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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Advanced instruction and supervised laboratory or fieldwork for doctoral students beyond ABSC 871. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. FLD
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Advanced instruction and supervised laboratory or fieldwork for doctoral students beyond ABSC 872. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Topic and instructor are announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in applied behavioral science or instructor permission. FLD
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Clinical approaches to the therapeutic treatment of children with special emphasis on research findings and laboratory (practicum) experience. A survey of relationship therapies, operant strategies, system approaches, parent education and play therapy by the right therapist for a specific child with a particular problem. (Same as PSYC 976.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. FLD
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The objective of this course is to demystify this process and prepare participants to submit their first independent research grant application. Participants learn about the characteristics of different funding mechanisms and agencies, the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful application strategies, how to turn an initial research idea into a competitive application, ethical issues that influence each stage of the development and submission process, and the nuts and bolts of grant development and management. Specific activities include critiquing an actual NIH grant application, participating in a mock review panel, and developing an actual grant application. LEC
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An advanced seminar for doctoral students. It examines basic and applied research literatures in specialized fields of applied behavioral science. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 930.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. LEC
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Advanced, supervised research in basic or applied behavioral science for doctoral students. The course may focus on any combination of a literature review, research planning and preparation, conducting research, analyzing data, writing research reports, and preparing oral reports of completed research. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 900.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH
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An advanced individual, supervised study of recent research and scholarship for doctoral students. The course emphasizes current scholarship in selected areas of basic and applied behavioral science and its conceptual foundations. Designed for students whose needs cannot be met in other courses. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 933.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH
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An advanced research and readings course for doctoral students. It allows them to concentrate their studies on selected basic and applied problems in behavioral science and carry out independent research. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 931.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. RSH
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An advanced course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to behavioral science for doctoral level students. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. LEC
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Research experience making an original contribution to literature in clinical child psychology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as PSYC 998.) (Formerly HDFL 998.) RSH
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Advanced supervised research that makes an original, empirical contribution to the literature in applied behavioral science leading to a doctoral degree in behavioral psychology. May be repeated. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Formerly HDFL 999.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in behavioral psychology or instructor permission. THE
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Accounting 200 is an introduction to the concepts of business and the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. This course is designed to be of interest to all students regardless of discipline. Prerequisite: MATH 101 and ENGL 101. LEC
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A continuation of Financial Accounting I. A study of concepts of materials, labor, and overhead control; budget administration; cost accounting systems including standard costing; full costing and direct costing; income determination; differential costing; break-even analysis; accounting statement analysis; and use of return on investment as a basis for management decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 200. LEC
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This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting. It will introduce the concepts of business and the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. It will also explore product costing systems and the use of accounting data as a basis for management planning and decision making. (Not open to students with credit in ACCT 200.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course will focus on Accounting as a profession. Prospective and current accounting students will be exposed to a variety of topics. These include, but are not limited to, career options in Accounting, the CPA exam, ethics in the profession, current issues in Accounting, professional standards, the Accounting major, and the five-year Accounting program. Prerequisite: Acct 200 or coenrollment in Acct 200. LEC
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This course provides an overview of how to understand, analyze, and control computerized information systems, and is designed to provide the computer tools and knowledge so that today's business or accounting student will be tomorrow's successful and complete manager, consultant, accountant, and/or auditor. The topics covered in this course will include computer technology, internal control in a computer environment, computer auditing, systems analysis and design, database systems, networking, electronic commerce, and specific systems applications. Hands on experience will be obtained through projects and various software packages. This course will count as an advanced business elective. Prerequisite: ACCT 201 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements with emphasis on the principles of revenue recognition, matching revenues and related costs, and the determination of proper balance sheet valuations of assets and liabilities. The asset side of the balance sheet is the primary emphasis though the entire financial statements are used in examples throughout the course. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ACCT 303. LEC
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An intermediate accounting course with emphasis on interpretation of general-purpose financial statements and the related disclosure notes. Includes understanding interrelationships among the various financial statements and analyzing the effects of transactions on the financial statements. Common and significant accounts/transactions will be analyzed, especially those relating to the financing and equity sections of the financial statements. Not open to accounting majors with credit in ACCT 320. Enrollment restricted. Prerequisite: FIN 310. LEC
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An analysis of cost systems and their application in the determination, analysis and control of manufacturing and distribution costs. Emphasis is on managerial planning and control. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A study of the major concepts related to taxation with emphasis on the federal income tax for individuals including the implications of being a sole proprietor, partner of a partnership, and a corporate shareholder. Major topics covered include: different types of taxes; formation of the tax law; gross income; deductions; the tax formula; tax credits; filing status; tax treatment for capital gains and losses; and selected nontaxable transactions. Prerequisite: ACCT 320. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to basic concepts of income tax and how the tax law is formed. While tax problems of an individual are considered, emphasis is placed on tax factors to consider when conducting a business either as a single proprietor, corporation, or partnership. Not open to students with credit in ACCT 330. This course is for non-accounting majors. Prerequisite: ACCT 201. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of accounting topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A continuation of the study of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) underlying the preparation and interpretation of general-purpose financial statements. The focus of this course is on the liability and equity sections of the balance sheet, including such topics as loans, bonds, leases, pensions, accounting for income taxes, equity transactions, employee stock options, earnings per share, and cash flows. Application of many of the authoritative accounting pronouncements is illustrated. Prerequisite: ACCT 320. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; approval of the Area Director. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The fundamental concepts of audit risk, evidence accumulation and materiality are applied to financial statement audits using established accounting principles as the criterion for evaluating fair presentation. Audit objectives and procedures are studied in relation to the opinion which the auditor expresses on clients' financial statements. Financial statement audits are compared with other types of engagements performed by public accountants, and with other types of audits, such as compliance and operational audits. Prerequisite: ACCT 311 and ACCT 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Introduction to taxation for corporations, partnerships, S corporations and limited liability companies. The course will also include coverage of property transactions, methods of accounting, tax-related investment decisions, and selected tax issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 330. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit from ACCT 599. ACCT 599 may count as an Accounting elective for students majoring in Accounting. Prerequisite: Approval of the internship; two of the following: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Financial accounting provides information to decision-makers external to the business, such as investors and lenders. The course describes the process through which economic information is captured, validated, and distributed externally in the form of financial statements. It also covers the contents of the major financial statements, focusing on how the various accounts are defined and measured and how the information can be used by external decision-makers. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 320. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Managerial accounting provides information to decision-makers within the business, such as supervisors and executives. The course describes the process through which economic information is captured and distributed internally as budgets and other reports. It also covers various uses of managerial accounting information for internal decision-making. These uses include planning for profitable operations, determining costs of products and services, and evaluating performance within an organization. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 325. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course covers topics in intermediate-level financial accounting and financial statement analysis. Accounting topics are taught from an external decision-maker's perspective. The course is intended to help students read and understand complex financial statements, and to extract key financial information from a mass of detail. Topics will vary over time but can include analyses of cash flows, quality of earnings, profitability, risk, and the reporting and analysis of intangible assets. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 320, ACCT 410, ACCT 721, or ACCT 722. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course covers topics in intermediate-level financial accounting and financial statement analysis. Accounting topics are taught from an external decision-maker's perspective. The course is intended to help students read and understand complex financial statements, and to extract key financial information from a mass of detail. Topics will vary over time but can include financial reporting of various liabilities, derivatives and hedging, investments and acquisitions. Topics also can include forecasting financial statements, and valuation of common stock using accounting data. Not open to MAcc students or students with credit in ACCT 320, ACCT 410, ACCT 721, or ACCT 722. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to basic concepts of income tax law with emphasis on business taxation. The factors to consider when conducting a business as a single proprietorship, corporation, S corporation, or partnership are analyzed. Prerequisite: ACCT 701 or equivalent. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A series of topics related mainly to financial accounting for corporations. Includes accounting for acquisitions and consolidations, asset impairments and derivative instruments. Also includes accounting for partnership equity. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is intended to help students understand how perceived financial reporting problems are addressed via the financial standard setting process. This includes the roles of standard setting agencies, accounting theory, and political and economic pressures. The course also considers the potentially opposing reporting preferences of managers, investors and analysts. Topics will vary over time but can include convergence of U.S. and international standards, recent and proposed changes to standards, and underlying trends in standard setting (such as increased use of fair value measurements, and principles-based standards). Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines the economic drivers, competing interests, and regulatory institutions that determine accounting policy choice and the societal role of accounting. By the end of the course, students will have developed a cognitive framework that will enable them to identify and understand the forces that shape financial reporting, firms' reporting decisions, the behavior of financial regulatory bodies, interactions among agents in the capital markets, the behavior of public accounting firms, as well as other relevant issues. The end-goal of this course is to develop in the participants a more advanced and sophisticated perspective of the economic, political, ethical, and social role of accounting. Prerequisite: ACCT 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Through judicious use of quantitative methods including statistical decision theory, this course provides a conceptual analysis of several prominent managerial accounting topics. This course is intended to assist both public accountants and management accountants to understand management decision-making processes and information requirements thereof. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A course designed to develop one's ability to use the research tools available and provide comprehensive coverage of the many aspects of tax research. Emphasis is placed on locating authorities, solving tax problems, and communicating the results. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Corequisite: ACCT 545. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A study of federal income taxation for corporations, subchapter S corporations, and partnerships. The tax problems associated with formation, operation, distributions, redemptions, reorganizations, and selected special topics will be analyzed. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program, ACCT 545 and ACCT 731 or concurrent enrollment. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A study of the fundamentals of Federal estate and gift taxation, the income taxation of estates and trusts, and various aspects of family tax planning. Prerequisite: ACCT 545 and admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Explores various academic approaches to fraud to include factors learned from other disciplines such as sociology and psychology. Students will review the vast body of knowledge gained by practitioners throughout the world and will attempt to apply these factors to the prevention of financial statement and occupational (employee) fraud. Some of the topics covered include: skimming transactions, identity fraud, computer schemes, money laundering, bribery and kickbacks, and corporate espionage. Prerequisite: ACCT 543 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Current auditing philosophy, standards, techniques, and professional judgment are extensively investigated and related to auditing activities. Special emphasis is given to the design of audit programs in relation to the client's system of internal control and the effect of such factors as relative risk and materiality. Other topics include auditors' legal liability, professional ethics, the impact of electronic data processing and statistical techniques, and the preparation of auditors' reports and qualifications therein. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Students learn how to perform the risk assessments that auditors use to plan a top-down, risk-based assurance engagement. Using auditing standards and internal control frameworks as a guide, students learn how auditors (a) evaluate market conditions, industry practices, and client business activities to assess the risk of financial misstatement, (b) search potential misstatements by analyzing patterns of fluctuations in related financial statement accounts, and (c) assess the effectiveness of internal controls that protect technology-driven financial reporting processes from errors and irregularities. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is an extension of the study of basic financial accounting practices to include specialized industries that have particular or varied forms of GAAP applications and reporting which are not normally covered in basic financial accounting courses. Topics include accounting for banking, retail, insurance, not-for-profit entities, oil and gas, and financial institutions. Typically, this course should be taken by students in the audit track of the MAcc Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAcc program. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Internships provide opportunities for students to combine their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Accounting internships allow students to explore career pathways in accounting, further their professional growth, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the accounting internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre- and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the Director of the Internship Program prior to the internship experience. Students may not receive more than three hours of internship credit. Enrollment restricted and by permission only. FLD
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of accounting to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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(S) Continuance of BUS 740 with emphasis upon the economic and social factors affecting the development of accounting thought. Each student will make both oral and written presentations of his/her original investigation and analysis of contemporary controversial issues. Prerequisite: Consent of PhD adviser. LEC
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(V) The objective of this course is to foster a student's conception and resolution of substantive issues in the management accounting area. Thus, the course will provide exposure to selected contemporary research topics. Representative topics that will be discussed are: concept of information, information economics, accounting information for planning and control, design of accounting information systems, variance analysis, and cost allocations. Prerequisite: Consent of PhD adviser. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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Individual instruction in vocal and/or instrumental accompanying. Open to junior, senior, and graduate pianists with permission of instructor. IND
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A class in the performance of vocal and instrumental accompaniment. Prerequisite: Completion of ACMP 527 or permission of instructor. IND
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Individual instruction in vocal and or instrumental accompanying. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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For graduate students majoring in accompanying. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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A course in which major vocal and instrumental works are studied with vocal or instrumental participants. LEC
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Visiting professionals discuss various aspects of Design based upon their own special areas of expertise. The series is mandatory for all Design majors. Must be repeated for at least 4 (or 5) credit hours depending on your major. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory. LAB
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A collaborative studio across all Design Department areas of study. Students of the different areas will be organized into work groups and conduct in-depth research, investigate new problem solving methodologies, develop new applications and working knowledge of specialized subjects. Prerequisite: Junior level or higher standing in Design or Architecture or with permission of the instructor. LEC
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Students develop professional skills and problems solving with an applied and relevant design employer's office. Supervision by faculty and a professional designer, designated and approved by the faculty in the area is mandatory. Graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Junior level or higher standing in the Design Department. FLD
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Students will participate in a Design focused study abroad program. Students are evaluated based on their participation, notes and sketches, as well as their final project inspired from their destination. Prerequisite: Junior level or higher standing in Design or with permission of the instructor. LAB
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Survey of design history from 1800 to present with emphasis on graphics, architecture, industrial and interior design movements, individuals and their influences. Prerequisite: Junior standing in the department. LEC
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A study of different topics in different semesters in a special area of interest to a staff member and suitable qualified students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department. LAB
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Comprehensive examination of a complex design problem from the point of view of the various specializations. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department. LEC
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A study of current problems in design or crafts with an emphasis on research. Special problems proposals must be discussed with and approved by the instructor and adviser prior to enrollment in the course. A student may not take more than six credit hours of special problems in any one semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing in department. IND
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The study of human factors principles and guidelines are fundamental to interaction design. In this course, these principles will be illustrated and applied to real-world design projects/problems. Human physical and cognitive capabilities, computer-human interface and systems properties, interaction design methods, and the physical and socio-cultural environment will be considered. Fundamental issues in human-centered systems, basic research methods, including statistics and literature searches, will be included. Open to all university students. Graduate students will meet concurrently with INDD 510 and receive additional course work. LEC
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This course will cover the principles of design thinking, design processes, design strategies and methods, including techniques and tools for the development of human-technology interfaces. Abstract through concrete representation methods and techniques will be applied to interaction design projects/problems. Information collection and analysis methods, scenario and prototyping methods, evaluation methods (empirical), creativity methods, and task-oriented method (non-empirical) will also be considered. Methods common to design-related disciplines in the social sciences, business, architecture, communication studies and engineering are integrated. Graduate students will meet concurrently with INDD 512 and receive additional work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor for all non-design students. LEC
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Business products, services and environments are often intermingled in ways that require more holistic ways of thinking and development. A challenge of service innovation is to design with an understanding of the many dimensions of human experience and satisfaction. This course elaborates how, where, when, and why design can enhance the value of business services. Theory, methods, and practice aspects of services design are presented. LEC
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Comparative studies of various areas of specialization in design. Repeat for credit to a maximum of six credit hours. LEC
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Group critique of individual research/artwork and discussion of professional practices and contemporary issues in crafts and art. Open to all craft area graduate students. Repeat for credit to a maximum of six credit hours. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. LEC
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Research reading and presentation of reports on specific subjects related to the students major area of specialization. Required of all graduate students. RSH
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An in-depth study of current problems in design or crafts with an emphasis on research. Special problems proposals must be discussed with and approved by the instructor and graduate adviser prior to enrollment in the course. RSH
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A rapidly changing marketplace demands business strategy that is rooted in the dynamics of human culture, society, and psychology. Design thinking directly engages such factors and is, thus, well suited to help organizations formulate effective, versatile and strategic brands. This class focuses on strategic design analysis as a means to promote innovation in core brand development and extension into new applications and product categories. By aligning design with engineering, marketing, advertising, packaging, and service, business can innovate new sources of market value and deliver a more powerful brand messages. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor for all non-design students. LEC
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Design Management has been described as "applied innovation" or the methodical capturing of talent and resources available inside and outside an organization to create valuable new offerings, brands, and business models. This course explores the design functions in business as a means to solve difficult challenges and develop new market-facing opportunities. Subjects include brand value creation, differentiation, coordination, and transformation. Numerous cases will be discussed. LEC
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Most organizations are imaginatively challenged and experience difficulty innovating and marketing new concept offerings. Conventional methods spotting and validating new opportunities often lack the persuasive power necessary for change to occur. Scenario-based design and simulation offers ways to vividly representing a future that is different from the past. This course presents theory, methods and practice aspects of design scenario construction and simulation. LEC
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As companies struggle with the demands of increasing consumer, intense competition and downward price pressures, there is a corresponding increase in the demand for more innovative business models and higher-value offerings. These forces have significantly broadened the strategic scope of design. Advanced, multi-disciplinary design teams are being engaged early to help guide new business and product development efforts. Why, where, when, and how this is done in order to deliver on the promise of innovation is the subject of this course. Prerequisite: ADS 750 or with consent of instructor. LEC
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Interaction Design is about creating products, services or environments that offer significant experiential value to people and economic value to organizations. This course engages the comprehensive subject of design for human experience. Building on the gamut of human factors and design methods knowledge, this offers hands-on experience in the research, analysis, modeling and simulation of original and experientially compelling design solutions. Prerequisite: ADS 710, ADS 712 or with consent of instructor. LEC
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In a science of design, the study of "human designers" is as important as the study of designed artifacts or design tools. Since the beginning of research in Design Cognition, many empirical studies have opened up our understanding or human designers and the ways they design. While design is largely a mental activity, it interacts strongly with heterogeneous external representations. It encompasses problem definition and solving, analogical mappings, mental imaging and other mental processes. It requires team coordination and is situated in a cultural milieu that defines roles and modes of behavior. As such, distributed cognition, situated cognition, and social cognition - all have become relevant to the understanding of design cognition. The structure of a design task, the mental representation of design form and behavior, the structure of design teams, and the associated concepts of design cognition will be the subject of the course. LEC
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Studies directed to development of a thesis plan. Required of all graduate students. Offered in fall semester only. Graded S or F. LEC
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Graduate students only. Must hold an assistant instructor or teaching appointment. Credit earned does not satisfy any credit requirement for a degree. Graded S or U. FLD
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Group discussion and presentations on timely industry topics. Topics will be substantial, bridging relevant program subjects and professional area boundaries. May be repeated for up to six credit hours in subsequent semesters. LEC
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Approaches to producing original design research. Methods, resources, topics and projects are discussed and evaluated. May be repeated for up to six credit hours in subsequent semesters. LEC
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For guidance refer to Design department graduate guidelines. THE
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One hour of academic credit is given upon the awarding of the private pilot's license by the Federal Aviation Administration. Required documentation includes a letter from the F.A.A. designated examiner giving the check ride and a copy of the private license. The Department of Aerospace Engineering provides no ground or flight instruction. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Aerospace Engineering students only, with consent of instructor. IND
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Three hours of academic credit is given for the successful completion of the F.A.A. private pilot's written examination. Required documentation is a copy of the written score. Available only to Aerospace Engineering transfer students as a course substitute for AE 245. IND
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Basic systems of an aerospace vehicle, meteorology, vehicle performance, navigation and safety. Specific examples emphasize general aviation. Open enrollment. Corequisite: MATH 121. LEC
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This is a required course for all aerospace engineering majors each fall semester. Topics of importance and new developments are discussed by aerospace industry representatives and representatives of F.A.A., D.O.T., D.O.D., N.A.S.A., related sciences, and engineering disciplines. A forum for student activities at all levels. Technical films. Open enrollment. LEC
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for the bachelors degree in Aerospace Engineering but will appear on the official transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Completion of freshman year. FLD
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Study of fundamental aspects of fluid motions and basic principles of gas dynamics with application to the design and analysis of aircraft. Open enrollment. Corequisite: CE 201 or CE 301. LEC
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Introduction to astronautical engineering. The history of astronautics, including rocketry and space flight. Fundamentals of astronautics, including space environment, astrodynamics and the analysis and design of spacecraft systems. Design, construction and launch of a prototype earth-satellite using a high-altitude balloon. Prerequisite: MATH 122. Corequisite: A course in computer programming. LEC
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for the bachelors degree in Aerospace Engineering but will appear on the official transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Completion of Sophomore year. FLD
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Development of skills in depicting aerospace vehicles and their components and subsystems for the purpose of illustration, design, and analysis using traditional and modern (Computer Aided Design) drafting tools. LEC
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Review and hands-on laboratory experiments with basic electronic elements (resistors, capacitors, conductors, transistors, linear circuits, logic devices, and integrated circuits). Overview and hands-on laboratory experiments using various experimental techniques available to the aerospace engineers (pressure probes, thermocouples, strain gauges, hot-wire anemometer, laser Doppler velocimeter, and flow visualization techniques). Prerequisite: AE 445 and EECS 318. LAB
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Academic credit is given for the successful completion of advanced flight training beyond the private pilot rating. One hour is given for each of the following: commercial, instrument rating, certified flight instructor. The Aerospace Engineering Department provides no ground or flight instruction. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Open enrollment. Prerequisite: AE 241. IND
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Study of airfoil and wing aerodynamics, component drag, static and special performance, and maneuvers of aircraft. Open enrollment. Prerequisite: AE 345, CE 301. LEC
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for the bachelors degree in Aerospace Engineering but will appear on the official transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Completion of junior year. FLD
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Analysis and design of aerospace structures from the standpoint of preliminary design. Deflection and stress analysis of structural components, including thin-walled beams and built-up (semimonocoque) structures. Material failure of highly stressed components, including connections. Buckling of thin-walled beams and semimonocoque structures. Durability and damage tolerance strategies for aerospace structures to avoid corrosion, fatigue, and fracture. Prerequisite: CE 310. LEC
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Stress and deflection analysis of aerospace structures using the finite element method. Introduction to work-energy principles, including Castigliano's Theorems, for the analysis of statically indeterminate structures. Rod, beam, shaft, membrane, and plate finite elements. Prerequisite: AE 507. LEC
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Indeterminate structures, principle of virtual work, Castigliano's theorems, displacement method of finite element analysis; rod, beam, shaft, and membrane elements; analysis of aerospace structures with the finite element method. Prerequisite: AE 507. LEC
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