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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An intensive study of the formative backgrounds of the "modern" spirit as it is expressed in imaginative literature. Readings from such influential spokesmen as W. James, Zola, Marx, Darwin, Henry Adams, Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, I.A. Richards, T.S. Eliot, Joyce, Auden, Rilke, Croce, Yeats, Malraux, Freud, Jung, D.H. Lawrence, Sartre, Camus, and Gide. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Different topics in different semesters. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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The study of a wide range of American Indian literature, from various tribes and in a variety of genres. Satisfies the non-western culture course requirement. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Different topics in different semesters. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of the literature written by U.S. Latina/o writers of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and other Central/South American descent, in a variety of genres. Attention is given to the cultural and historical contexts of the literature and to the specificity of particular U.S. Latina/o groups. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of the literature written by African Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present. Emphasis upon specific historical periods in the development of African American literature as well as on a critical analysis of major autobiographical, poetic, and fictional works. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama written by selected writers of the American South from the pre-Civil War period to the present. The course will emphasize the critical analysis of individual texts as well as the cultural and historical context of the works. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of American literary works before 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as AMS 554.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of American literary works after 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as AMS 555.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A Study of English-language poetry of the early twentieth century. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of English-language poetry from the mid-twentieth century to the present. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of selected broad topics in rhetoric and writing, including such topics as the rhetoric of law, the rhetoric of education, persuasion in literature, literacy, and rhetorical genres. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of the structure, history, and varieties of the English language in the United States from the period of colonization to the present. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of a specialized theme or topic in English studies. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Capstone course. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and second-year English requirement or its equivalent, and at least one 300- or 400-level ENGL course; or permission of instructor. LEC
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A broad view of major works and authors in a particular period, genre, or mode. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Practical experience in the use of technical-writing or editing skills in supervised professional settings for which the student normally does not receive pay. A 1-3 hour internship requires 40-120 hours of documented on-site work in one semester (40 hours per credit). Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to a written recommendation from the student's workplace manager, student work logs and self-evaluation, and an oral report. Prerequisite: Advanced Technical Writing I (English 562) and permission of instructor. LEC
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Directed reading and participation in small discussion groups, each formed to consider a specific and limited subject during the semester. Written work will be required, and will be judged on both content and form. The course is part of a departmental program leading to Honors in English. Prerequisite: Admission must be approved by the departmental director of undergraduate studies. LEC
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Independent study, culminating in a substantial essay prepared under the direction of a member of the Department of English who is a specialist in the area of the student's interest. Prerequisite: Admission must be approved by the departmental director of undergraduate studies. LEC
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A survey of the literature of medieval England (in translation). Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A broad view of literary works written between 1485 and 1660. Surveys may be offered with focus on a particular genre (poetry, drama, or prose), historical period (16th- or 17th-century literature), or group of authors (women writers). May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A close reading of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and the minor poems, with illustrative selections of prose. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of literary works from the Restoration and eighteenth century. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of literary works from the British Romantic period. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of literary works from the British Romantic period. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An advanced study of a topic, genre, or area of written and/or oral African literature. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of major works, as well as their cultural and historical contexts. The course also addresses central critical and theoretical debates in the field. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of a major topic of concern to English literature. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the major writings of literary criticism, in their historical context, from Plato and Aristotle to Samuel Johnson. LEC
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An introduction to modern criticism, in its historical context, from Wordsworth and Coleridge to the present. The emphasis will be on major critics and predominant schools. LEC
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Study of a topic (such as mimesis, influence, deconstruction) that is important in critical theory. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. LEC
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A study of the grammatical features of the earliest form of written English, with readings in Old English prose and poetry. LEC
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Prerequisite: An introductory course in Old English. LEC
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Reading of selected works in Middle English (exclusive of the works of Chaucer). LEC
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Intensive study of either the Canterbury Tales or Troilus and Criseyde and the earlier poems. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six hours. LEC
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Intensive study of selected plays. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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Intensive study of texts written between 1485 and 1800. The course may be organized around a particular genre (poetry, prose, drama), historical period (e.g. Elizabethan literature), a major author (e.g. Milton), group of authors (e.g. women writers), or theme (e.g. literature and politics 1660-1800). Students will be expected to read and apply relevant criticism and theory as well as study primary texts. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. LEC
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Intensive study of British literary works of the 1800s. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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Practice in the writing of fiction under the direction of a member of the department working in conjunction with one or more writers in residence. Membership is limited to students who submit, well in advance enrollment, manuscripts showing unusual ability. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Practice in the writing of poetry under the direction of a member of the department working in conjunction with one or more writers in residence. Membership is limited to students who submit, well in advance of enrollment, manuscripts showing unusual ability. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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An intensive course in writing prose fiction and/or verse. Criticism (NEW) of manuscripts through group meetings and individual conferences with the instructor. Membership limited to students who submit manuscripts showing special ability in at least one of the creative writing forms. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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A study of literary works belonging to a particular genre or to multiple genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama etc), either in a particular form (short story, essay, sonnet, etc.), concerned with a particular topic, or illustrative of a particular element of craft (voice, point of view, character development, etc. ). Intended primarily for creative- writing students with an interest in developing their skills at reading as writers. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
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Intensive study of British literary works written during the 20th century. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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Intensive study of topics in modern Irish literature. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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Reading of selected works in modern and contemporary drama. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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This course focuses on or surveys individual writers in the tradition of life writing; or intensively examines topics such as "Autobiography," "Memoir and Diary," "Biography," "Slave Narrative," "Letters," "Personal Essays," or "Autobiographical Fictions." Special emphasis within a topic, such as period, gender, or ethnicity, are possible. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six hours. LEC
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An intensive study of the literatures of Africa and/or African diaspora (people of African descent dispersed around the world). This study will focus on the major characteristics of a particular period, genre, mode, and/or theme in literatures such as African, Caribbean, Afro-Brazilian, African American, African Canadian, Black British. Critical theories pertinent to writers and their work will be covered. Topics may include studies in drama, poetry, or the novel; migration narratives; literature of a particular era, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, or the Black Arts Movement; representations of gender, etc. As topics vary by semester, the course may be repeated for credit. (Same as AAAS 774.) LEC
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Intensive study of North American literary works before 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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Intensive study of North American literary works after 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
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A colloquium for graduate students, sampling the range of poetries and poetics produced in the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. LEC
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This course surveys the field of composition studies, examining major issues and theories in the study of writing. The course may include theories from classical to contemporary rhetoric, composition theory from the twentieth century, and the most current debates in the study of writing. LEC
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A survey of selected critical theories and of the applicability of those theories to the teaching of literature. LEC
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Historical study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics of English; the relation between linguistic and cultural change. LEC
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A study of contemporary English: phonology, morphology, syntax, and usage. The emphasis is structural, but "traditional" grammar is referred to for contrast, example, and clarification. LEC
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Examination of a significant topic in literature or the English language. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
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Acquaintance with resources and practice in techniques that are essential to other graduate courses. Major concerns include the writing and documentation of scholarly papers; basic reference and bibliographical aids; critical approaches to literature and literary historiography; and the place of language and rhetoric in English studies today. LEC
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A survey of major concepts and issues in the study of writing, especially as applied to teaching composition. Practices in writing pedagogy are also discussed, and students' teaching of composition is observed and explored. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 101. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. FLD
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A course concerned primarily with the pedagogy of literature and writing about literature. Includes weekly group meetings, individual conferences, and class visitations. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 102. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. Course graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. FLD
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A course for graduate teaching assistants pursuing the M.F.A. or Ph.D. with emphasis in Creative Writing. Normally taken in the third year. Concerns primarily the pedagogy of creative writing: workshop techniques, approaches to conferencing, revision strategies, and the like. Includes weekly group meetings as well as class visitations and individual conferences. May not be repeated for credit towards graduate degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 801 and 802. FLD
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Examination of selected topics in composition and rhetoric, such as literary studies, genre theory, dialogism, or writing across the curriculum. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 780 or equivalent. LEC
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This course explores theories motivating writing center administration and practice. Students will investigate the multiple functions of writing centers, from writing labs associated with college composition instruction, to decentralized resources for writing faculty teaching writing across the disciplines, to elementary, secondary, and community support centers for writers, to online administrative perspective, design a research study and propose actions such as creating policy, developing curricula, designing materials, or conducting assessments. (Same as LA&S 700.) Prerequisite: LA&S 400, ENGL 400, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Practical experience under professional supervision in editing, theatrical production, and other activities relevant to the completion of an advanced degree in English. FLD
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An independent reading course for students preparing to take the M.A. examination and not otherwise enrolled in the semester of the examination. Does not count in the thirty hours required for the M.A. degree. The grade in the course will be a S or U, as determined by performance on the examination. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Intensive study of one or more theoretical aspects of composition in English (e.g., rhetoric, text grammar, stylistics). Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of the English language in a particular period. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of one or more major critics, of a major critical school, or of a topic important in literary criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Study may center on either Old or Middle English language and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of one or two major authors or of a group of related works. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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One or two authors are read closely, or a group of related works is studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two major figures, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two authors, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two authors or of historical periods or important movements. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, and cultures of Africa and the African Diaspora, such as a concentrated study of one or two authors, a group of significant writers, an historical period or important movement, or an aspect of the literary or cultural scene of Black writing. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
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Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, theory, or a special skill such as analytical bibliography or editing. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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An independent reading course for students preparing to take the Ph.D. comprehensive examination. May normally be taken in the semester or summer session immediately preceding the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken. Does not count toward the residence requirement. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
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Individual work in (a) language, (b) literature, (c) composition, or (d) the teaching of English, by properly qualified graduate students under the direction of appropriate members of the Graduate Faculty as assigned by the Graduate Director. Limited to 6 hours of credit toward the M.A. or Ph.D. degree; only on three-hour enrollment may substitute for a formal course in satisfying a field distribution requirement. Normally offered for only up to three credit hours in any one enrollment. Permission of the supervising faculty member and of the Graduate Director required for enrollment. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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This course will provide an introduction to the University and School of Engineering community and the value and role of higher education in our society, strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community, exploration of the University and School commitment to diversity and multiculturalism, and information about University and School resources and procedures. Prerequisite: Eligible students must have fewer than thirty credit hours from the University of Kansas. LEC
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An introductory level course with emphasis on engineering problem definition, methods simulation, and solution, including approaches to engineering design; engineering units and terminology; engineering disciplines and career areas, and engineering code of ethics. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 180.) Prerequisite: MATH 002. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective Fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 184.) LEC
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Engineering work experience with a recognized engineering organization. The work must be professional in nature and not merely routine. A final summary report must be submitted to the student's major department at the conclusion of each continuous period of employment and may cover more than one sequential semester or summer session. Credit for this course cannot be used toward graduation requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of major department. FLD
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First semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A comprehensive study of the theory, principles, and procedures of ship navigation in coastal and open ocean environment. Includes piloting, triangulation, ocean and tidal currents, navigational astronomy, spherical trigonometry, sight reduction, publications and logs; an introduction to electronic navigation, including theory of wave propagation, hyperbolic and azimuthal systems, doppler, inertial, and satellite systems. (Same as NAVY 300.) LEC
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An examination of the role of technology and its influence on society. The historical development of technology will be traced up to modern times with an emphasis on its relations to the humanities. Attention will be given to the future of different branches of technology and alternative programs for their implementation. (Same as HIST 404.) LEC
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Second semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A study of laws for the prevention of ship collisions; tactical formations and dispositions, relative motion, and maneuvering board. Major portion of the semester is devoted to operations research and analysis, with an introduction to discrete probability theory, game theory, measures of effectiveness, active and passive sonar equations, and review of systems analysis and cost effectiveness. (Same as NAVY 304.) Prerequisite: MATH 111 or higher. LEC
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Courses on special topics of current interest to engineers, such as ethics, engineering economics, engineering practice, communications, teamwork, and professional and career development. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. FLD
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for a bachelors degree in any School of Engineering major, but will appear on the transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. FLD
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The process of planning, organizing, initiating, drafting, and editing engineering documents is covered through writing assignments and discussion. Writing, editing, and publishing the Kansas Engineer magazine. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. FLD
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Meets one hour per week. Planning, preparing, and presenting speeches on a variety of topics throughout the semester. Includes preparing speeches, spontaneous speeches and the evaluation of speeches by other students. Prerequisite: Two English courses and at least junior or senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor. FLD
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A design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Master of Engineering degree. THE
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A major design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Doctor of Engineering degree. THE
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new ventures financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Prerequisite: ENTR 301 and ENTR 302. LEC
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This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Prerequisite: ENTR 303. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of entrepreneurship topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. Learning will be achieved by both study and discussion of key entrepreneurial business issues as well as the critical appraisal of new venture business plans as presented in the text. Readings in entrepreneurship and case studies, contained in the text as well as in video presentations, will be used to illustrate the essential entrepreneurial management issues. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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