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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An analysis of econometric forecasting techniques, including time-series models, single-equation regression models, and multiple-equation regression models. The course will examine forecasts of (a) macroeconomic variables, such as interest rates, investment, GNP, and the rate of inflation; and (b) market variables, such as price and quantity. Prerequisite: ECON 715 or ECON 817. LEC
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Advanced study of recent research in applied microeconomics and business behavior. Topics include vertical integration, collusion, multi-plant and multi-product operations, regulated industries, tying arrangements, and the empirical links between monopoly power and profitability. Prerequisite: ECON 630 or equivalent. LEC
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An analytical and historical exploration of the roles that science and technology have played in the economic growth of industrial societies. Topics covered include factors influencing the pace and character of technological innovation, national systems of innovation, the diffusion of new technologies, measurement of the benefits of new technologies, and the role of technology in various growth theories. Prerequisite: ECON 520, or ECON 524, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced study of the theory of economic growth and development. Recent growth models, theory of underdevelopment, programming, policies and plans for development. Prerequisite: ECON 520 and ECON 522. LEC
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A study of the techniques employed in the preparation of a national economic plan and of the policies required for its implementation. Special attention is given to the purposes of a plan, development strategies, investment requirements, and project appraisal. The development plans of several countries are examined to illustrate problems of planning economic development. Prerequisite: ECON 520 and ECON 522. LEC
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This course examines the modern, financial-asset market approach to exchange rate determination as well as dynamic exchange rate models. Possible topics may include exchange rate overshooting, exchange rate crises, and international policy coordination. Prerequisite: ECON 605 and MATH 116. LEC
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An analysis of governmental fiscal activity and its economic effects with emphasis on the determination and incidence of budget policy. Prerequisite: ECON 520 and ECON 522; ECON 622 recommended. LEC
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An analysis of the American state and local finance scene with special emphasis on urban and regional tax and expenditure problems and issues. Prerequisite: ECON 520 and ECON 522; ECON 622 recommended. LEC
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A study of the process of economic growth as it has occurred in the American economy, with emphasis on 19th century developments. The structural changes that accompanied growth and the impact of technological change are among the major topics considered. Prerequisite: ECON 520, ECON 522 and ECON 530, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The development of market economies and economic institutions. The course will focus on Europe, but will include comparisons with other developed nations. Topics include: long-run economic growth, the rise of capitalistic agriculture and industry, the causes and consequences of technological change; changes in income distribution and economic organization; and the social and cultural effects of economic change. Prerequisite: ECON 520, ECON 522, and ECON 535 or ECON 530, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the development of the industrialization of England and its impact on the North Atlantic economy. Consideration will be given to the effects of demographic and technical changes upon economic structure and the changing economic relationships between nations. Prerequisite: ECON 520 and ECON 522 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the economic analysis of choice under uncertainty and asset pricing theory. Topics include the general equilibrium Arrow-Debreu model of complete markets; capital asset pricing model; stochastic dominance; portfolio frontiers; mutual fund separation theorems; arbitrage pricing theory; valuation of derivative securities. Both single-period models and multi-period models will be discussed. Students should have some background in elementary linear algebra, calculus, and probability theory. Prerequisite: DSCI 301 and ECON 700 or equivalent. LEC
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A theoretical and empirical analysis of labor supply and demand, human capital, information and labor mobility, unemployment, discrimination, and union behavior and influence. Prerequisite: ECON 520, and MATH 121 or MATH 115 and MATH 116. LEC
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Economic models involving the maximation of a scalar (vector) function subject to equality and inequality constraint where the variables are in a finite dimensional Euclidean space. Characterization of optimal points by way of first and second order derivatives and by way of saddle points. Duality theorems of mathematical programming. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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An advanced course in price and distribution theory. Prerequisite: ECON 800 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The study of the operation of the economic system taking into account the diversity of goods and services. Primary attention is centered upon the competitive economy. A study is made of the existence, uniqueness, stability, and comparative statics of equilibrium positions. In addition, a study is made of ways of evaluating alternative states of the economy in terms of systems of value judgments. This includes a discussion of the Arrow Impossibility Theorem; the notion of a Pareto-satisfactory process is introduced and the relationship between Pareto-optimal states and competitive equilibrium positions is studied. Prerequisite: ECON 801. LEC
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The study of Harrod-Domar growth models; the Solow model; Uzawa's two sector model; n-sector growth models; the Ranis-Fei development models; and other application of growth theory to public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 700 and ECON 701. LEC
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Economic models involving the maximization of an integral (a vector of integrals) subject to differential equality (inequality), integral equality (inequality), and finite equality (inequality) constraints. Characterization of optimal paths by way of first and second derivatives. Existence of optimal paths. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of basic macroeconomic models, including Classical and Keynesian as well as more recent ones. Topics also cover monetary and fiscal stabilization policies, the role of rational expectations, and basic behavioral equations. Tradeoffs of inflation and unemployment are examined both theoretically and empirically. Prerequisite: ECON 809 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Structure of dynamic models and intertemporal optimization. Monetary and real business cycle theories and long-run economic growth. Microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, theories of explicit and implicit contracts, and implications of overlapping generations models. Prerequisite: ECON 810. LEC
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An intensive study of the general linear model and distribution theory associated with the multivariate normal; stochastic difference equation; autocorrelation, errors in variables. Prerequisite: MATH 628. LEC
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The study of estimation and hypothesis testing within the context of the stochastic simultaneous equations model. Prerequisite: ECON 817. LEC
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A study of numerical applications of Walrasian general equilibrium theory to problems in public finance, international trade, and macroeconomics. The Arrow-Debreu model will be reviewed with emphasis on the use of Kakutani's fixed point theorem to prove existence of equilibrium. Fixed point algorithms used to solve the general equilibrium model will be studied. The Shoven-Whalley method for introducing taxes into the general equilibrium model will be discussed and extended to open economy models with tariffs and quotas. Finally, dynamic macroeconomic models will be studied and financial assets will be introduced in perfect foresight models. Prerequisite: ECON 801. LEC
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This course is designed to provide extra assistance for graduate students in economics. RSH
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A comprehensive introduction to game theory and the theory of industrial organization. Basic game theoretic equilibrium concepts will be discussed in the context of static games, games of incomplete information, and dynamic games. These concepts will be applied to the theory of industrial organization. Topics may include mechanism design, market failure, monopoly, imperfect competition and oligopoly, limit pricing, predatory pricing, innovation and technical change, advertising and signaling theory, collusion and coordination, regulation under incomplete information, agency and auditing problems, incentives in hierarchies, job market signaling, insurance markets, nonlinear pricing and monopoly, and bargaining and long term relations. Prerequisite: ECON 801 and 802. RSH
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This course provides an analytical introduction to the study of the economic rationale for and effects of government regulation of industry. Special emphasis will be placed on public utility regulation. Prerequisite: ECON 700. LEC
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Comparative studies of the organization, operation, and performance of economic systems. Theoretical issues involving the comparison of different economic systems will be covered. Theoretical characterizations of different economic systems such as capitalistic economies, socialistic economies, and centrally planned economies, will be developed. Case studies of economic institutions and economic performance in various countries will be examined. Prerequisite: ECON 700 and ECON 701. LEC
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This course will examine the process and policies of economic development from a microeconomic perspective. Selected topics may include: the use of input-output matrices in development planning; price controls and corrections for their allocative distortions; international trade policies; transformations from planned to market economies; labor markets and labor mobility; and capital markets and capital mobility. LEC
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Formal construction of the foundations of economic planning with emphasis on concise discussion of the logic behind the techniques utilized in economic planning. Topics that will be studied include: social welfare, short-term planning, price guided planning procedures, non-price guided planning procedures, long-term planning objectives, and characteristics of optimal plans. Prerequisite: ECON 802 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will examine the process and policies of economic development from a macroeconomic perspective. Topics will include the theory of growth in the dual economy, the role of foreign trade in economic development, inflation and stabilization in developing economies, the problem of foreign debt, the relationship between financial and real development, and various development policies. Prerequisite: ECON 810 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This is an advanced course in international finance. Possible topics include optimizing, equilibrium models of exchange rate determination, empirical tests of international asset-pricing models, international policy coordination, and properties of different international monetary arrangements. Prerequisite: ECON 811. LEC
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The study of the pure theory of international trade; factor-price equalization, trade and welfare, general equilibrium in the international economy, comparative statics, and stability conditions. Prerequisite: ECON 700 and ECON 701. LEC
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Advanced analysis of the economic relationships between natural resources, population, and environment. Emphasis is on the analytical techniques useful for solving the economic problems of natural resource allocation over time. Prerequisite: ECON 700. LEC
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A rigorous treatment of the economics of the public sector. Emphasis will be placed on government expenditure and taxation. Possible topics include tax incidence, optimal taxation, dynamic analysis of fiscal policy, public goods, and cost benefit analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 801 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A critical study of selected aspects of American economic history with particular emphasis upon the testing of hypotheses that have been advanced to explain the growth and development of the American economy. Prerequisite: ECON 766. LEC
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This course presents an analysis of financial markets and instruments, together with the quantitative tools essential for research in the field. The material will be presented in a discrete time setting and will stress the link between financial economics and equilibrium theory. Topics will include securities pricing in the absence of arbitrage, the theory of risk and utility in the basic portfolio problem, mean variance analysis and the CAPM, the Martingale properties of security prices, restricted participation, asymmetric information, and recent research results. Prerequisite: ECON 802 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces students to the data and empirical methods used in the fields of applied economics such as labor economics, public finance, and industrial organization. The course will focus on how to adjust for self-selection and identify causal relationships in applied microeconomic fields. Topics covered include economic data and statistical programming, instrumental variables, difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, count data, sample selection, treatment effects, and duration models. Attention will be given to the suitability of the methods to the research question under consideration. Each topic will emphasize the proper application of the methods using the standard textbook treatment as well as assigned papers that examine the basic economic issues, the econometric techniques, and the applications to data. Prerequisite: ECON 817 and ECON 818, or consent of instructor. ECON 915 is recommended. LEC
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An advanced course in economic theory that will study selected topics in economic theory such as consumer theory, linear economics, decision theory, stability of economic equilibrium, comparative statics, etc. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced study of current general equilibrium analysis, the mathematical tools involved in such analysis, and some applications to other branches of economic theory. Prerequisite: ECON 802 and ECON 810. LEC
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A continuation of the advanced study of general equilibrium analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 901. LEC
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This seminar-workshop is designed to study advanced research topics in the areas of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, and also provide assistance in the preparation and development of the dissertations of Ph.D. candidates in these areas of specialization. LEC
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An advanced exploration of the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, neoclassical macroeconomics with and without money, Keynesian and neo-Keynesian macroeconomics, and economic stabilization, inflation, and unemployment. Prerequisite: ECON 802 and ECON 810. LEC
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An analysis of economic policy in dynamic economic models. The effects of various policies on the equilibrium, stability, and adjustment paths of the models will be considered. Both open and closed economies will be analyzed. Prerequisite: ECON 810. MATH 320 is recommended. LEC
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This course examines how money, monetary policy, and monetary institutions influence the macroeconomy. Modern theories of money demand are presented and critiqued. The function of commercial banks, non-bank financial intermediaries, and central banks in the money supply process is addressed. Interrelationships between the tools, the instruments, the operating procedures, the intermediate targets, and the goals of policy are examined. Additional topics may include the monetary transmission mechanism, the effect of uncertainty on optimal policy decisions, the rules versus discretion debate, the monetary implications of fiscal policy, the term structure of interest rates, the causes and consequences of bank runs and financial panics, and the optimal method of constructing weighted monetary aggregates. Prerequisite: ECON 811 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The study of selected topics in applied cross-section econometrics for uses mainly in applied microeconomics, public finance, and labor economics. Topics include traditional econometrics of production and demand, latent variable models, panel data studies, probabilistic choice models, censored and truncated models, sample selection, disequilibrium models, duration studies, and semi- and non-parametric models. Prerequisite: ECON 818, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of selected topics in applied time-series econometrics for use mainly in applied macroeconomics, international finance, and development economics. Topics include empirical applications of ARCH models, VAR models (study of impulse response function and variance decomposition), unit-root cointegration and long memory models. Bayesian unit root analysis, estimation and inference of dynamic general equilibrium models, model calibration and simulation are also possible topics of this course. Prerequisite: ECON 818, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of structural and nonlinear time series approaches to econometric modeling and inference. The course emphasizes techniques needed to use economic theory in system-wide econometrics. Emphasis is placed on selection of functional form for approximation to theoretical functions and the use of duality theorems for derivation of the resulting econometric systems of equation. Inference with those models will be by nonlinear parametric, semi-parametric, and nonparametric methods. Prerequisite: ECON 818. LEC
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This course is designed to provide a variety of new econometric tools useful to investigate financial data. It discusses how to measure and forecast financial volatility using models such as Stochastic Volatility, multivariate GARCH, and Dynamic Conditional Correlation models. It also covers Dynamic Factor models and State Space models, which can be used in many financial data analyses. The course will be particularly helpful for the students preparing dissertations in the field of finance, macro-finance, monetary economics, international finance, and development economics. It will also benefit the students interested in more practical use of tools in the field such as financial risk management, insurance, and commercial banking. Prerequisite: ECON 818. ECON 916 is recommended. LEC
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This seminar-workshop is designed to study advanced research topics in the area of econometric theory and application, and also provide assistance in the preparation and development of the dissertations of Ph.D. candidates in this area of specialization. LEC
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A study of the concepts of equilibrium and stability in various economic frameworks; static economies, changing economies, and disaggregated and aggregated economies. Prerequisite: ECON 802. LEC
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This seminar-workshop is designed to study advanced research topics in the area of economic history, and also provide assistance in the preparation and development of the dissertations of Ph.D. candidates in this area of specialization. LEC
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This seminar-workshop is designed to study advanced research topics in the specified area of applied economics (public finance, monetary analysis, environment-energy, economic growth and development, urban economics, health care economics, natural resources, labor-manpower, international trade and finance, comparative economic systems, Soviet economics), and also provide assistance in the preparation and development of the dissertations of Ph.D. candidates with dissertations in a specific area of applied economics. LEC
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Rigorous analysis of an Arrow-Debreu economy with natural resources and extensions (including optimal growth, planning procedures, and uncertainty). Investigation of current research topics in theoretical and applied resource economics. Required course for Ph.D. candidates writing dissertations in natural resources. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. ECON 927 recommended. RSH
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A survey of recent labor economics research. Topics include labor supply and demand, human capital investment, and unemployment. Prerequisite: ECON 770. LEC
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Introduction to information technology and the computer as a general tool processing information. Topics include internet tools (including browsers, search engines and web page construction), networking, computer organization, algorithms, programming languages, data representation and manipulation, binary numbers and Boolean logic, system and application software (including word processors, spreadsheets and presentation software), operating systems, databases, artificial intelligence, social and ethical issues in computing, information security, and mobile computing. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104 or eligibility to enroll in MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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Introduction of computer-based problem solving techniques for engineering practice with emphasis on good programming practices and the integration of appropriate computational and related tools. Solutions are computed using Visual Basic, specifically VBA within Excel. Elementary numerical and statistical methods are applied to the solution of sets of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, linear regression, and root finding. Microsoft Office is used with the computational tools to provide integrated report generation capability. Two lectures and a weekly laboratory instruction. Prerequisite: MATH 104. LEC
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Algorithm development, basic computer organization, syntax and semantics of a high-level programming language, including testing and debugging. Concept of structure in data and programs, arrays, top-down design, subroutines and library programs. Abstract data types. System concepts such as compilation and files. Nature and scope of computer science. Not open to students who have taken EECS 805. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or meeting the requirements to enroll in MATH 115 or MATH 121. LEC
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An introductory course in digital logic circuits covering number representation, digital codes, Boolean Algebra, combinatorial logic design, sequential logic design, and programmable logic devices. Corequisite: MATH 104. LEC
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An introductory course in digital logic circuits covering number representation, digital codes, Boolean algebra, combinatorial logic design, sequential logic design, and programmable logic devices. This course is intended for highly motivated students and includes honors-level assignments. Co-requisite: MATH 121, plus either acceptance into the KU Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Problem solving using a high level programming language and object oriented software design. Fundamental stages of software development are discussed: problem specification, program design, implementation, testing, and documentation. Introduction to programming using an object oriented language: using classes, defining classes, and extending classes. Introduction to algorithms and data structures useful for problem solving: arrays, lists, files, searching, and sorting. Student will be responsible for designing, implementing, testing, and documenting independent programming projects. Professional ethics are defined and discussed in particular with respect to computer rights and responsibilities. Corequisite: MATH 104. LEC
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Problem solving using a high level programming language and object oriented software design. Fundamental stages of software development are discussed: problem specification, program design, implementation, testing, and documentation. Introduction to programming using an object oriented language: using classes, defining classes, extending classes. Introduction to algorithms and data structures useful for problem solving: arrays, lists, files, searching, and sorting. Students will be responsible for designing, implementing, testing, and documenting independent programming projects. Professional ethics are defined and discussed in particular with respect to computer rights and responsibilities. This course is intended for highly motivated students and includes honors-level assignments. Co-requisite: MATH 121, plus either acceptance into the KU Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Mathematical foundations including logic, sets and functions, general proof techniques, mathematical induction, sequences and summations, number theory, basic and advanced counting techniques, solution of recurrence relations, equivalence relations, partial order relations, lattices, graphs and trees, algorithmic complexity, and algorithm design and analysis. Throughout there will be an emphasis on the development of general problem solving skills including algorithmic specification of solutions and the use of discrete structures in a variety of applications. Prerequisite: EECS 168 or 169 (or equivalent) and MATH 122. LEC
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Analysis of linear electrical circuits: Kirchoff's laws; source, resistor, capacitor and inductor models; nodal and mesh analysis; network theorems; transient analysis; Laplace transform analysis; steady-state sinusoidal analysis; computer-aided analysis. Prerequisite: Co-requisite: Math 220 and MATH 290. LEC
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Continued study of electrical circuits: Steady-state power analysis, three-phase circuits, transformers, frequency response, and two-port network analysis. Prerequisite: EECS 211. LEC
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Vector analysis. Electrostatic and magnetostatic fields in a vacuum and material media. Electromagnetic fields and Maxwell's equations for time-varying sources. The relationship between field and circuit theory. Simple applications of Maxwell's equations. Prerequisite: MATH 220, MATH 290, PHSX 211, and EECS 211. LEC
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This course continues developing problem solving techniques by focusing on the imperative and object-oriented styles using Abstract Data Types. Basic data structures such as queues, stacks, trees, and graphs will be covered. Recursion. Basic notions of algorithmic efficiency and performance analysis in the context of sorting algorithms. Basic Object-Oriented techniques. An associated laboratory will develop projects reinforcing the lecture material. Three class periods and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: EECS 168 or EECS 169. LEC
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Introduction to diodes, BJTs and MOSFETs, and their use in electronic circuits, especially digital circuits. Prerequisite: Upper-level eligibility. Corequisite: EECS 212. LEC
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Introduction to DC and AC electrical circuit analysis techniques, AC power calculations, transformers, three-phase systems, magnetic circuits, and DC and AC machines with a focus on applications. Not open to electrical or computer engineering majors. Prerequisite: A course in differential equations and eight hours of physics. LEC
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Introduction to DC and AC electrical circuit analysis, operational amplifiers, semiconductors, digital circuits and systems, and electronic instrumentation and measurements with a focus on applications. Not open to electrical or computer engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for both EECS 316 and EECS 317. Prerequisite: A course in differential equations and eight hours of physics. LEC
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Introduction to operational amplifiers, semiconductors, digital circuits and systems, and electronic instrumentation and measurements with a focus on applications. Not open to electrical or computer engineering majors. Students may not receive credit for both EECS 316 and EECS 317. Prerequisite: EECS 315. LEC
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Laboratory exercises intended to complement EECS 315, EECS 316 and EECS 317. Experiments include DC circuits, analog electronics, and digital electronics. Not open to electrical or computer engineering majors. Co-requisite: EECS 316 or EECS 317. LAB
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Fourier signal analysis (series and transform); linear system analysis (continuous and discrete); Z-transforms; analog and digital filter analysis. Analysis and design of continuous and discrete time systems using MATLAB. Prerequisite: EECS 212 and upper level EECS eligibility. LEC
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The course is a survey of programming languages: their attributes, uses, advantages, and disadvantages. Topics include scopes, parameter passing, storage management, control flow, exception handling, encapsulation and modularization mechanism, reusability through genericity and inheritance, and type systems. In particular, several different languages will be studied which exemplify different language philosophies (e.g., procedural, functional, object-oriented, logic, scripting). Prerequisite: EECS 268 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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Internal organization of microprocessor and microcontroller systems; programming in assembly language; input and output system; controlling external devices. The course will focus on one or two specific microprocessors and computer systems. Prerequisite: EECS 140 or EECS 141, EECS 168 or EECS 169, and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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An electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science project pursued under the student's initiative, culminating in a comprehensive report, with special emphasis on orderly preparation and effective composition. Prerequisite: Upper-level EECS eligibility and consent of instructor. IND
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Discrete and integrated amplifier analysis and design. Introduction to feedback amplifier analysis and design. Introduction to feedback amplifiers. Prerequisite: EECS 312 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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This course applies electromagnetic analysis to high frequency devices and systems where wave propagation effects cannot be neglected. Topics covered include transmission lines, space waves, waveguides, radiation, and antennas. Laboratory experiments include transmission line, waveguide, and antenna measurements and characterizations. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory. Prerequisite: EECS 220 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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The design of computer systems from hardware point of view. The implementation of functional and control units. Introduction to VHDL, and its use in modeling and designing digital systems. Prerequisite: EECS 388. LEC
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An introduction to the modeling, analysis, and design of linear control systems. Topics include mathematical models, feedback concepts, state-space methods, time response, system stability in the time and transform domains, design using PID control and series compensation, and digital controller implementation. Prerequisite: EECS 212 and EECS 360. LEC
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This course is an introduction to software engineering, and it covers the systematic development of software products. It outlines the scope of software engineering, including life-cycle models, software process, teams, tools, testing, planning, and estimating. It concentrates on requirements, analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of software products. The laboratory covers CASE tools, configuration control tools, UML diagrams, integrated development environments, and project specific components. Prerequisite: EECS 268 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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Introduction to probability and statistics with applications. Reliability of systems. Discrete and continuous random variables. Expectations, functions of random variables, and linear regression. Sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Joint, marginal, and conditional distribution and densities. Prerequisite: MATH 290, MATH 220 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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An introduction to crystal structures, and metal, insulator, and semiconductor properties. Topics covered include the thermal, electric, dielectric, and optical properties of these materials. A significant portion of this course is devoted to the properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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Arranged to allow students to satisfy the independent research requirement for graduation with departmental honors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and upper-level EECS eligibility. IND
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A lecture/laboratory course involving the design and implementation of prototypes of electrical and computer type products and systems. The project specifications require consideration of ethics, economics, manufacturing, and safety. Prerequisite: EECS 412 and EECS 562. LEC
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A lecture/laboratory course involving the design and implementation of prototypes of electrical and computer type products and systems. The project specifications require consideration of ethics, economics, health, manufacturing, and safety. Prerequisite: EECS 501. LEC
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Finite state automata and regular expressions. Context-free grammars and pushdown automata. Turing machines. Models of computable functions and undecidable problems. The course emphasis is on the theory of computability, especially on showing limits of computation. May be taken for graduate credit. (Same as MATH 510.) Prerequisite: EECS 210 and upper-level EECS eligibility. LEC
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Feedback amplifier circuit analysis, power amplifiers, analog IC op-amp techniques and analysis, filter approximation and realization, oscillators, wave generators and shapers. Prerequisite: EECS 412. LEC
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A two semester lecture/laboratory course involving the specification, design, implementation, analysis, and documentation of a significant hardware and software computer system. Laboratory work involves software, hardware, and hardware/software trade-offs. Project requirements include consideration of ethics, economics, manufacturing, safety, and health aspects of product development. Can be taken only during the senior year. Prerequisite: EECS 443 and EECS 448. LEC
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A two semester lecture/laboratory course involving the specification, design, implementation, analysis, and documentation of a significant hardware and software computer system. Laboratory work involves software, hardware, and hardware/software trade-offs. Project requirements include consideration of ethics, economics, manufacturing, safety, and health aspects of product development. Can be taken only during the senior year. Prerequisite: EECS 541. LEC
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The design, analysis, simulation, and layout of integrated circuit systems using CMOS technology. Students will carry out a design from initial concept through mask layout. The use of computer aided design tools is emphasized. Prerequisite: EECS 312 and EECS 470. LEC
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Data abstraction and abstract data types. Topics include the design and implementation of dictionary, priority queues, concatenated queue, disjoint set structures, graphs, and other advanced data structures based on balanced and unbalanced tree structures. Special emphasis will be placed on the implementations of these structures and their performance tradeoffs. Both asymptotic complexity analysis and experimental profiling techniques will be introduced. Labs will be used to provide students with hands-on experience in the implementations of various abstract data types and to perform experimental performance analysis. Prerequisite: EECS 210 and EECS 448. LEC
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A first course in communications, including lectures and integrated laboratory experiments. After a review of spectral analysis and signal transmission, analog and digital communications are studied. Topics include: sampling, pulse amplitude modulation, and pulse code modulation; analog and digital amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation; frequency and time division multiplexing; and noise performance of analog modulation techniques. Prerequisite: EECS 212 and EECS 360. LEC
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An introduction to the principles used in communication networks is given in this course. Topics include a discussion of the uses of communications networks, network traffic, network impairments, standards, layered reference models for organizing network functions. Local Area Network technology and protocols are discussed. Link, network, transport layer protocols, and security are introduced. TCP/IP networks are stressed. VoIP is used as an example throughout the course. Basic concepts of network performance evaluation are studied, both analytical and simulation techniques are considered. Prerequisite: EECS 168 and either EECS 461 or MATH 526. LEC
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An introductory course on electric power generation and transmission. Topics will include: electric power system components; environmental impact; renewable energy sources; power system networks and flow; synchronous generators; transformers; high voltage transmission systems; power quality; stability; blackouts. Prerequisite: EECS 212 or EECS 315 and EECS 220 or PHSX 212. LEC
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The background and planning phase of a two-semester, team-oriented lecture/laboratory course involving the specification, design, implementation, and documentation of a significant software system. The course includes the consideration of project management, ethics, economics, and technical writing. Can be taken only during the senior year. Prerequisite: EECS 448, EECS 510 and EECS 560. LEC
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The design and implementation phase of a two-semester, team-orientated lecture/laboratory course involving the specification, design, implementation, and documentation of a significant software system. The course includes the consideration of project management, ethics, economics, and technical writing. Can be taken only during the senior year. Prerequisite: EECS 581. LEC
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A study of unwanted generation and reception of radio-frequency radiation from analog and digital electronic systems and how these emissions/receptions can be reduced. Topics covered include sources of radiation, grounding, shielding, crosstalk, electrostatic discharge, and practical design and layout schemes for reducing unwanted radiation and reception. Also covered are the major governmental electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) regulations and standards that apply to commercial electronic devices and systems. Prerequisite: EECS 220 and EECS 312. LEC
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