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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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This course builds upon the foundation created by the Introduction to Entrepreneurship course. It will provide the student with two learning opportunities: first, it details the critical success factors of starting a new venture, growing it and finally harvesting it profitably; secondly, this course will provide hands-on instruction regarding the development of a complete and compelling business plan. Students will work as teams on the development of a business plan for the purposes of commercializing an innovative business concept or KU lab-sourced technology. These student teams will also present and defend their business plans at various venues including intercollegiate competitions for the purposes of improving their team interaction skills, their presentation capabilities. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on the development of new business ideas for new or established organizations, creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry, potential customers, market segment, barriers to entry and competitor set. The development of each of these subjects will lead to a feasibility analysis which each student will prepare for his/her chosen new venture. This course will also examine the development of the optimal sales and distribution. Additionally, the course will provide an understanding of how to translate the product/service idea to the business concept and marketing positioning. Lastly, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing communications program. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course looks at the unique aspects of owning and managing a small business, family business or franchise, with the owners having close control over operations and management decisions. Students will examine the startup options of buying, starting, or franchising; operations and human resources management; the unique factors of the family business; marketing, including setting prices, choosing a location, developing competitive advantage, positioning, and promotion with limited resources; financial statements, accounting systems, financing, cash flow and the working-capital cycle; and exit through selling, bequeathing, or dissolving the business. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to help the student apply the models and theories learned in previous courses in practical application to actual entrepreneurial challenges. These challenges will be presented to the student in either a simulated online environment or via the development and solution delivery of an actual small business/entrepreneurial business challenge. The environment in which the students will operate will be determined by the inventory of projects with entrepreneurs which are available at the time of the course offering. In the simulated environment, teams of entrepreneurs, each with defined but rotating roles and responsibilities, will assess the continually changing business challenge, supervise the collection of appropriate operating revenue and cost data, obtain input from `direct reports/supplier' (their teammates) and make the decisions which must consider all disciplines of the business. Each of the team's decisions will be measured via its impact on the venture's income statement, balance sheet and cash flow position. The student will be graded on his/her team's ability to increase the venture's net worth. In the real world environment, student entrepreneurial teams will be challenged with a live project the solution to which will provide both a meaningful experiential learning opportunity for the students and a demonstrable beneficial impact on the venture. Students in project teams will be assigned to entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs or small business owners operating in the region to address and solve specific business challenges which those dynamic organizations are confronting. Students will define problems in management, marketing, finance, information management, ethical decision-making and operations strategies as they apply to small and entrepreneurial businesses. In addition to solving a typical entrepreneurial business problem, students will have the opportunity to interact with actual entrepreneurs and witness first hand the challenges which these businesses confront regularly, both during the project and in the final, culminating project presentation to the business owners/management. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 (MGMT 475). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in entrepreneurship not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Enrollment restricted. RSH
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new venture's financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Not open to students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: ENTR 703. LEC
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This course will focus on identifying and evaluating the business opportunity, the strategies to be developed and implemented as well as entrepreneurial capabilities required for marketplace success. Development of a robust and compelling business concept will be emphasized. Analyses of the industry, competition, the new business points of strategic leverage, creation of an effective business model and funding strategies will be studied. Financing the new venture, sourcing and structuring the required deal capital will be explored and attention to managing rapid growth and exit strategies will be provided. This course is not open to students with credit in ENTR 450. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of entrepreneurship to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This first interior design studio will introduce the principles and elements of interior design, including design composition, space planning, furniture layout, color, and finish materials. It will also provide the direction and opportunity for the student to apply basic design and drawing skills developed in the Foundations courses to meet project program requirements in a series of projects of increasing complexity. Students will be expected to produce process diagrams, plans, elevations, models and finish boards. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. Corequisite: ARCH 103 and BDS 212. LAB
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The study of the production, manufacture, and characteristics of the important textile fibers. The construction and testing of fabrics. Demonstrations and studio work to accompany study. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. LEC
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Introduction to the principles and elements of interior design will continue with emphasis on diagramming, spatial organization, detailing, presentation techniques, and documentation methods. Students will research furniture systems, furnishings and equipment for large and/or complex interior design projects in new and/or old buildings. They will apply the principles of environmentally responsible design in interior design projects. Prerequisite: ENVD 200 and BDS 212. LAB
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Students will study the visual qualities, technical characteristics, and applications of building materials, room and furniture finishes in interior installations. This course will provide an overview of the building, health, life and safety codes, the maintenance and life cost. Class will be structured around lectures, guest speakers, and field trips to construction sites, factories, and design facilities. Prerequisite: ENVD 200. LEC
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This course will focus on drawing as a tool of communication through freehand exercises that explore observation and perception, form and proportion, dimensional illusion and expressive characteristics using a variety of materials and media as they relate to environments. This course will use two- and three- dimensional software specific to Environmental Interior design pursuits. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Environmental/Interior program and have completed BDS 102, and be co-enrolled in the ENVD 200 studio course. LEC
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Planning and design of small to medium size commercial interiors. Studying the organization and utilization of spaces as affected by the needs of the client and the architectural concepts of the structure. Project experiences focus on development of specialized spaces in retailing, health care, hospitality, businesses: selection of furniture and furnishings; the development of custom design casework and millwork. Prerequisite: ENVD 200 and ENVD 202. Corequisite: ARCH 531. LAB
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Examining and analyzing essential information necessary to determine the clients' present and future operational requirements and the space, facilities, and services required for support. Establishing pre-planning concepts and guidelines on building and space utilization. Effort is directed toward developing space into a functional, flexible, and aesthetic environment in which to work. Study includes the use of questionnaires, organization charts, space study and standards, space projections, space tabulations, and space distribution using interaction, blocking, and layering diagrams. Prerequisite: ENVD 200, ENVD 202, EECS 128 and MATH 101. LAB
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Investigations and explorations of work space strategies of large scale corporate offices that include conventional, open office, alternative officing or related strategies. Assignment is usually based on a typical floor of a high rise building that ranges between 15,000 to 20,000 square feet of interior space. Planning effort focuses on developing the most compatible circulation flow within the building both internally and externally. Attention will be placed on building feasibility study and achieve building and ADA codes compliances. Other experiences include research and selection of furniture systems based on understanding of furniture system types, hardware, assemblies, lighting, power and communication capabilities. Prerequisite: ENVD 304. LAB
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Research and specifications of interior materials and furniture. Awareness of professional and product liabilities as well as federal, state, and local government regulations and standards. Emphasis on quality control using performance and system approach, fire performance testing and life cycle casting as methods of evaluating materials and providing a basis for making responsible decisions. Exercises on working drawings and schedules. Prerequisite: ENVD 304 for interior and industrial design majors. Consent of instructor for all other students. LAB
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This class provides individual students with the opportunity to develop a project of choice based on their interests, design philosophy and builds on the skills acquired from previous semester. Students will conduct in-depth research that may include office planning, retail, sustainability, health care, accessibility, hospitality, exhibit, lighting applications, interior products and technologies. Focus will be on the investigation of a component within a large or complex project, and the development of details, applicable codes and standards, materials and technologies. The nature, scope, and level of complexity of the problem must be prepared in advance by the student prior to the start of the semester and submit in writing to the instructor within the first week of the class. Prerequisite: ENVD 304 and ENVD 306. THE
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This course covers sustainability issues for architecture and interior design. The class focuses on subject matters dealing with the various agencies and organizations of sustainable issues, materials, resources, and building practices/processes/systems that support sustainable design. The course will include lectures, guest speakers, and presentations. Students will be required to produce research, make presentations, papers and a small scale project. In some cases students may work in teams on specific projects. Prerequisite: Open to all University of Kansas students of junior level or higher with permission, but priority will be given to Environmental Design/Interior Design students. LEC
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A continuation of ENVD 408, that will deal with advanced design issues in contract interior design that may include contract documents and budgeting. Prerequisite: ENVD 304, ENVD 306, and ENVD 408. THE
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Lectures by faculty members and guest speakers will introduce the common situations associated with professional interior design practice, including office organization, contracts, procurement and billing procedures, fees, marketing and sales effort, public relations, professional ethics, and environmental ethics in the practice of interior design. Prerequisite: ENVD 307. LEC
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An individual review of the student's portfolio. Topics in presentation techniques, materials, and organization of content will be discussed as related to individual student needs. Prerequisite: ENVD 306. Corequisite: ENVD 408. LAB
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An internship program available to qualified fifth year students. Students will work full-time in an acceptable professional office. Prerequisite: Completion of fourth year requirement and permission of area faculty. FLD
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Individual research. Prerequisite: INTD 606 or equivalent. RSH
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Continuation of INTD 715. RSH
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This course is for students seeking Departmental Honors in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. At the completion of the required four hours of total enrollment, a written and oral report of the research is required. (Same as PHSX 501.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics. IND
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This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their adviser. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as ASTR 503 and PHSX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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An introduction to quantum mechanics, emphasizing a physical overview. Topics should include the formalisms of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the 3-dimensional Schrodinger equation with applications to the hydrogen atom; spin and angular momentum; multi-particle systems of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein particles; time-independent perturbation theory. (Same as PHSX 511.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 290. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing experimental techniques and data analysis, as well as scientific writing and presentation skills. Experiments will explore a range of classical and modern physics topics. (Same as PHSX 516.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, EPHX 316, and EPHX 521. (EPHX 521 may be taken concurrently.) LAB
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Applications of modern mathematical methods to problems in mechanics and modern physics. Techniques include application of partial differential equations and complex variables to classical field problems in continuous mechanics, unstable and chaotic systems, electrodynamics, hydrodynamics, and heat flow. Applications of elementary transformation theory and group theory, probability and statistics, and nonlinear analysis to selected problems in modern physics as well as to graphical representation of experimental data. Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320 or permission of instructor. (Same as PHSX 518.) LEC
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Newton's laws of motion. Motion of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions. Motion of a system of particles. Moving coordinate systems. (Same as PHSX 521.) Prerequisite: PHSX 211 or PHSX 213, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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The properties of electric and magnetic fields, including electrostatics, Gauss' Law, boundary value methods, electric fields in matter, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields in matter, the properties of electric and magnetic dipoles and of dielectric and magnetic materials. (Same as PHSX 531.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, PHSX 521 or special permission, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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A laboratory course that explores the theory and experimental techniques of analog and digital electronic circuit design and measurements. Topics include transient response, transmission lines, transistors, operational amplifiers, and digital logic. (Same as PHSX 536.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223 and MATH 290. PHSX 313 and 316 recommended. LEC
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Different topics will be covered as needed. This course will address topics in physics and astrophysics not covered in regularly offered courses. May be repeated if topic differs. (Same as PHSX 600.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing the application of physical principles to the design of systems for research, monitoring, or control. Topics include the use of microcomputers as controllers, interfacing microcomputers with measurement devices, and use of approximations and/or computer simulation to optimize design parameters, linear control systems, and noise. (Same as PHSX 601.) Prerequisite: Twelve hours of junior-senior credit in physics or engineering, including one laboratory course. LEC
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An introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of problems in physics for which simplifications allowing closed-form solutions are not applicable. Examples are drawn from mechanics, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. (Same as PHSX 615.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, MATH 320 or equivalent, and EECS 138 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of PHSX 521. Lagrange's equations and generalized coordinates. Mechanics of continuous media. Tensor algebra and rotation of a rigid body. Special relativity and relativistic dynamics. (Same as PHSX 621.) Prerequisite: EPHX 521 or PHSX 521. LEC
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An introduction to basic fluid mechanics in which fundamental concepts and equations will be covered. Topics will include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave propagation in fluids, and applications in the areas such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, and geophysics. (Same as PHSX 623.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223, and MATH 290. LEC
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Maxwell's equations, wave propagation, optics and waveguides, radiation, relativistic transformations of fields and sources, use of covariance, and invariance of relativity. Normally a continuation of PHSX 531. (Same as PHSX 631.) Prerequisite: EPHX 531 or PHSX 531. LEC
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Experimental methods in nuclear physics, elementary concepts and simple considerations about nuclear forces, alpha and beta decay, gamma radiation, nuclear structure, and reaction systematics. (Same as PHSX 641.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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Geometric optics. Wave properties of light: interference, diffraction, coherence. Propagation of light through matter. Selected topics in modern optics, e.g., lasers, fibers. (Same as PHSX 655.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 316. LEC
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Properties and interactions of quarks, leptons, and other elementary particles; symmetry principles and conservation laws; broken symmetry; gauge bosons; the fundamental interactions, grand unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; the cosmological implications of elementary particle physics. (Same as PHSX 661.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Development of thermodynamics from statistical considerations. Elementary techniques of calculating thermodynamic properties of systems. Application to classical problems of thermodynamics. Elementary kinetic theory of transport processes. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. (Same as PHSX 671.) Prerequisite: EPHX 611. LEC
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Properties of common types of crystals and amorphous solids. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids. Electrons and holes in energy bands of metals, semiconductors, superconductors, and insulators. (Same as PHSX 681.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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An introduction to radiation processes, thermal processes, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the interstellar medium. (Same as ASTR 691 and PHSX 691.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An overview of topics relevant to gravitation and modern cosmology: special relativity, tensor notation, the equivalence principle, the Schwarzchild solution, black holes, and Friedmann models. Cosmic black body radiation, dark matter, and the formation of large-scale structure. The idea of quantum gravity and an introduction to the current literature in cosmology. (Same as PHSX 693.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Individualized schedule of instruction in one or more skills at appropriate level(s) for students enrolling in AEC courses. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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An advanced listening course emphasizing pronunciation, fluency, comprehension and vocabulary development with a focus on college level content. Students work with and listen to lectures and interviews in order to build skills in understanding oral material, taking notes, discussing content, interviewing, summarizing, and giving presentations. Written work and analysis are also required. Five credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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A course designed to teach advanced students strategies for improving their academic reading and writing. At this level students work to achieve a high level of fluency, vocabulary, and academic skills such as summarizing, responding to test questions, and integrating ideas from several sources. There is strong emphasis on critical reading and writing, and the production of a research paper. Five credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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A communicative course designed to help advanced students acquire sentence- and discourse-level grammar and vocabulary to allow them to express meaning appropriately and accurately in spoken and written English. At this level, students master increasingly complex sentence structures and vocabulary, which they practice in a wide variety of in-class and out-of-class activities. Five credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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Individualized tutorial instruction in one or more skills at appropriate level(s). Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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Practice in a laboratory setting in speaking, listening, reading, writing, or grammar. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LAB
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A content-based capstone course offering advanced instruction in university-level written and spoken materials. Students are required to write response papers, essays, and a research paper; take essay tests; make oral presentations; develop their notetaking skills in lectures; and complete a portfolio of their work for assessment at midterm and semester end. Seven credits in the fall and spring semesters; six credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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A course designed to help very advanced English students polish oral presentation and listening comprehension skills necessary for success in an academic setting. Students work with several topics during the semester, building skills in listening to oral texts, taking notes, discussing content, interviewing, summarizing, and giving presentations. Written work is also required. Four credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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A course intended for graduate students who are in the early stages of their degree programs. Students will read and analyze the structures of texts and improve reading comprehension. In the work on writing, students will first be asked to write summaries and summary critiques and then write investigative reports that set up final research papers or reviews, in which they will be asked to integrate material from readings around a central argument, comment on data or ideas, and critique primary sources. Emphasis will be placed on learning to cite and quote primary materials, organize the content logically, and improve English grammar and usage. In conferences students will receive feedback on the content, organization, and cohesion of papers. Grammar/editing tutorials will be a required component of the course. Four credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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An individualized web-based course designed to help very advanced students analyze and correct errors in writing, and write a passing essay within a time limit by reviewing sentence- and discourse-level grammar and vocabulary. Students write weekly essays in the AEC computer lab, and receive feedback and individualized grammar assignments via e-mail. Students also have several face-to-face conferences with their instructor. Four credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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A course designed to help very advanced students polish strategies for improving their academic reading and writing. There is continued emphasis on increasing fluency, building vocabulary, developing academic skills such as note taking and summarizing. As preparation for college-level academic course work, students work with university course material in a variety of academic areas. Four credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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An individualized course designed to help very advanced students review sentence- and discourse-level grammar and vocabulary to allow them to express meaning appropriately and very accurately in written English. Students write weekly essays in the AEC computer lab, and receive feedback and individualized grammar assignments by email from their instructor. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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Specialized English language and/or orientation courses for students in short-term programs at advanced levels, focused on the use of English in particular fields of study or employment. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in euphonium. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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For graduate students majoring in euphonium. May be repeated for credit. IND
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the Junior/Senior level. course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and non-business majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as IBUS 305.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC
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An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
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Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as HWC 435.) LEC
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Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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European Studies majors will do research and write a substantial paper on a topic in the culture, economy, history, or politics of Europe. Topics will be approved by the European Studies Committee. Students will work with an adviser chosen from among the European Studies faculty and with the European Studies Coordinator. The majority of the students' work will be done independently with their advisers, but students will meet with the European Studies Coordinator several times as a class to report on their progress and present their final drafts. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500 and 15 hours toward the Co-Major. IND
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Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND
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This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC
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A multidisciplinary study of selected literary, scholarly, and creative works produced by those Europeans forced into exile, emphasizing their impact on culture and society both in Europe and in those countries in which the exiles resided. Examples: exile during the Nazi dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945), during Cold War crises (Berlin 1960, Prague 1968). LEC
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An interdisciplinary overview of the Cold War period (1945-1985) focusing on Western European dimensions of the problem, based on the view that the Cold War structured political institutions, cultures, and societies in enduring ways that continue to be relevant today. LEC
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This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND
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Artists and intellectuals in their relation to state and society. This course is designed to introduce students (1) to the role European artists and intellectuals have often played in the arena of politics and (2) to the privileged place cultural production (arts, literature, media) occupies in the formation of various European identities and economies. LEC
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Social, historical, and economic study of Southern European societies with emphasis on modern period. Relevant to the study of European integration and EU enlargement. Consideration of the distinctive southern Mediterranean societies from the perspective of their collective identity as a regional economic and geopolitical bloc. LEC
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This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking Age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as SCAN 570.) LEC
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A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
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Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 144. LEC
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A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
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Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as PCS 565.) LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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