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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, GEOL 783, HIST 728, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The tropical environment and biota; ecologic relations, communities and evolution in the tropics. Primarily a field course, taught in Costa Rica; two sessions per year, February-March, July-August. FLD
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This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as AMS 700, GEOL 781, HIST 723, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, GEOL 782, HIST 720, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Field experiences in various habitats, with an emphasis in ecology, systematics, behavior, and collection techniques. FLD
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General account of the osteology, geological distribution, and evolution of the principal groups of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as GEOL 725.) LEC
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Evolution of mammals, and anatomical modifications involved in the process as ascertained from the fossil record. Lectures and laboratory. (Same as GEOL 726.) LEC
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A study of fishes. Lecture topics include the structure and function of fishes; the adaptations of fishes to the aquatic environment; and a survey of major fish groups with emphasis on evolutionary relationships and biogeography. Laboratory topics include a survey of fishes using specimens, and the use of keys to identify fishes with emphasis on the Kansas fish fauna. A research paper using primary scientific literature is required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. LEC
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A study of mammals, with emphasis on systematics, biogeography, and natural history. Lectures, laboratory, and field study. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 413. LEC
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Evolutionary biology of amphibians with emphasis on systematics, morphology, development, reproductive strategies, and distribution; lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 664 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Evolutionary biology of reptiles with emphasis on systematics, morphology, reproductive strategies, and distribution; lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 664 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Training in the techniques of collecting vertebrate fossils, description and interpretation of the stratigraphy of fossiliferous sediments, and interpretation of the adequacy and bias of samples. FLD
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, GEOL 785, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Provides directed, practical experience in collection care and management, public education, exhibits and administration with emphases to suit the particular requirements of each student. Full time for one semester or half time for two semesters. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD
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Advanced courses on special topics in biology, given as need arises. Lectures, discussing readings, laboratory or fieldwork. Students may select sections according to their special interests. LEC
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Discusses aspects of graduate education that are directed at the post PhD phases of a career, but that must be initiated early in the graduate student program of study. One 3-hour discussion per week. LEC
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This course introduces aspects and issues associated with being an ethical, responsible, and professional research scientist. Included topics are professional practices, regulations, and rules that define the responsible and ethical conduct of research. Graduate students will become familiar with and prepare to navigate through challenges that occur during a career in research science. The format of individual classes is expected to incorporate both instruction and discussion. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Extensive reading and discussion of the primary literature on topics relating to major patterns in the evolutionary history of insects, including the fossil history of insects, the monophyly of arthropods, the origin of wings, the changing role of insects in ecological communities, the origins of social behavior, modes and mechanisms of speciation, and patterns of species diversity. Assigned readings require a solid background in evolutionary theory and insect biology, especially morphology, development, and classification. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the advanced study of biochemistry, microbiology, genetics, cell and developmental biology, and neurobiology for all Molecular Biosciences graduate students. Topics can include macromolecular structure, metabolism, kinetics and thermodynamics, bioinformatics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetic mechanisms, cell structure and function, signal transduction, basic and pathogenic bacteriology, immunology, virology, membrane potentials, synaptic transmission, and sensory neurophysiology. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Presentation and discussion of specific areas of recent research in biochemistry. This course may be taken more than once. LEC
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Covers recent advances in immunochemistry and immunobiology. Topics include structure and function of antibodies, hybridoma systems, idiotypes, induction and regulation of the immune response through cell interactions and cytokine action, and the role of immune activity in disease states such as hypersensitivity, autoreactivity, and cancer. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or an introductory course in immunology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Emphasis is on virulence factors of microorganisms and the host response to infection. Topics will include pathogenesis of intracellular and extracellular parasites, bacterial adhesins, and toxins, and the role of innate and acquired immunity in host resistance and the response to infection. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The intermediary reactions catalyzed by the bacterial cell during energy-requiring processes. Themodynamic considerations of these processes are discussed. Knowledge of calculus is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbiology and a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course concentrates on evaluation of current literature concerning all aspects of molecular biology, biochemical characterization, and pathogenic mechanisms involved in host-virus interactions. Students will be expected to present articles and participate in discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics and a course in virology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A literature-based course that covers recent advances in microbial molecular genetics. Topics include transcription, translation, mutagenesis and repair, genetic exchange mechanisms, and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to common techniques used for research strategies in molecular biosciences. The course will cover common techniques in cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, and neurobiology. Information will be presented in lectures and through practical demonstrations. This course is primarily intended for first year graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biosciences. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Molecular Biosciences Graduate Program or consent of instructor. LAB
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Principles of English communication skills for the professional scientist. The course explores the form, function, and practice (including ethics) of scientific communication, emphasizing elements of writing and speech that are important to clarity and precision. The course covers written and verbal communication of primary research results as well as composing correspondence, a curriculum vitae, reviews, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC
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The application of statistical methods to data from various fields of biological research. Special emphasis is placed on practical computational procedures. Prerequisite: College algebra. LEC
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This course is primarily devoted to special advanced topics in analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and regression analysis. Polynomial regression and multiple linear regression will be presented as will the general linear model. Elementary matrix algebra will be developed as needed. Prerequisite: BIOL 841. LEC
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An introduction to the theory and practice of phylogenetic systematics. Includes principles of character analysis including determination of homology and determination of character polarity, testing alternate phylogenetic trees, and reconstructing trees using computer techniques. Also includes principles of constructing phylogenetic classifications and the nature of taxa in the phylogenetic system. Other topics, such as the nature of species and principles of biogeography are included. Prerequisite: Twenty hours natural history. LEC
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A survey of methods for inferring phylogenetic trees from character data and using phylogenies to address evolutionary questions. Lectures will present the relevant theory and algorithmic description of methods. Computer lab will familiarize students with software that implements the analyses discussed in lecture. Intended for graduate students specializing in systematics. Prerequisite: BIOL 845 and BIOL 841 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Second semester of a two-semester lecture course on gene expression. Emphasis on control of gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 772 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Presentation and discussion by graduate students and faculty of selected topics centering on observed changes in structure and function of organisms from a phylogenetic point of view. Presentation will include results of original research when possible and appropriate, and otherwise, will be based on syntheses of recent literature. RSH
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Original investigation by students at the master's degree level. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Ten or more hours of microbiology and consent of department. RSH
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A lecture course providing balanced coverage of Mendelian and molecular genetics of humans; includes discussions and presentations on current issues in human and medical genetics. Prerequisite: A course in genetics. LEC
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Research which is to be incorporated into an M.A. thesis. Not more than ten hours may be earned. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Advanced course examining current research topics in biochemistry and biophysics. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental admission. LEC
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Advanced course examining current research topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. SEM
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Advanced course examining current research topics in neurobiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. LEC
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Advanced course examining current research topics in microbiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. RSH
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A review of current literature in molecular genetics. RSH
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May be repeated for credit up to six hours. Review of current literature and genetic theory of selected topics such as population, molecular, quantitative, and physiological genetics. RSH
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Directed research on selected topics. Prerequisite: BIOL 770 or equivalent. RSH
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This course emphasizes the use of techniques for solving problems of structure and function of biological macromolecules. Students will complete several modules that consist of lectures relating to theory and practical aspects of each methodological approach, and apply these techniques to solving a specific problem. Students will submit a paper describing the resulting data and conclusions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807, BIOL 808, and BIOL 818, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Formats, strategies, and styles of research grant proposal writing. Prerequisite: Completion of three semesters of the molecular biosciences or genetics program graduate curriculum, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Two lectures and one seminar-recitation. A detailed consideration of electron microscopic analyses of cell structure as related to cell function. Prerequisite: BIOL 416. LEC
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Matrix formulation of multivariate models and data. Specific methods covered include Principal Components Analysis, Factor Analysis, Multiple Group Discriminant Analysis and Canonical Analysis, and Canonical Correlation Analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 842 or knowledge of elementary matrix algebra. LEC
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Presentation and discussion by instructor and students of mathematical and statistical concepts in ecology. Topics are selected from texts or sets of readings. LEC
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Reading and discussions of evolutionary mechanisms from the genetic, ecologic, and systematic viewpoints. Prerequisite: BIOL 412. LEC
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Introduction to theory and practice of contemporary molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, computer graphics, data analysis, use of structure and sequence databases, docking, and homology modeling. Weekly computer laboratory section aimed at allowing participants to pursue independent research projects that incorporate modeling aspects. Lectures, laboratory manuals, program descriptions, and technical notes are presented on course web page. (Same as MDCM 952.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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(Same as GEOG 937.) LEC
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Individual investigations; laboratory, field or museum; or reading assignments in specialized topics not ordinarily treated in other courses. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. RSH
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Original research that is to be incorporated into a Ph.D. dissertation. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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