations of individual artists or groups. LEC
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The analysis of the work of a specific artist, medium, or period, and developing a knowledge of the methods and means of establishing standards of quality and authorship. Includes study in Spencer and Nelson Museums. Prerequisite: Nine hours of art history and a reading knowledge of a pertinent foreign language. LEC
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The analysis of the work of a specific artist, medium or period, and developing a knowledge of the methods and means of establishing standards of quality and authorship. Includes study in Spencer and/or Nelson Museums. Prerequisite: Nine hours of art history and a reading knowledge of a pertinent foreign language. LEC
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A concentrated study of a special topic which may relate to the art of several countries or several centuries of Europe. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of nine credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of selected problems dealing with Buddhist art in Asia. Different topics are offered in different seminars. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of twelve hours. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Chinese or Japanese and consent of instructor. LEC
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Special study of one or more schools of painting of the Edo period (1615-1868) in Japan. Individual works will be analyzed in depth. Prerequisite: A course in Japanese painting. LEC
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A study of works of painting and calligraphy by Zen monks of China and Japan. There will be an emphasis upon Chinese works of the Sung dynasty and Japanese works from the Kamakura era to the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Courses in Chinese and Japanese painting. LEC
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A study in depth of Japanese Nanga masters of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced study of photographic images as made and used in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Requires primary research. Prerequisites include study of nineteenth century history of art. Specific topics vary. LEC
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This seminar is given each spring by the Murphy Lecturer of the year and includes two weeks of intensive study with a nationally known expert in a special field of art history. The other weeks of seminar meetings for the semester are conducted by the faculty member most closely specialized in this field. Prerequisite: Consent of supervising faculty member. LEC
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Seminar dealing with particular art historical problems of a special and specific nature. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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Supervised study and research into special fields of art of particular interest to the student. Weekly consultation and reports. Prerequisite: Nine hours of art history and a reading knowledge of a pertinent foreign language. RSH
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Primarily for the graduate student interested in art museum work. The student will engage in specialized research related to museum activities resulting in either a research paper, an exhibition, or a catalogue of some portion of the museum's holdings. Prerequisite: Nine hours of history of art and a reading knowledge of a pertinent foreign language. LEC
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A study of selected problems dealing with the art of the early Middle Ages. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A study of selected problems dealing with the art of the later Middle Ages. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced study of the relationships between photographic images, prints, painting, mass media, illustration, and other forms of visual expression. Specific periods and areas of emphasis will vary. Prerequisite: Advanced study of nineteenth century history of art. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of artists, monuments or movements in Later Chinese art. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 16 credit hours. LEC
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A concentrated study of one or two artists, monuments or movements. Different topics are offered in different semesters. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. LEC
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Beginning course in the vernacular language of Haiti, Martinique, Guadeloupe and other areas of the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean. Conversational approach, with essentials of grammar. Reading of basic texts. Special attention to folk culture as expressed by language. No previous knowledge of another foreign language is required. LEC
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Continuation of HAIT 110, with further readings in Haitian literature. Prerequisite: HAIT 110 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continued practice in conversation and composition; intensive and extensive readings from contemporary press, short story, poetry, and folk tales. Prerequisite: HAIT 120 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of HAIT 230, with additional readings from theatre, novel, and historical texts. Prerequisite: HAIT 230 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Detailed analysis of recent Haitian history. The focus will include interactions between religion, social structure, politics, economics and international relations. (Same as AAAS 302.) Prerequisite: AAAS 301/HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Course objective is a sophisticated command of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Haitian. Texts include newspapers and other Haitian publications as well as spoken material produced essentially for native speakers. Conversation and oral presentations. Keeping of personal journal in Haitian. LEC
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Continuation of HAIT 350, plus advanced readings from Haitian authors such as Carrie Paultre, Frank Etienne, Lyonel Desmarattes, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot. LEC
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May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Material not covered by course work, and/or in field of student's special interest. Conferences. Course taken for one hour of credit may not be used to fulfill College's humanities distribution requirement. Prerequisite: Six hours of Haitian Creole and consent of instructor. IND
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Advanced work in either language or literature or both. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. Prerequisite: Four semesters of Haitian Creole or equivalent and consent of instructor. IND
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Advanced work in Haitian culture. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Conferences. As a three-credit-hour course, it may count toward a major in African and African-American studies. No knowledge of Haitian or French is required. Prerequisite: AAAS 301 or HAIT 200, or consent of instructor. IND
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Supervised individual readings in selected areas of Haitian language, literature, and culture. Individual reports and conferences. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Studio performance of solo, ensemble, and orchestral audition repertoire for students concurrently enrolled in violin (viola, etc.) study. For freshman and sophomores (120); juniors and seniors (320); graduate student (720) (as appropriate). May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Studio performance of solo, ensemble, and orchestral audition repertoire for students concurrently enrolled in violin (viola, etc.) study. For freshman and sophomores (120); juniors and seniors (320); graduate student (720) (as appropriate). May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in harp. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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Studio performance of solo, ensemble, and orchestral audition repertoire for students concurrently enrolled in violin (viola, etc.) study. For freshman and sophomores (120); juniors and seniors (320); graduate student (720) (as appropriate). May be repeated for credit. LEC
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For graduate students majoring in harp. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Hausa. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. A continuation of HAUS 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: HAUS 110. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Hausa texts and discussion in Hausa. Prerequisite: HAUS 120. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Hausa. Continuation of HAUS 210. Discussion in Hausa of texts studied. Prerequisite: HAUS 210. LEC
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A practical Hausa language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Hausa. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Hausa study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: HAUS 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of HAUS 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of HAUS 310 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentation, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of HAUS 401. LEC
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A beginning course in modern Israeli Hebrew. Essentials of grammar, syntax and conversational practice; elementary reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. LEC
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A continuation of HEBR 110. Note Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 110. LEC
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Further development of language skills: listening comprehension, oral efficiency, intermediate grammar and syntax, reading and writing. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 120. LEC
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A continuation of HEBR 210. Note: Students with other previous experience in Hebrew must take a placement exam. Prerequisite: HEBR 210. LEC
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This course introduces students to the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew. It includes basic biblical passages for students to translate into English and analyze. LEC
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This is a continuation of Hebrew 230. It continues the study of the grammatical structure and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew, and includes biblical texts for students to translate and analyze. Prerequisite: HEBR 230 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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An introduction to Hebrew literature from the nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. The emphasis is on the development of basic interpretive skills, as well as an understanding of basic literary movements, genres, and concepts of this period. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220 or equivalent. LEC
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A course designed to improve oral, audio and writing proficiencies in Modern Hebrew through reading and discussion of poems, Israeli newspaper articles and other selected materials. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 220, with a grade of "B" or better recommended, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Continued study in Modern Hebrew via poems, short stories, Israeli newspaper articles and electronic media. The course is designed to strengthen linguistic skills, enrich vocabulary and further the study of grammar and syntax. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 330, with a grade of "B" or better recommended or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Enhancement of oral proficiency in Hebrew at the intermediate level via guided discussions and communicative practices. Prerequisite: HEBR 330 or HEBR 340 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 200 or equivalent. IND
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An introductory overview of the health care system in the United States. Includes information on the organizational structure of health care, who comprises the health care team, reimbursement, managed care, the importance of data quality, legal aspects of health care including privacy and security, and the computer-based patient record. Open to all students. LEC
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A study of the language of medicine including word construction, definition and use of terms related to various areas of medical science, hospital service and the allied health specialties. Course requires students to be able to break down medical terms and understand their meanings. (This course is designed for persons wanting a better understanding of medical terms and their usage.) LEC
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This introduction to pharmacology course is intended to provide the student with the background information necessary to practice within the field of Allied Health and Health Information Management. The course covers the fundamentals of pharmacology. The classification of drugs, the use of drug reference materials, and the mechanisms of therapeutic and adverse responses to drugs will be covered in the course. This course will also introduce the processes used for drug approval in the United States. Prerequisite: Instructors permission. LEC
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A study of the language of medicine including word construction, definitions, medical abbreviations, and use of terms related to various areas of medical science, hospital service, and the allied health specialties. LEC
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A course of study relating to the composition of the health record and the department responsible for its security, confidentiality, and availability. The student will compare and contrast the content and formats of the Health Record across the continuum of health care systems; understand the record management issues unique to the health care record; study retrieval systems, record access, record retention guidelines, and record storage options currently available, and trends to the future. LEC
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This course will examine the unique characteristics of the health care industry in order to help the students identify (1) particular management skills needed as a business leader in the health care industry; (2) participate in the theory, skills, and applications of health care management through case studies and team projects. Additionally it will cover the study of management and leadership responsibilities including financial management, budgeting, organizational change, group design, strategic management, and team inter-relationships. Application of leadership and business concepts will be demonstrated through case studies and team projects. Prerequisite: An introductory course in accounting. LEC
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An introduction to the wide spectrum of health care delivery systems in which health information management professionals use their organizational and management skills. Special emphasis is placed on acute care, ambulatory care, home health, hospice care, long-term care, and managed care. The student will focus on how each delivery system is structured, what data sets are collected, the reimbursement schemes used, and how each system is integrated into the current delivery of health care in the United States. LEC
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Emphasis is on the statistical analysis of health care data. Content includes hospital-based statistics, an introduction to basic epidemiological concepts, univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, sampling distributions, statistical estimation, and hypothesis testing for one or two sample designs. Research design and methodology will be discussed. LEC
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An in-depth study of disease processes to include signs, symptoms, test findings, therapies, and treatments of diseases presented through health care professionals lectures in clinical specialties. The focus is on the physical manifestation of disease and the processes that occur within the body. Prerequisites: Courses in Anatomy & lab, Physiology & lab, HEIM 325, and HEIM 330 or consent of the department chairperson. LEC
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This course is concerned with the organizational foundations of information systems and their emerging strategic role in health care. It provides an extensive introduction to real-world systems, focusing on how they are related to organizations and to management. The focus is on the larger environment in which systems operate and how systems relate to organizational design, strategy, and operations. In addition, the course should reinforce and expand the students' understanding of the MS Office applications including project management software applications such as PROJECT and VISIO, and use of presentation applications (POWERPOINT), spreadsheets (EXCEL), and database applications (ACCESS) to an intermediate level. LEC
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The study of medical vocabularies, classification systems, and nomenclatures used in health care. Students will develop an understanding and ability to recognize appropriate clinical classification systems and nomenclatures as to their uses and sources and apply that knowledge to health care information systems to promote effective and efficient communication for research and reimbursement. Student will explore Case Mix, Health Care Data Sets, government regulations impacting reimbursement, and specific classifications used by the various health care organizations. LEC
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The course provides students the opportunity to obtain the knowledge of human resources management skills. The course will study the people within various business organizations and their training, development, retention, motivation, and legal rights within the rapidly changing business and health care sectors. Prerequisite: HEIM 380 Principles in Health Care Management. LEC
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The content will vary depending on material appropriate to students. May be repeated for additional credit utilizing a variety of projects and special assignments. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. FLD
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Through supervised learning situations, students are given opportunities to visit different types of health care facilities in the area. These opportunities vary from year-to-year based upon availability. Opportunities might include (but not limited to) developing competence while practicing a specific HIM task in an actual HIM department, exploring nontraditional HIM career roles, attending guest lectures, or touring ancillary facilities. Prerequisite: HEIM 415 and HEIM 360. LEC
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This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental concepts of the American legal system, to the process of legal change, and to the health care practitioner's potential legal interactions with patients, employees, law enforcement officers, and governmental agencies. Topics include informed consent, malpractice liability, corporate negligence, employment in the hospital, release of information rules and licensure of health professionals. This course will also address the changes in privacy and confidentiality rules and statutes as addressed at the federal level and state level. LEC
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This course is designed to help students understand databases and database management systems. Students will learn to model and understand database design, in conjunction with learning methods to structure data as records, tables, or objects. Students will also learn how query languages are used for searching, sorting, reporting, and other "decision support" activities to best utilize the available data. Along with acquiring knowledge fundamental to management of the electronic health record (EHR), students will develop general technical knowledge to become capable health information professionals. LEC
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Concepts, specifics, and guidelines for coding diseases, operations, and procedures in ICD-9-CM are taught, along with practice and application through the use of coding cases and examples. Emphasis is placed on the importance of utilizing these coding guidelines and conventions with one's newly learned coding skills to achieve accurate and precise coding. The course will reinforce the importance of adequate coding policies and procedures in all health care facilities. Prerequisite: HEIM 435 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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