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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A general study of the occurrence, properties, origin, and migration of petroleum. Studies of various oil fields and oil-bearing basins. Laboratory studies include well logs, subsurface mapping, and cross-sections. Prerequisite: GEOL 331, GEOL 562, and GEOL 572; or C&PE 527, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Application of well logging measurements to interpretation subsurface. LEC
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Geological, geophysical, and engineering characterization of a petroleum reservoir. Includes mapping; petrophysical, production, and pressure analysis; and numerical modeling. Considers economic analysis of steps to improve oil recovery. Students who have completed GEOL 837 may not take GEOL 537 for credit. Prerequisite: GEOL 535 and permission of instructor. LEC
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A critical study of landforms in relation to tectonics, climatic environment, and geologic processes. The use of geomorphic methods in the interpretation of Cenozoic history is emphasized. Laboratory exercises in analysis of field observations, maps, and photographs. Required field trip and fee. (Same as GEOG 541.) Prerequisite: GEOL 101 and GEOL 103, GEOG 104 and GEOG 105, or GEOL 304 and GEOL 103. LEC
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Consideration of geologic factors affecting engineering projects. Topics include: techniques of site exploration, engineering properties of soil and rock, geologic conditions important in the design of major structures, and geologic information useful in land-use planning. Prerequisite: An introductory course in geology or consent of instructor. LEC
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Physical description of hydrogeologic media. Elementary groundwater hydraulics: analytical and graphical solutions for steady-state application. Well hydraulics and pumping tests. Basic groundwater geology. Effects of topography and geology on regional flow systems. Field and numerical delineation and analysis of groundwater flow systems and applications. Chemical characteristics of groundwaters and their relationship to aquifer geology and hydrology. Investigations of groundwater quality and contamination. Prerequisite: Two semesters each of calculus, physics, and chemistry. LEC
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Summer session. The study of the principles of field geology and the application of field methods to solve geological problems. Includes use of topographic maps and aerial photographs for geological mapping, the study of stratigraphic methods by measuring sections, and working field trips to areas of regional geological interest. Given at the University of Kansas Geology Field Camp near Canon City, Colorado. Fee. Prerequisite: GEOL 360 and GEOL 562, or consent of instructor. FLD
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Summer session. The application of the principles of field geology to solve complex geological problems in the field. Given at the University of Kansas Geology Field Camp near Canon City, Colorado, or at other sites as appropriate. Fee. Prerequisite: GEOL 560. FLD
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A study of primary and secondary rock-structures and their genesis. Includes techniques of structural analysis and introduces mechanics of rock deformations. Lectures, laboratory, and required field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 311 and PHSX 111 or PHSX 114 or PHSX 211, and MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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Scientific assessment of natural disasters with concentration on earthquake effects and their mitigation. Briefly treats volcanic eruptions, tidal waves, floods, global warming, severe weather, and catastrophic meteorite impacts in a geological and human framework. A research paper or project is required. Prerequisite: An introductory course in a physical science. LEC
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Introductory study of gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical, and thermal properties of the earth. Measurements, interpretation, and applications to exploration, earth structure, and global tectonics. Prerequisite: an introductory course in geology, MATH 116 or MATH 122, and PHSX 115 or PHSX 212. PHSX 115 or PHSX 212 may be taken concurrently. LEC
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Study of physical processes in the solid Earth and of geophysical approaches to studying Earth systems at regional and global scales. Topics include global potential fields, thermal regime, rheology and Earth deformation, earthquakes and seismic structure, plate motions and global tectonics. (Same as PHSX 528.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in geology, MATH 116 or MATH 122, and PHSX 115 or PHSX 212 or PHSX 214. LEC
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Application of seismic reflection and refraction techniques to the description of near-surface geology and the exploration for energy and mineral resources. Theory of seismic information, data collection, data processing using computers, and geologic interpretation. Prerequisite: A course in computer programming, either FORTRAN or C, which may be taken concurrently. An introductory geophysics course, such as GEOL 572. LEC
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Use of gravity, magnetic, and electrical signals in the exploration for energy and mineral resources. Elementary potential field theory, data collection methods, data analysis, and interpretation using computers. Prerequisite: A course in computer programming, either FORTRAN or C, which may be taken concurrently. An introductory geophysics course, such as GEOL 572. LEC
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Application of the methods of geophysical exploration to evaluate, mitigate, and prevent environmental problems below the surface of the earth. Development of fundamental principles and discussion of environmental case histories using seismic, gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, electrical, and radar methods. Prerequisite: An introductory course in geology, MATH 116 or MATH 122, and PHSX 115 or PHSX 212. LEC
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May include lectures, discussions, readings, laboratory, and fieldwork in geology. Will be given as needed. May be taken more than once. LEC
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Introduction to the theory and practice of X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis as applied to geological materials. Includes safety training necessary for the operation of X-ray analytical equipment in the department. Prerequisite: GEOL 311 and PHSX 115 or PHSX 212. LEC
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This course is geared towards developing a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the fundamentals of rock and mineral deformation necessary to interpret comprehensively microstructural data. Microstructures and petrofabrics contain a wealth of information on kinematics, rheology, and boundary conditions of deforming rocks, important information that often goes unnoticed and unused. This course builds on knowledge acquired in undergraduate structural geology and petrology courses and will give students the tools for a more rigorous and sophisticated evaluation of thin sections and quantitative microstructural and textural data. Required field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 512 and GEOL 562; or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Advanced topics in igneous and metamorphic petrology with emphasis on chemical and isotopic modeling. Course may be repeated, as topics covered vary. LEC
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This advanced course is intended to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals and an appreciation of the complexities of thermochronology. The primary focus of this course is on modern thermochronological dating methods, a quantitative understanding of noble gas diffusion, data acquisition and interpretation, numerical modeling of complex thermochronological data, and hands-on laboratory experience in the KU thermochronology facilities. Prerequisite: MATH 122 and GEOL 717; or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Application of chemical equilibria and kinetics to geological environments and processes, with emphasis on processes involving solution equilibria. Includes introduction to thermodynamic aspects of equilibria. Prerequisite: CHEM 188 and MATH 122. LEC
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Classical thermodynamics with an emphasis on phase equilibria, solid-solution chemistry, and modeling of natural systems. Prerequisite: Second semester calculus, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Principles and applications of natural radioactive systems for geochronology and cosmochronology, including use of radiogenic isotopes as geochemical tracers. Prerequisite: GEOL 512 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Principles and applications of equilibria among stable isotopes in the geological environment, with emphasis on the isotopic systems of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Prerequisite: GEOL 715 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Systematics, paleontology, evolution, and biostratigraphy of microfossils, particularly foraminifera, ostracodes, and conodonts. Preparation of material for study. Applications of micropaleontology to geologic problems. Prerequisite: GEOL 521 or BIOL 100 or 152. LEC
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Principles of ecology as applied to the interpretation of past environments. Prerequisite: GEOL 521. LEC
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Provides directed, practical experience in care and management of paleontology collections, public education, exhibits, and museum administration with emphasis tailored to fit the needs and interests of each student. Students should expect to spend a minimum of five hours per week for each hour in which they are enrolled. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, BIOL 799, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD
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The study of the coevolution of the Earth and its biota. The class will focus on using phylogenetic approaches with fossil taxa to study how tectonic change has influenced the evolution of life and also to determine what evolutionary patterns can tell us about the nature and sequence of geological events. Prerequisite: GEOL 521, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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General account of the osteology, geologic distribution, and evolution of the principal groups of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as BIOL 790.) Prerequisite: GEOL 105 or GEOL 304, or GEOL 521. LEC
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Evolution of mammals and anatomical modifications involved in the process as ascertained from the fossil record. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as BIOL 791.) Prerequisite: GEOL 105 or GEOL 304 or GEOL 521. LEC
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This course will present a broad survey of topics in macroevolution including the differences between micro- and macroevolutionary patterns and processes and the manners of formulating and analyzing macroevolutionary questions. Discussions will focus on the relevance of hierarchy theory and levels of selection; an overview of species concepts, both ontological and epistemological; and an analysis of the neo-Darwinian synthesis as related to innovations in evolutionary theory. In addition, the relevance of contingency and extinction to evolutionary theory will be emphasized. LEC
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Paleopedology is the study of ancient soils preserved in the geologic record. The course covers concepts of paleopedology and its applications to the interpretation of paleoenvironmental, paleoecologic, and paleohydrogeologic settings and its use in sequence stratigraphy and paleoclimatology. Prerequisite: GEOG 535, GEOL 331, or GEOL 532; or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Ichnology is the study of organism-substrate interactions. The class will cover concepts and applications of ichnology in the marine and continental realms, including the behavior of such organisms as microbes, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates preserved in the geologic record as trace fossils. Ichnology is applied in geology and in the petroleum industry to interpret ancient environments, hydrogeology, ecology, and climate. Prerequisite: GEOL 331, GEOL 521, or GEOL 532; or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Processes that operate in recent sedimentary environments, responses of sediment to those processes, and criteria for determining depositional environments of ancient sedimentary rocks. Lectures, practical exercises, and field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 331 or GEOL 532. LEC
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Patterns and processes of contemporaneous carbonate deposition and diagenesis, depositional models; applications to interpretation of carbonate rocks. Lecture, discussion, laboratory and field trips. Prerequisite: GEOL 532 (may be taken concurrently). LEC
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Detailed discussions of processes and landforms characteristic of specific environments. Considered during separate semesters will be general methodology, and fluvial, arid regions, glacial, and shoreline geomorphology. Course may be taken more than once. (Same as GEOG 741.) Prerequisite: GEOL 541. LEC
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A study of fluid flow in the subsurface including transport of constituents with the fluid. Physical transport will consider (1) the origin of basic parameters such as porosity and hydraulic conductivity, and their relationship to typical geologic materials, (2) basic equations of flow, such as Darcy's Law and the conservation equation, and (3) application of these concepts. Applications considered may include hydraulic testing, modeling, and regional flow systems. Chemical transport will consider the processes of solute and contaminant mass movement in porous and fractured media by advection and diffusion. The effects of attenuating mechanisms such as partitioning, chemical and biological transformations will also be discussed. The mathematical expression of these processes will be developed and applied using computer models. (Same as CE 754.) Prerequisite: Differential Equations and Introductory Hydrogeology or Fluid Mechanics or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture and discussion of chemical and microbiological controls on groundwater chemistry. Topics include thermodynamic and microbiological controls on water-rock reactions; kinetics; and microbiological, chemical and isotopic tools for interpreting water chemistry with respect to chemical weathering and shallow diagenesis. Origins of water chemistry, changes along groundwater flow paths, and an introduction to contaminant biogeochemistry will be discussed through the processes of speciation, solubility, sorption, ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, elemental and isotopic partitioning, microbial metabolic processes and microbial ecology. An overview of the basics of environmental microbiology, including cell structure and function, microbial metabolism and respiration, microbial genetics and kinetics of microbial growth will be covered. (Same as CE 753.) Prerequisite: One year of chemistry, one year of calculus, one year of biology, an introductory course in hydrogeology, or consent of the instructors. LEC
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A detailed field study of a carefully selected area that includes features of several phases of geology. Field trip fee. Prerequisite: GEOL 561 or equivalent and departmental approval. FLD
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Topics vary with demand and include fundamental features of plate tectonics, interpretation and distribution of regional geology of mountain belts with emphasis on tectonic setting and processes, regional geology, and tectonics of selected mountain belts. Prerequisite: GEOL 562, GEOL 512, or GEOL 331, and GEOL 572. LEC
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Topics to vary with demand and include heat flow, wave propagation, synthetic seismograms, groundwater exploration, geothermal exploration, electrical methods in exploration, rock mechanics-tectonophysics, rock magnetism, geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, geophysical inverse theory, and others upon sufficient demand. May be repeated for different topics. (Same as PHSX 727.) Prerequisite: GEOL 572 or GEOL 573/PHSX 528 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Fourier analysis, sampling theory, prediction and interpolation of geophysical data, filtering theory, correlation techniques, deconvolution. Examples will be chosen from various fields of geophysics. (Same as PHSX 722.) Prerequisite: MATH 250/AE 250/ARCE 250/CE 250/C&PE 250/EECS 250/EPHX 250/ME 250 and either GEOL 572 or GEOL 573 or PHSX 528. LEC
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General theory of seismic waves, wave field extrapolation (migration) by finite difference methods, construction of travel-time curves, reflection and attenuation of coefficients, earthquake source mechanism, distribution and forecasting of earthquakes. (Same as PHSX 723.) Prerequisite: MATH 250/AE 250/ARCE 250/CE 250/C&PE 250/EECS 250/EPHX 250/ME 250 and either GEOL 572 or GEOL 573 or PHSX 528. LEC
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Application of finite difference methods to solve the partial differential equations that commonly occur in the study of geophysics. Representative examples will be drawn from groundwater flow, gravity and magnetics modeling, and seismic wave propagation. Emphasis will be on obtaining actual solutions for practical problems. Prerequisite: MATH 250, or MATH 320, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Theoretical and applied study of all aspects of near-surface reflection, refraction, and surface-wave seismology from design and acquisition to interpretation. Prerequisite: MATH 250, GEOL 572, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, BIOL 700, HIST 722 and MUSE 706.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as AMS 700, BIOL 787, HIST 723, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, BIOL 788, HIST 720, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, BIOL 785, HIST 728, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, HIST 721, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Selected offerings in geology. Intended primarily for graduate students and qualified seniors. May include lectures, discussions, reading, laboratory and fieldwork. May be taken more than once. LEC
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Advanced geological, geophysical, and engineering characterization of a petroleum reservoir. Includes mapping; petrophysical, production, and pressure analysis; and numerical modeling. Considers economic analysis of steps to improve recovery. Students who have completed GEOL 537 may not take GEOL 837 for credit. LEC
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Introduction to field and laboratory methods commonly used in physical hydrogeology. Practical experience with common water level measurement techniques, various well pumping techniques, well installation and geologic core sampling, and hydraulic testing. Prerequisite: Introductory course in hydrogeology and familiarity with computer use for data processing, or consent of instructor. FLD
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Introduction to laboratory methods for evaluating reactive transport parameters, followed by development and implementation of computer models. Students will gain experience building models starting from basic transport equations using a spreadsheet platform and, where appropriate, commercial software packages. Prerequisite: GEOL 751 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. LAB
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Practical experience in measuring unstable chemical parameters in groundwater, including pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, temperature, alkalinity, specific conductance, and turbidity. Practical experience in collecting water samples for chemical analysis, choosing appropriate sample containers and preservation methods, and special techniques for collecting samples for determination of parameters sensitive to environmental changes such as oxygen level or temperature. Prerequisite: GEOL 753 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. FLD
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Practical experience in cultivating, enumerating and visualizing groundwater microorganisms. Geochemical and molecular techniques for studying microbial community diversity, biomineralization and mineral dissolution, and biodegradation of organic contaminants will be covered. Practical experience in collecting water samples for preservation of microorganisms sensitive to environmental changes such as oxygen level or temperature. Prerequisite: GEOL 753 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. FLD
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May be repeated. RSH
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Detailed study of systematics, morphology, stratigraphic distribution and paleoecology of major groups of organisms in the fossil record. Specific group or groups covered will vary according to student and faculty needs and interests. May be repeated. Prerequisite: An introductory course in invertebrate paleontology. LEC
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Study of the physical and chemical factors important in the genesis and diagenesis of carbonate rocks. Includes the application of principles learned from research on modern marine environments to the interpretation of ancient carbonates. Various analytical techniques are covered with emphasis on thin section petrography. Prerequisite: GEOL 331 and GEOL 732. LEC
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Description, classification, and interpretation of sedimentary rocks, emphasizing petrographic methods applied to terrigenous rocks and interpretation of provenance of sedimentary sequences. Prerequisite: GEOL 511 and GEOL 531 or GEOL 532. LEC
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A review of the principles of the geological sciences. Fields considered are: geomorphology, igneous petrology, metamorphic petrology, invertebrate paleontology, groundwater, geochemistry, stratigraphy, sedimentation, micropaleontology, mineralogy, structural geology, and geophysics. Several may be taken concurrently. May be taken more than one semester. LEC
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A special reading course for candidates for advanced degrees in other departments, designed to aid them in obtaining a reading knowledge of German, for purposes of research. Enrollment for undergraduate credit is required. An intensive study of the fundamentals of grammar, proceeding to the reading of material of medium difficulty. Three recitations weekly. Intended primarily for graduate students, but open also to seniors planning graduate study. The course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study in German. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 100. Review of grammar, with emphasis on reading and translation of material of an advanced nature in the candidate's general field. Three recitations weekly. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the first course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 104. LEC
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Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Five hours of recitation per week. Intended as the first course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Open for only 2 hours credit to students who have completed GERM 102. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 104, with additional cultural study. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Open for only 2 hours credit for students who have completed GERM 102. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to University Honors Program. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the second course in sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 104. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of grammar with review of material covered in Elementary German I; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One semester of college German or the equivalent prior to entering K.U. LEC
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Continuation of grammar; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Intended as the second course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 110. Prerequisite: GERM 104 or GERM 106. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 108, with additional cultural study. Five hours of recitation per week. Prerequisite: Open to students who received the grade of A in GERM 104 or GERM 106, or an A or B in GERM 105. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 110. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the third course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 108. Prerequisite: GERM 106. LEC
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Same content as GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216 but accomplished in one semester of intensive study. This course also includes readings, lectures, and discussions on topics in art, history, and politics. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Eligibility for GERM 108 and consultation with the department. LEC
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Discussion of landmark works in German drama, poetry, and prose. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films in their historical and cultural contexts. About fifteen full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the film's sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 124. Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films and their historical and cultural contexts. About 15 full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the films' sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussions in English on German intellectual thought, the fine arts, mythology, and folklore in historical and literary context. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussion in English on the immigration and acculturation of German-speaking ethnic groups in Colonial America and the United States. Emphasis on Americanization during the Colonial period, discrimination in the pre-Civil War era, integration in the post-Civil War era, anti-German hysteria during the World War I era, exiles during the Nazi period, and the near total assimilation of this ethnic group in the United States during the 20th century. LEC
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An introduction to the pagan myths and beliefs of Teutonic antiquity and their survival in the popular traditions of Germanic countries. Selected readings in the Eddas and other sources (in translation). General orientation toward aspects of comparative mythology, archaeology, and anthropology. No knowledge of German or Scandinavian languages is required. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 108 or GERM 110. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Intended as the third course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216, or as the fourth course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 108, GERM 110, or equivalent.. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 212, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 108 and GERM 110 with a grade of A or GERM 109 with a grade of A or B. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Intended as the fourth course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216, or as the fifth course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 216, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 212 with a grade of A or GERM 213 with a grade of A or B. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, and reading with the focus on the basics of the German business communication. Especially recommended for students planning to take GERM 352 and GERM 462. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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One-semester course meeting seven times a week. The material covered is the same as in GERM 212 and contains selections from GERM 216. This course includes written and oral composition, conversation, and grammar review; readings and discussions in the areas of German literature and culture (e.g. art, history, and politics). Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 108 or equivalent and consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed for the elementary study of a Germanic language. Course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in German. course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Analysis of excerpts (read in the original German) from the works of such writers as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Einstein. Prerequisite: GERM 212. LEC
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Intended primarily for premedical students and for students majoring in the natural and social sciences. In addition to the class text there are appropriate outside readings. Prerequisite: GERM 212. LEC
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History, theory, and practice of German folklore with selected readings in German and discussions in English. Special emphasis on the contributions of the Grimm brothers. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Taught in English. Provides a general introduction to German culture and its transformations in international contexts through an examination of the historical, cultural, and literary impact of German emigration and immigration. Historical periods covered include the emigration wave to America after the failed 1848 revolution, the exile communities during the Nazi era, and the multinational migrations in contemporary Germany. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. For centuries German scientists, philosophers and poets have produced groundbreaking literature that has featured magic, monsters and the occult sciences. German poets introduced popular themes, such as the Faust legend and the pact with the devil, and they introduced one of the most popular monsters into literature - the vampire. In this course we will read and discuss fictional and nonfictional works by German authors that address these themes, and we will discuss the influence that these works have had on other nations' literatures. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. This course offers an introduction to art and culture in Germany. This is achieved by exploring a variety of themes, such as music, the arts, pop culture, theater and film. The course places special attention on the historical and cultural context from which these art forms were created. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. An introduction to Berlin as a microcosm of major historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments in German culture since 1800. Complex epochs such as Bismarckian Prussia, Nazi Germany, the Cold War and Unification are illustrated through diverse materials including news reports, poetry, sociological accounts as well as film and other media. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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For students enrolled in the KU Summer Language Institute in Germany. Exercises in selected topics of German grammar. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Extensive practice in writing creatively and speaking German with an emphasis on German history and extensive review of grammar and advanced writing structures. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Extensive practice in writing creatively and speaking German with an emphasis on German culture and extensive review of grammar and advanced writing structures. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Literary masterpieces of the early European Middle Ages will be studied in English translation, especially legendary, heroic, and epic works written in Celtic and Anglo-Saxon, Norse and German, French and Spanish. Topics in Latin culture will include poetry and liturgy, Augustine and Boethius, the Dark Ages and the Carolingian Renaissance. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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