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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of externally-dominated economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law will be used. The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as GEOG 801.) LEC
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An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. LEC
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The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Unpacking key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills will be emphasized. Guest lectures will serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions LEC
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Designed to fulfill program needs of the Indigenous Nations Studies master's program, this course may meet with appropriate professional or graduate courses. Can be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC
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Students will analyze the qualities of American Indian leadership and will examine circumstances and backgrounds of Indian leaders as heroes and role models paying particular attention to how they responded as individuals, leaders, and as community members of their tribes. Besides surveying noted Indian leaders in treaty negotiations, allotment, removal, war, etc., the course will examine leaders in medicine, education, and recent American Indian history including attention to women leaders. Students will learn about the leaders' tribes and cultures in addition to understanding the ethnohistory of Indian-white relations. LEC
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An individual readings course with a qualified instructor on a topic in Indigenous Nations Studies. LEC
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Internships provide students the opportunity to obtain training and perform professional duties for academic credit at pre-approved indigenous-related agencies, organizations, and communities. Students are required to demonstrate a minimum of 60 contact hours for each one credit hour. To enroll, students must obtain the consent of a GINS faculty member and the Program's Curriculum Committee. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission from instructor. FLD
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This course examines gender and sexuality among indigenous communities in the world. Ethnographies about indigenous women are used to explore a variety of gender and sexual identities. Gendered and sexualized identities are analyzed within broader societal contexts such as the division of labor, kinship, marriage household, and the control of resources. Power relationships are examined between sub-altern women and the larger society, nation and globalizing world in which they play a part. LEC
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An examination of the roles and ideologies of prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers. LEC
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A preparation to train students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. LEC
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An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. LEC
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This course explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. LEC
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With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? An overview will be presented from Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. LEC
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Addresses the law and policy of the United States regarding Indian nations and their members. Issues include the origins and contours of federal plenary power over Indian affairs, the scope of inherent tribal sovereignty, the limits of state power in Indian country, civil and criminal jurisdiction, and gaming. (Same as LAW 914) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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Investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. Traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems. Will offer traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC
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A discussion of what constitutes an archive, including the theory and methodology of archival collections, and an introduction to archiving as a profession. Includes a discussion of records management, with an emphasis on tribal archives collections and tribal records. Includes instruction on arrangement and description of tribal archival collections, funding, environmentally controlled storage, and disaster recovery planning. The class will specifically address the needs of tribal archives: tribal records, oral history interviews, photographs, litigation records, grant writing, and culturally sensitive materials. Students will learn about primary and secondary sources, different formats of writing professional research papers, and will produce a research paper at the end of the semester. LEC
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A discussion of the importance of the oral tradition in Indigenous nations and the difference between oral tradition and oral histories and myth. The class will concentrate on the methodologies of tribal oral history projects, from organizational aspects to personnel issues, equipment needed, sources of grant funding, interview methodology, as well as documentation and preservation of the interviews. The course will discuss how to share and make available these interviews and when access to them needs to be restricted. The students will conduct videotaped oral histories as part of the class exercises and get hands-on experience with the preservation, organization, and transcription of oral history projects. LEC
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A discussion of how museums and exhibits can be a vehicle for Indigenous community empowerment and the importance of Indigenous cultures to interpret their stories themselves. The class will also look at how different nations view the display and handling of their belongings and what kinds of belongings can or should be handled and displayed. LEC
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A discussion of how to develop a grant writing and fundraising plan for a tribal project. Includes how to develop an idea or project and how to prepare a funding campaign. The students will produce a fundraising event and work on the various parts of an actual grant as the final class activity that will be designed to bring in funding to support KU Global Indigenous Nations Studies Program. LEC
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A discussion of the community models of museum management, including museum administration, professional positions within a museum, museum exhibits, public education programs, security, and disaster planning. The course will compare and contrast museum management in European/American museums and tribal museums and how these management styles affect collection policies, exhibit policies, traditional care of collections, sacred and ceremonial item handling and display, NAGPRA and repatriation, and oral histories. LEC
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A discussion of what constitutes a record and how to manage records at the business or government level. Train students in hands-on records management techniques, policies, developing a records retention schedule, and how to plan and design a records management program for records pertaining to Indigenous nations. LEC
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A discussion of what constitutes a record and how to manage records at the business or government level. This is a second level of records management leading to preparation for taking the certification examination. LEC
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A discussion of on traditional care issues of handling and preserving of Indigenous belongings. The class will compare the methods of traditional care at tribal museums vs. conservation of Native items in mainstream museums. LEC
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This course is designed to explore the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. The course examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. The course will focus on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. LEC
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This course extends knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation, and then apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Same as ABSC 710.) LEC
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An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. LEC
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An examination of resource management issues in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in the management schemes. Case study analyses of management techniques derived from European-based science with Indigenous traditions and beliefs. LEC
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A comparison of the attitudes and perspectives towards the natural world developed by different cultural traditions. A review of western attitudes and also the traditional ecological knowledge of Indigenous peoples toward management of natural resources, non-human animals, and the natural world. LEC
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A general introduction to and comparison of major legal systems of the world, with special emphasis given to how those systems reflect differing cultural values in addressing common legal questions. A major goal of the course is to deepen the students' understanding of law and practice in the United States and to broaden their perspective of law beyond the boundaries of the common law systems. (Same as LAW 879.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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Devoted to the law and legal systems that govern the classification and use of one-third of America's land mass. Includes a survey of the acquisition and disposition of the public domain; general federal statutes and doctrines that affect public land law; and different forms of federal lands classifications, including national parks, scenic rivers, and grazing lands. (Same as LAW 975.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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An introduction to national environmental policy and environmental litigation problems, focusing on current issues involving government regulation of activities that generate water and air pollution. Coverage of water pollution typically will include control of point sources and oil spills, while coverage of air pollution will include control of stationary and mobile sources, acid deposition, and introduction to transboundary problems such as the greenhouse effect and global warming. (Same as LAW 980) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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A study of water rights including the riparian and prior appropriation doctrines for surface water, and the various doctrines for groundwater. Private and public water distribution organizations, and special water districts. Water pollution control. Interstate conflicts over water resources. Federal government involvement in water distribution including federal powers and programs. Indian and reserved rights. Kansas water law. (Same as LAW 995.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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This course provides a detailed examination of natural resource law as it applies to Indian Country. Among the topics to be discussed are water law, environmental protection, and subsurface property rights. While not a prerequisite, it is recommended that students take Federal Indian Law before enrolling in this course. (Same as LAW 967.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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Examines legal, governmental, political, social, cultural, and economic issues associated with American Indian tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Includes the source and scope of tribal sovereignty; the threats to tribal sovereignty; and the methods by which tribal sovereignty can be strengthened and revitalized. (Same as LAW 987.) Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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Course for Indigenous Nations Studies students completing non-thesis Master's projects. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. LEC
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Course for Global Indigenous Nations Studies students completing Master's thesis projects. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission from instructor. THE
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Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. LEC
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Continuing vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Prerequisite: GIST 110. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of international topics. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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A seminar designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of global and international studies. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of junior/senior level and above courses that satisfy requirements for the major. LEC
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A seminar designed to introduce honors students to the theory and practice of global and international studies. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of junior/senior level and above courses that satisfy requirements for the major. LEC
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This course examines approaches to the study of culture, politics, and society as applied in international studies research. Substantive and disciplinary content vary by instructor, but typically include such topics as economic development, ethnicity, religion, democratization, peace and conflict issues, and cultural studies. The study of these topics is accompanied by discussions of the principles of theory development, proper research design, choosing a research topic, construction of literature reviews, and the use of library resources in international studies research. LEC
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A central issue in international studies is globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of societies and economies. This course examines globalization from an historical and contemporary perspective. Major topics include (but are not necessarily limited to) the historical expansion of the West since 1500, the growth of international economic institutions, conflict among global cultures, the future of state sovereignty, and the challenges of economic integration. LEC
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An introduction to international trade and finance, theories of economic development, and international economic structures. Not appropriate for economics majors. LEC
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Examination of the components of culture, economic and political anthropology, major global cultural areas, and the impact of cultural differences as expressed through language, literature, religion, thought, and motivation in cross-cultural communications. LEC
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A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include Western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and the spread of international institutions. Current issues will vary, but may include environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as HIST 705.) LEC
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Survey of different governmental structures in the contemporary world and the ways these countries have confronted issues such as modernization and development, economic security, ethnic pluralism and conflict, and globalization. LEC
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A study of one or more selected topics in international studies. Course may be taken more than once. LEC
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Individual and supervised readings in a selected area of international studies. Course is repeatable with permission of the program director. LEC
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This course will review and analyze the current literature on China's social and political development, including a wide range of topics within political science. There is a rich body of literature within each topic such as civil society in China, legal reform, political culture, nationalism, gender issues, ethnicity, political behavior, elections, economic development, and inequality. This course will introduce key literature within each topic focusing on the debates among China scholars as well as how these debates fit in the general field of political science. (Same as EALC 888 and POLS 888.) Prerequisite: POLS 668 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Independent study in preparation for the Comprehensive M.A. examination. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. May be repeated. LEC
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Enrollment for writing thesis for master's degree. THE
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The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. LEC
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The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of Greek 104, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or GRK 105. LEC
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A continuation of GRK 105, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or 105; and membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Systematic grammar review and selected texts from Plato and Euripides. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Plato, Aristotle and the Attic orators, with attention to issues of interpretation and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
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Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and the lyric poets, with attention to issues of literary interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
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Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from the historians Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, as well as from the Greek novels and the New Testament. Attention will be given to issues of interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
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Selections from Homer's Odyssey, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC
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Selections from Homer's Iliad, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC
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Readings in classical Greek texts. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or the equivalent. IND
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Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Greek literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay adviser. IND
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A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic Corpus. (Same as PHIL 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Close reading of texts from Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, the lyric poets. LEC
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Close reading of texts from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes. LEC
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Close reading of texts from Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Attic orators. LEC
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Close reading of texts from Plato, Aristotle, the Pre-Socratics. LEC
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Extensive reading in a variety of Greek authors. LEC
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Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Greek. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
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Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Greek or equivalent. RSH
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In this course, students study the important principles for writing a proposal, thesis, or dissertation and apply these principles to their own writing projects. Emphasis will be placed on the traits of thesis/dissertation chapters and the essential elements for these chapters. Students will analyze a sample from their field in order to understand the rhetorical structure. In conferences, students will receive feedback on how well their own proposal, thesis, or dissertation reflects the essential elements; they will also receive feedback on their grammar and editing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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In this course, you will observe, critique, create and practice scholarly presentations appropriate for conferences, seminars and thesis or dissertation defenses. Based on readings and observations, you will learn the major creative components and organizational structures for conference presentations including: introductions, poster sessions, short lectures or research presentations, and award presentations and acceptances. You will also observe and critique scholars in your field to learn keys to successful presentations in your discipline. You will observe and practice using appropriate delivery modes and skills and develop visual aids for presentations. For the major assignments you will practice and demonstrate the skills above through creation and formal presentation of scholarly presentations on topics in your field. These presentations will vary from 2-3 minute poster sessions to short lecture presentations and will culminate in a major research presentation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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These tutorials are designed for students who are writing comprehensive exams, proposals, prospectuses, or theses or dissertations. Students will submit their writing to the instructor two days before their weekly meeting, where will review what they have written. Students will be taught strategies for improving content, organization, argument structure, and grammar and editing. They will also read materials about writing effective exams, proposals or thesis or dissertation chapters. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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This graduate-level interdisciplinary class has four major components in which students will 1) learn the basics of grant writing, 2) hear a series of lectures by experts in grant writing and grant reviewing, 3) identify possible grant sources, and 4) write grants and review grants. Students will read about grant writing, search for grant sources and complete a list of possible sources, and complete a series of exercises to build their grant writing and grant management skills. The writing assignments will include a short informal grant application as well as a longer, more formal proposal. Students will get feedback on the grants they write from course instructors as well as other grant writing experts. Graded on a Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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In an increasingly competitive academic job market, candidates must not only demonstrate the capacity for innovative research, but also a strong record of production and publication in their fields. Through a combination of visits to the University of Kansas Press, presentations by widely-published senior KU faculty, workshops with editors of academic and literary journals, this course will provide graduate students with instruction and guidance about publishing in their disciplines, as well as deepen students' understanding of wider academic practices. During the semester, students will 1) identify appropriate academic markets for their work; 2) prepare a manuscript for publication; 3) self-promote and 4) identify popular publication opportunities and potential paying markets. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This class will include a series of workshops introducing strategies and tools for success in graduate school and beyond. Students will hear peers and experts describe the strategies for succeeding in graduate school, getting funding while in graduate school, and how to make the kinds of presentations that are expected in a graduate program. Student will learn how to 1) conduct effective database searches in their fields, 2) use ENDNOTE, 3) use Word to save time in creating long documents, and 4) use campus resources to succeed. Students will participate in all assigned workshops and write a 7-page reflective paper on what they learned from the workshops. Graded on Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Open only to newly admitted and current graduate students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This class is for students who want to hone their reading and writing skills early in their degree programs. You will learn to analyze the structure of professional texts and gain practice in the basic genres of academic writing. You will complete in- and out-of-class reading and writing assignments building toward a final research-based paper. The form of this written paper may vary depending on your needs, but must integrate material from original research and focus on a central problem or research question. Emphasis is placed on citing and quoting primary materials, organizational strategies, and grammar, editing, and usage. You will submit a portfolio and a reflection paper at the end of class. One-on-one conferences/tutorials are part of the course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This multidisciplinary writing workshop will provide an environment for focused writing. Instruction will include two components: 1) weekly one-on-one meetings with the workshop leader and/or staff and 2) mini-seminars on such topics as how to be more efficient with your writing, how to avoid typical roadblocks, how to stay motivated, and how to shed stress. Grade on Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Open to newly admitted and current graduate students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This course will provide intensive writing support to graduate students. Students will discuss their respective works in progress in an interdisciplinary workshop setting. Additionally, students will attend brief one-on-one conferences with the course instructor twice a week for the duration of the session. There are no requirements for the course other than attendance and writing. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Open to newly admitted and current graduate students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A course covering current issues in teaching, research, and service for graduate students seeking professional careers in academic settings. Prerequisite: Selection for participation in the Graduate School's Preparing Future Faculty program, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course will cover basic techniques of moral reasoning, especially as applied to ethical issues in the physical sciences and engineering. Topics covered will include the ethical conduct of research, the federal and professional guidelines for different kinds of research, and the ethical dimensions of publication and professional life. Emphasis will be on practical applications, cases and student involvement. (Same as MDCM 804, NURO 804, P&TX 804, and PHCH 804.) Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in STEM discipline. LEC
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The aim of the course is to teach the methodologies and skills required for conducting research in the area of biomedical sciences. The learning experience will be tailored to individual needs, personalized instructions, with the opportunity to learn new skills and competencies and exposure to new developments. Depending on the selected research placement, the student will learn to: utilize a variety of basic biochemical and molecular biology laboratory skills; develop the ability to independently formulate a testable experimental hypothesis; design experiments to test formulated hypothesis in a classic application of the scientific method. Progress of the student will be monitored through weekly laboratory meetings with members of the research lab. The student will present their progress and have the ability to receive constructive feedback from laboratory members. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LBN
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Postdoctoral Studies RSH
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Effective use of language to communicate scientific ideas and concepts. Topics include: Intense use of the English language for scientific communication both written and verbal; emphasis will be placed upon verbal; proper pronunciation, grammar, sentence organization, and word choice. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon listening and reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend a weekly lecture and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon grammar, punctuation, listening and reading comprehension, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend two weekly lectures and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will be given an exam at the end of each part of the textbook and will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course requires a 6 hour time commitment each week over the semester. During each weekly session the student will observe various medical practitioners in specific health care environments. The course gives the bioengineer an opportunity to see the inside of medical practice and exposes students to medical questions and challenges that could provide opportunities for engineers to contribute to the improvement of medical practice. Each student must select a concentration for this course from a health care specialty depending on availability. Some specialty options might include: Orthopedic, Radiology, Cardiology, Physical Therapy, etc. Grading will be pass/fail based on participation and journal keeping. PREREQUISITES: Graduate engineering standing, Consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is the first of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of metabolism, protein structure and an introduction to nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the second of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of molecular genetics, DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription and translation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the first semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 850 (Proteins and Metabolism) and GSMC 851 (Molecular Genetics). LEC
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This course is the third of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cellular structure and function. Topics include the lipid bilayer, membrane proteins, and cellular organelles. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the fourth of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cell communication. Topics include G-protein-coupled signaling, cellular cytoskeleton; cell cycle control; cell death; extracellular matrix; and cancer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the second semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 853 (Cellular Structure) and GSMC 854 (Cell Communication). LEC
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The objective of this course is to introduce students to research ethics. Students will learn and discuss some of the following areas of ethics in research: 1) sources of errors in science, 2) Scientific Fraud, 3) plagiarism and misrepresentation, 4) conflicts of interest, and 5) confidentiality. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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The objective of the course is to teach students how to organize and present data in a clear and concise manner at national meetings. Students are taught basic principles of organizing data for presentation and then learn through the actual presentation of data in simulated platform sessions held in the course. Videotapes are made of the presentations, and students are then given a constructive critique of their presentation by the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted to the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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