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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A study of the principles used by the engineer in managing a technology-based enterprise. Topics include planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in an engineering curriculum or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Advanced or experimental work of a specialized nature representing unique or changing needs and resources in engineering management. RSH
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This course is intended to introduce the student to the basic concepts of management and motivation for the engineering manager and general behavior of technical organizations. This course presents a history of the schools of management thought through the modern research that began the participative management movement. The course will investigate classical motivational theories and management style principles. The student will perform research to determine how their employer or clients apply these theories. LEC
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Applied statistical methods to engineering systems will be introduced in this course for analyzing engineering and management systems. Emphasis will be given to applied regression analysis, analysis of variance, analysis of time dependence by smoothing, Bayes method, time series analysis, auto-regressive moving averages and forecasting model. Prerequisite: Skills in probability, statistics, and computer application. LEC
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This course focuses on the impact of technology on society. Techniques of technology forecasting such as Delphi, cross-impact analysis, trend projection, decision trees, and scenarios are discussed. Case studies of technology assessments are presented. Each student is asked to conduct a preliminary technology assessment which is a systematic study of the effects on society which may occur when a technology is introduced or modified. Prerequisite: Elementary skills in statistics, computer programming, and linear algebra. LEC
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Principles and theories of business development and marketing as applicable to professional engineering and architectural practices. LEC
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Management of technology and technological change through innovation, imitation, and obsolescence; planning, organizing, motivation, and control for innovation; organizational climate and its effects on innovative ideas and entrepreneurship; project/product decisions and R&D strategies in small and large companies; innovation in multinational corporations. LEC
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A study of finance including financial planning and management in technological based organizations. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, present value of financial markets, capital budgeting, taxes, investment decisions, replacement decisions, cash flow budgets, and sources of capital. LEC
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This course is an introduction to labor relations and human resources, including employment practices in unionized and non-union organizations. The course will examine labor relations, human relations and collective bargaining with emphasis on the negotiation and administration of labor agreements. Included will be a survey of the historical, legal, and structural environments that influence the collective bargaining process. Research topics focus on some of the most important issues in the workplace: protecting jobs, increasing productivity, computerization, worker participation, expanding and declining labor markets, and new methods of decision making in the human resources field. LEC
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The overwhelming challenge that faces the U.S. today is the need to regain its competitive position in the world marketplace. This course offers a broad view of Quality Management in that it focuses on the managerial aspects of quality, rather than just the technical. For example, students will learn the Malcolm Baldridge award criteria which focuses on leadership, data analysis, human resources, quality assurance, quality results, and customer satisfaction. In addition, a review of the theory and approaches of the major quality leaders such as Deming, Juran, and Crosby will be covered. Practical applications of TQM concepts in a technological environment will be stressed throughout the course. LEC
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Includes the study of theories, tests for, and objectives of engineering and management ethics. Explores personal values. Measures personality profile and preferred communication style for each student. Includes management of stress, time, and career. Each student prepares career and personal development plans. Managerial writing and communication skills are developed through weekly projects including report and proposal preparation, internal correspondence concerning praise and reprimand, and organizational policy preparation. Interpersonal and nonverbal communication styles are studied. Relies heavily on instructor-assisted peer mediation of topics after introduction of constructive techniques of interpersonal communication. LEC
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This course emphasizes the use of general system theory, classical optimization and optimality conditions, model development, and theory and application of mathematical programming, to include: linear programming, dynamic programming, queuing models, integer and non-linear programming, and introduction to decision analysis. Prerequisite: Elementary skills in linear algebra, probability, calculus, and computer application. LEC
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Methods of developing, implementing, and using computer simulations for management processes such as inventory control, waiting lines, project monitoring, and capital investment decisions are covered. Extensive use is made of simulation languages and interactive graphic-supported gaming and decision analysis. Engineering systems and chemical processes are studied under deterministic and stochastic conditions. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. LEC
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This course covers: legal doctrines relating to owners, design professionals, and contractors; sources of law, forms of association, and agency; contracts, including formation, rights and duties, interpretation, performance problems, disputes, and claims; standards of care and the management of construction claims; duties and obligations of the design professional, the owner, and the contractor; surety bonds and insurance. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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Includes planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling design projects. Treats those topics from viewpoints of profit, cost control, client satisfaction, and project team human relations. Also covers delegation, motivation, team building, performance reviews, conflict resolution, and group dynamics. Presents the project manager's job from an augmented model of the Blake-Mouton grid. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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The elements of the accounting cycle are defined so as to help the student understand the process from the balance sheet for the last period through the journal, ledger, income statement, trial balance and an adjusted balance for the current period. There is a heavy emphasis on the definition and significance of accounting terminology. The communication interfaces between engineering managers and the controller's office are examined as are recent developments in cost accounting. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in architectural, construction, engineering or technology management, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of the economic feasibility of competing engineering projects including the application of break-even analysis, decisions under uncertainty, decision trees, stochastic models, risk vs. return, and forecasting. A study of the financial figures of merit used to evaluate competing engineering projects including the DuPont rate of return method, the accounting rate of return, the operating return method, return on equity, earnings per share, margin on sales, selling price of stock, corporate credit rating, total sales, market share, market entry, and proforma year-end statements. A study of the strategic evaluation of a project including the proposed product or service, the organization, the environment, and the venture in general. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.S. Engineering Management program or consent of instructor, EMGT 806, a course in applied statistics. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to all aspects of managing a project within a company or organization. The entire project life cycle will be covered from inception to close-out, and many practical considerations will be discussed including material procurement, working with contractors and consultants, selecting software, and managing the project team. The course will focus on how to manage project scope, schedule budget, and resources using personal computer software. A semester project is required presenting an example of project management or investigating some aspect of project management in detail. LEC
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Basic principles of marketing as applicable to engineering managers in the production- or operations-based enterprise. Includes a broad overview of the major components of marketing (competition, product, price, promotion, and distribution). Also details the integration of those components into the marketing plan. The students will develop a group marketing plan for an agreed-upon product. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate program in engineering or Pittsburgh State's technology management program. LEC
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A capstone course for the program which provides an integration of the material presented in the other courses through the utilization of several engineering management case studies. Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours in the Engineering Management program. LEC
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A problem in engineering management, the satisfactory completion of which satisfies the project requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Management. THE
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This is a first course at the graduate level introducing the formal methods and processes in bringing complex systems into being and improving existing systems. Systems include both products and services. Emphasis is placed on: the definition of customer needs, the entire life cycle of systems, and introduction to formal specification methods, the value to cost ratio and the management of the systems engineering process. LEC
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This course investigates the area of managing software development and presents the management process as a means of optimizing business considerations and project demands. Uncertainties in product/service specifications, technology risks, cost and delivery requirements impact the management functions. Cost and schedule estimation techniques are presented together with project planning, risk control and measurement technologies. The techniques presented in this course are directly applicable to management in other industry segments. Guest speakers are used to demonstrate applications in this course. LEC
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This course is intended to bring the student up to date on developments in the field of information technology (IT) and to prepare the student to apply those technologies in the workplace. To this end, the course is divided into two components. First, current hardware, software, and networking technologies will be presented. Topics include relational databases, object oriented design and programming, client-server technologies, the Internet, and emerging communication technologies. Second, approaches to evaluating and implementing the range of information technology alternatives available to business will be presented. Topics in this area include software development, management and evaluation, IT project management, information integrity and security, and the effects of IT on people and the organization. LEC
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This course provides a survey of the environmental regulations, environmental problems, and environmental solutions that must be dealt with by engineering managers regardless of their function or industry. A historical perspective on the environment is presented followed by discussion of pollution generation (sources), transportation, fate, and effects. The quantity and quality of various types of pollutants emitted to various media and the risk posed by these pollutants is analyzed. The regulatory process is examined from the perspective of the legislator, the regulator, the regulated, the engineer, and the public. LEC
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Management of competitive intelligence and security in business strategic planning is a first course at the graduate level that introduces the formal methods, concepts, and processes of competitive intelligence and security which are vital to both strategic business planning and day-to-day business operations. This course provides access to the tools used to identify what is happening in the business environment including legislation, economics, regulatory changes, competition, customers, etc. that affect a business' strategy and operations. Further, these tools are applied to determining what will likely happen in the future and how to use those forecasts to optimize strategic and operational plans. LEC
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Graduate-level investigation requiring original, independent research on problems or subjects of immediate interest to a student or faculty member. Intended to develop a student's capability in coordinating two or more of the following: technology, finance, economics, applied mathematics, and managerial communication. EMGT 860 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of four hours in the degree program. Prerequisite: Approval of an outline of the proposed project by the instructor and the program director. RSH
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This course develops the rationale and need for the integration of manufacturing systems, and deals with the multitude of practical problems involved with manufacturing systems integration. Topics covered include intelligent manufacturing subsystems and vendor-specific islands of automation, on-line and off-line information sources, and end users of information in the manufacturing enterprise. Engineering details covered include the types of communication links available between systems, communication standards, network and protocol alternatives, and hardware platform alternatives. Management concepts covered include the top-down design/bottom-up implementation approach to system integration, long-range planning and management of integration projects, reliability and security issues, and human factors. LEC
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This course provides the student with up-to-date information of the management of manufacturing operations. Emphasis is on quantitative methods for designing and analyzing manufacturing processes, simulation of manufacturing processes, and recent paradigms in manufacturing including just-in-time production, synchronous manufacturing, and agile manufacturing. A semester project is required covering some aspect of operations management in detail. LEC
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A review of the basic skills of written English, with emphasis on sentence-level grammar. Recommended for all students who score 16 or below on the ACT English test. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Instruction and practice in writing in a variety of rhetorical contexts, including academic ones. LEC
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Builds upon the instruction in writing of ENGL 101, emphasizing critical thinking through careful, thoughtful reading and writing. Also instructs in the evaluation and use of secondary sources. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of significant works of world literature. The primary aims are to develop reading and writing skills and to introduce the students to works of literature drawn from a variety of genres and historical periods. For ELIGIBILITY, see section "Placement in English." LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in English. course work is completed through a KU study abroad program. Available only to KU study abroad participants. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Does NOT fulfill any part of the Freshman-Sophomore requirement. LEC
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In-depth reading and writing on a significant topic, theme, or genre. Includes a variety of textual types or a range of historical periods. Continued practice in critical reading and writing. May include but will not be limited to writing in literary genres. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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Study of a major movement, topic, or theme in literature and culture. The primary aims are to further develop reading and writing skills and to consider significant cultural and artistic issues. For ELIGIBILITY, see section "Placement in English." LEC
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In-depth reading of and writing about prose fiction with emphasis on critical analysis of a variety of narrative types from different historical periods. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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In-depth reading of and writing about poetry with emphasis on critical analysis of a variety of forms and techniques used in poems from different historical periods. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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Study of plays selected to familiarize the student with dramatic masterpieces and with the drama as a literary type. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the nature and function of literature, emphasizing Biblical, Classical, and other major cultural traditions and their influence on British and American literature. Some ancient and modern works will be studied in conjunction. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. (Same as GINS 305.) LEC
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Study of significant problems in literary interpretation and methodology, in which basic critical principles and approaches are systematically examined and applied. These approaches might include, but are not limited to, feminism, Marxism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of five or more significant novels representative of developments in the British novel of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Outstanding works of British literature, from the earliest times to the close of the eighteenth century, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention to the characteristics of the various periods of English literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Outstanding works of British literature, from 1800 to the present, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention to the characteristics of the various periods of English literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program, an interdisciplinary program conducted with other humanities departments. British literature is studied in the context of visits to relevant sites such as London, the Lake District, and Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement; approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC
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Outstanding works of American literature, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention paid to the characteristics of the various periods of American literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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From the beginnings to 1865, with emphasis on the major writers and movements. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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From 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the major writers and movements. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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The study of British and American literature, emphasizing important figures and movements since World War I. On occasion, the study of literature will be enriched with an investigation of other arts, such as music, film, and painting. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of one or more recent British and/or American authors. (Different authors in different semesters.) May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of recent best sellers or other works of popular interest. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Saharan Africa. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. (Same as AAAS 332.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and one 200-level English course or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of major twentieth-century playwrights and theatre groups, to be selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement (ENGL 211 preferred) or its equivalent. LEC
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Selected readings with emphasis on the Canterbury Tales. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of ten to fourteen of Shakespeare's plays. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of one or two major British and/or American authors. Different authors in different semesters. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An examination of Jewish American literature and culture from the 17th century to the present. Materials may include a broad range of literary genres as well as folklore, music, film, and visual art. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An historical survey of literature by U.S. Latina/o writers of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Central/South American descent. Various genres, including oral forms such as corridos as well as novels, poetry, essays, and autobiographical writing, will be considered. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to prominent works of African-American literature from the 18th century to the present as well as to the basic approaches to study and principles of this body of work, including its connection with African sources. Literature will include a wide variety of genres, and course materials may be supplemented by folklore, music, film, and visual arts. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Reading, analysis, and discussion of fiction, poetry, and drama from the Caribbean, including a small selection of Spanish, French, and Dutch Antillean works in translation. (Same as AAAS 333.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and one 200-level course in English or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of literature by authors from one or more ethnic groups within the U.S., including but not limited to Asian American, African American, American Indian, Jewish American, Italian American, U.S. Latina/o. Different topics in different semesters. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of narrative techniques and practice in the writing of fiction. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of prosody and practice in the writing of verse. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. ENGL 210 is recommended. LEC
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An introduction to the practice of writing and evaluating scripts for film. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the practice of writing and evaluating scripts for stage. Prerequisite: ENGL 211, Introduction to Drama, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the literary techniques of nonfiction and practice in the writing of one or more of the genre's subtypes, such as the personal and familiar essay, the memoir, New Journalism, and natural history. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A course in traditional English grammar for students who wish to understand and be able to analyze English sentence structure. Students might apply the course to studies of style (their own or other authors'), rhetorical analysis, literary interpretation, or teaching. This course may be offered in either lecture or online format. Prerequisite: Completion of English 101 and 102 or their equivalent. LEC
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The principles of effective composition, as applied to a specific topic such as critical writing, expository writing, pre-legal English, book reviewing, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Principles of writing for specific professional contexts, which might include such areas as business writing, legal writing, and literary or arts reviewing, etc. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 102 or its equivalent. LEC
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Introduces students to the principles of technical communication. Students learn to organize, develop, write, and revise various technical documents (e.g., letters, manuals, presentations, proposals, reports, resumes, websites) often needed in business, engineering and scientific settings. Includes an introduction to technical-writing software. This course fulfills the prerequisite for English 562 and 564. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102 (or equivalent) or completed undergraduate degree. LEC
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Introduces students to rhetoric and composition, a field that investigates questions about the nature, processes, teaching and historical, social and cultural contexts of writing. Students survey the themes, debates, and trends that inform the work of scholars in this field. Students also become acquainted with the historical traditions of discourse instruction, and the relevance of those traditions to our current understandings of writing. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the history of the English language, with special attention to general structural changes throughout its history, especially changes in vocabulary and meaning, and past influences of other languages upon present usage. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the English language, its historical development, and its grammatical structure. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of a specialized theme or topic in English studies. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and second-year English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Students explore theories and strategies of teaching and tutoring writing across academic disciplines. They learn more about themselves as writers as they build a repertoire of writing techniques useful in their studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. By observing and consulting in the writing center, they understand how reflection leads to responsible/responsive and engaged practice. (Same as LA&S 400.) LEC
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Wide reading in the great literature of the past and present suitable for children: folktales and epics, mythology, modern fantasy, fiction, poetry. Emphasis on extending the student's background and developing critical judgment. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A study of the literary treatment of a particular aspect of British and/or American society. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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This class meets one day a week throughout the semester and includes a nine-day visit to London over the spring break period. Students spend the early part of the semester selecting special interests, researching places to visit and study, and exchanging information. After the trip, students compile and publish a journal entitled "The London Review", which is comprised of essays, photos, art work, and other reflections about their experience in London. Prerequisite: Admission to University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Work for advanced majors in fields or on topics not covered in course work. May be repeated for a total of up to six hours. Does not satisfy specific course requirements for the English major. May be counted as part of the total junior-senior credit hours required. Prerequisite: Completion of three junior-senior courses in English and consent of instructor. IND
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Practical experience in the use of English skills in supervised academic or professional settings. Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to the written recommendation provided by the supervisor to the director. Prerequisite: Completion of three junior-senior courses in English and consent of director. FLD
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The development of science fiction as a literary genre, and as a literature of ideas for a future-oriented society. LEC
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Science and technology offer many benefits to individuals and to societies, yet they also present many challenges. This course explores the past, present, and possible future effects of science and technology on society through readings and discussions of nonfiction articles in conjunction with science-fiction stories and novels. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of selected works of literary theory and of current issues in literary studies. The course is designed for advanced undergraduates who intend to continue their study of literature in graduate school and for new graduate students who require a grounding in literary theory. According to each instructor's interest, the course may survey contemporary literary theory or may focus on a particular topic (e.g., authorship, canon formation, creativity, metaphor, narrative, rhetoric) or on a theoretical position (e.g., cultural studies, deconstruction, feminism, historicism, Marxism, psychoanalysis). A student may repeat the course with the permission of the appropriate director. Prerequisite: Completion of three junior-senior courses in English (or their equivalent) or graduate standing. LEC
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Brief history of writing materials and handwritten books; history of printed books from the fifteenth century as part of cultural history; technical progress and aesthetic change. (Same as HIST 500.) LEC
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A Study of texts written between 1485 and 1800. May be organized around a particular genre (e.g. poetry, prose, or drama), historical period (e.g. Elizabethan literature; literature of the English Civil War; eighteenth-century literature), a group of writers (e.g. women writers), or a theme (e.g. "Renaissance English Literature and the Environment" or "Sex, Politics and Drama 1660-1800"). Students are expected to practice research skills in their written assignments. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Intensive study of selected works. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as EURS 512.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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An examination of Holocaust literature, which may include fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and film. Theoretical concerns may include such issues as memory, trauma, representation, imagination, exile, alienation, silence, the body and emotions, and intergenerational transmission. Prerequisite: Completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of ENGL 351. May be repeated for undergraduate credit up to a total of six hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 351 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of ENGL 352. May be repeated for undergraduate credit up to a total of six hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 352 or its equivalent. LEC
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A continuation of ENGL 353. May be repeated for undergraduate credit up to a total of six hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 353 or its equivalent. LEC
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A continuation of ENGL 354. May be repeated for undergraduate credit up to a total of six hours. Prerequisite: ENGL 354 or its equivalent. LEC
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The art and craft of writing for publication in a variety of forms: review, travel essays, specialized articles (e.g., business, science, literature), the personal essay, or the non-fiction book. Prerequisite: Completion of the nine-hour Freshman-Sophomore English requirement and permission of instructor. LEC
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Study of twentieth-century literary works. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Stresses research methods in technical communication and simulates on-the-job training through live interviews and other forms of research. Students master the relevant software tools and begin to develop a technical-writing portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL 362. LEC
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Students apply the principles of communicating business, scientific, and technical information to targeted readers. Concentration on the varying writing styles for online documents, proposals, reports, specifications, journal articles, and larger documents, as appropriate to their audience. Simulates an internship and helps students further develop a technical-writing or -editing portfolio. Students provide weekly status reports and a final report detailing their learning experience and present it to an appropriate technical communication class to help other students better understand the field. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC
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Students learn to use specialized vocabulary and editing tools such as proofreaders' marks, style guides, and standard editorial reference material; and they practice how to identify and correct common problems. Students usually work with writers in other technical writing courses, learning to work productively with other peoples' print and online documents. Students practice taking editing tests and develop a technical-editing portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL 362. LEC
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A study of American, British, or comparative drama from the late nineteenth century to the present. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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