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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Training in the techniques of collecting vertebrate fossils, description and interpretation of the stratigraphy of fossiliferous sediments, and interpretation of the adequacy and bias of samples. FLD
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, GEOL 785, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Provides directed, practical experience in collection care and management, public education, exhibits and administration with emphases to suit the particular requirements of each student. Full time for one semester or half time for two semesters. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD
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Advanced courses on special topics in biology, given as need arises. Lectures, discussing readings, laboratory or fieldwork. Students may select sections according to their special interests. LEC
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Discusses aspects of graduate education that are directed at the post PhD phases of a career, but that must be initiated early in the graduate student program of study. One 3-hour discussion per week. LEC
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This course introduces aspects and issues associated with being an ethical, responsible, and professional research scientist. Included topics are professional practices, regulations, and rules that define the responsible and ethical conduct of research. Graduate students will become familiar with and prepare to navigate through challenges that occur during a career in research science. The format of individual classes is expected to incorporate both instruction and discussion. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Extensive reading and discussion of the primary literature on topics relating to major patterns in the evolutionary history of insects, including the fossil history of insects, the monophyly of arthropods, the origin of wings, the changing role of insects in ecological communities, the origins of social behavior, modes and mechanisms of speciation, and patterns of species diversity. Assigned readings require a solid background in evolutionary theory and insect biology, especially morphology, development, and classification. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the advanced study of biochemistry, microbiology, genetics, cell and developmental biology, and neurobiology for all Molecular Biosciences graduate students. Topics can include macromolecular structure, metabolism, kinetics and thermodynamics, bioinformatics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetic mechanisms, cell structure and function, signal transduction, basic and pathogenic bacteriology, immunology, virology, membrane potentials, synaptic transmission, and sensory neurophysiology. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program in Molecular Biosciences, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Presentation and discussion of specific areas of recent research in biochemistry. This course may be taken more than once. LEC
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Covers recent advances in immunochemistry and immunobiology. Topics include structure and function of antibodies, hybridoma systems, idiotypes, induction and regulation of the immune response through cell interactions and cytokine action, and the role of immune activity in disease states such as hypersensitivity, autoreactivity, and cancer. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or an introductory course in immunology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Emphasis is on virulence factors of microorganisms and the host response to infection. Topics will include pathogenesis of intracellular and extracellular parasites, bacterial adhesins, and toxins, and the role of innate and acquired immunity in host resistance and the response to infection. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The intermediary reactions catalyzed by the bacterial cell during energy-requiring processes. Themodynamic considerations of these processes are discussed. Knowledge of calculus is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbiology and a course in biochemistry, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course concentrates on evaluation of current literature concerning all aspects of molecular biology, biochemical characterization, and pathogenic mechanisms involved in host-virus interactions. Students will be expected to present articles and participate in discussions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics and a course in virology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A literature-based course that covers recent advances in microbial molecular genetics. Topics include transcription, translation, mutagenesis and repair, genetic exchange mechanisms, and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisite: BIOL 807 and BIOL 808, or a course in microbial genetics, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to common techniques used for research strategies in molecular biosciences. The course will cover common techniques in cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, and neurobiology. Information will be presented in lectures and through practical demonstrations. This course is primarily intended for first year graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biosciences. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Molecular Biosciences Graduate Program or consent of instructor. LAB
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Principles of English communication skills for the professional scientist. The course explores the form, function, and practice (including ethics) of scientific communication, emphasizing elements of writing and speech that are important to clarity and precision. The course covers written and verbal communication of primary research results as well as composing correspondence, a curriculum vitae, reviews, etc. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC
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The application of statistical methods to data from various fields of biological research. Special emphasis is placed on practical computational procedures. Prerequisite: College algebra. LEC
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This course is primarily devoted to special advanced topics in analysis of variance, analysis of covariance and regression analysis. Polynomial regression and multiple linear regression will be presented as will the general linear model. Elementary matrix algebra will be developed as needed. Prerequisite: BIOL 841. LEC
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An introduction to the theory and practice of phylogenetic systematics. Includes principles of character analysis including determination of homology and determination of character polarity, testing alternate phylogenetic trees, and reconstructing trees using computer techniques. Also includes principles of constructing phylogenetic classifications and the nature of taxa in the phylogenetic system. Other topics, such as the nature of species and principles of biogeography are included. Prerequisite: Twenty hours natural history. LEC
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A survey of methods for inferring phylogenetic trees from character data and using phylogenies to address evolutionary questions. Lectures will present the relevant theory and algorithmic description of methods. Computer lab will familiarize students with software that implements the analyses discussed in lecture. Intended for graduate students specializing in systematics. Prerequisite: BIOL 845 and BIOL 841 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Second semester of a two-semester lecture course on gene expression. Emphasis on control of gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 772 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Presentation and discussion by graduate students and faculty of selected topics centering on observed changes in structure and function of organisms from a phylogenetic point of view. Presentation will include results of original research when possible and appropriate, and otherwise, will be based on syntheses of recent literature. RSH
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Original investigation by students at the master's degree level. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Ten or more hours of microbiology and consent of department. RSH
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A lecture course providing balanced coverage of Mendelian and molecular genetics of humans; includes discussions and presentations on current issues in human and medical genetics. Prerequisite: A course in genetics. LEC
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Research which is to be incorporated into an M.A. thesis. Not more than ten hours may be earned. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Advanced course examining current research topics in biochemistry and biophysics. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental admission. LEC
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Advanced course examining current research topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. SEM
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Advanced course examining current research topics in neurobiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. LEC
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Advanced course examining current research topics in microbiology. Extensive student/faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of assigned readings of research reports, and oral presentations. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Enrollment in graduate school, and departmental permission. RSH
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A review of current literature in molecular genetics. RSH
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May be repeated for credit up to six hours. Review of current literature and genetic theory of selected topics such as population, molecular, quantitative, and physiological genetics. RSH
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Directed research on selected topics. Prerequisite: BIOL 770 or equivalent. RSH
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This course emphasizes the use of techniques for solving problems of structure and function of biological macromolecules. Students will complete several modules that consist of lectures relating to theory and practical aspects of each methodological approach, and apply these techniques to solving a specific problem. Students will submit a paper describing the resulting data and conclusions. Prerequisite: BIOL 807, BIOL 808, and BIOL 818, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Formats, strategies, and styles of research grant proposal writing. Prerequisite: Completion of three semesters of the molecular biosciences or genetics program graduate curriculum, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Two lectures and one seminar-recitation. A detailed consideration of electron microscopic analyses of cell structure as related to cell function. Prerequisite: BIOL 416. LEC
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Matrix formulation of multivariate models and data. Specific methods covered include Principal Components Analysis, Factor Analysis, Multiple Group Discriminant Analysis and Canonical Analysis, and Canonical Correlation Analysis. Prerequisite: BIOL 842 or knowledge of elementary matrix algebra. LEC
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Presentation and discussion by instructor and students of mathematical and statistical concepts in ecology. Topics are selected from texts or sets of readings. LEC
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Reading and discussions of evolutionary mechanisms from the genetic, ecologic, and systematic viewpoints. Prerequisite: BIOL 412. LEC
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Introduction to theory and practice of contemporary molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, computer graphics, data analysis, use of structure and sequence databases, docking, and homology modeling. Weekly computer laboratory section aimed at allowing participants to pursue independent research projects that incorporate modeling aspects. Lectures, laboratory manuals, program descriptions, and technical notes are presented on course web page. (Same as MDCM 952.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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(Same as GEOG 937.) LEC
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Individual investigations; laboratory, field or museum; or reading assignments in specialized topics not ordinarily treated in other courses. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. RSH
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Original research that is to be incorporated into a Ph.D. dissertation. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Introductory course concerning the concepts of statistical reasoning and the role of statistical principles as the scientific basis for public health research and practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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First-semester course of a two-semester introductory statistics course that provides an understanding of the proper application of statistical methods to scientific research with emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to public health practice and research. This course focuses on basic principles of statistical inference with emphasis on one or two sample methods for continuous and categorical data. This course fulfills the core biostatistics requirement. Prerequisite: Calculus or Permission of Instructor. LEC
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This course will utilize statistical packages (SAS and SPSS) for data management and analysis. Collection and management of data along with one, two and multiple sample parametric procedures will be covered for categorical and continuous data. Simple linear regression will also be covered. LEC
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Second level statistics course that provides an understanding of more advanced statistical methods to scientific research with an emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to public health practice, public health research, and clinical research. Special focus will be upon the utilization of regression methodology and computer applications of such methodology. Prerequisite: BIOS 714 or equivalent. LEC
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Methods for designed experiments including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), two-way ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and analysis of covariance are emphasized. Post- ANOVA tests, power and testing assumptions required in NOVA are discussed and applied. Outlier detection using robust estimators also are incorporated. Boxplots, histograms and scatterplots are used to display data. Prerequisite: PRE 710/711 or BIOS 714/717 or equivalent. Preferred: BIOS 715. Knowledge of statistical software, basic statistical plotting methods, p-values, two-sample t-test and simple linear regression is assumed. LEC
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This course will study nonparametric methods in many situations as highlighted by the following topics: Students will learn how nonparametric methods provide exact p-values for tests, exact coverage probabilities for confidence intervals, exact experimentwise error rates for multiple comparison procedures, and exact coverage probabilities for confidence bands. This course will be using EXCEL and SAS to conduct various procedures. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714) or the equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC
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Simple linear regression, multiple regression, logistic regression, nonlinear regression, neural networks, autocorrelation, interactions, and residual diagnostics. Applications of the methods will focus on health related data. Prerequisite: 1) Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (BIOS 714) or the equivalent and 2) Fundamentals of Biostatistics II (BIOS 717) or Analysis of Variance (BIOS 720) or Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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An intermediate level statistics course that provides an understanding of the more advanced statistical methods to scientific research with emphasis on the application of statistical methodology to clinical research, public health practice, public health research and epidemiology. Prerequisite: BIOS 714, BIOS 715, and BIOS 717 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course is an advanced statistical course for students who have had fundamental biostatistics and linear regression. Topics to be covered include Hotelling's T-squared test, MANOVA, principal components, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical analysis, and cluster analysis. More advanced topics such as Multidimensional Scaling or Structural Equation Modeling might be introduced if time allows. Computers will be extensively used through the whole course, and students are suggested to be familiar with some statistical software before taking this course. Although students are allowed to use the software they are comfortable with, SAS will be the primary statistical package used to demonstrate examples in this course. PREREQUISITES: BIOS 730 Applied Linear Regression or equivalents or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to computer programming in the R (S-Plus) and STATA language environments. The students will develop and run codes appropriate for most standard statistical models and related data analyses; develop code to import data of various types; conduct graphical and data analyses; apply appropriate models to investigate patterns and specific hypotheses. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The design, implementations, analysis, and assessment of controlled clinical trials. Basic biostatistical concepts and models will be emphasized. Issues of current concern to trialists will be explored. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. LEC
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This is a graduate level course preparing a student for the SAS base programming certification exam. We will cover the topics required for a student to pass the SAS base programming certification exam given by SAS. To this end, topics we will study will include, referencing files and setting options, creating list reports, understanding data step processing, creating and managing variables, reading and combining SAS data sets, do loops, arrays, and reading raw data from files. After the completion of the course the student should be able to create SAS programs to read data from external files, manipulate the data into variables to be used in an analysis, generate basic reports showing the results. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor LEC
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This course is an introduction to nonparametric statistical methods for data that do not satisfy the normality or other usual distributional assumptions. We will cover most of the popular nonparametric methods used for different scenarios, such as a single sample, two independent or related samples, three or more independent or related samples, goodness-of-fit tests, and measures of association. Power and sample size topics will also be covered. The course will cover the theoretical basis of the methods at an intermediate mathematical level, and will also present applications using real world data and statistical software. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The emphasis of this course is on learning the basics of experimental design and the appropriate application and interpretation of statistical analysis of variance techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, BIOS 820 recommended. LEC
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This course provides an understanding of both the mathematical theory and practical applications for the analysis of data for response measures that are ordinal or nominal categorical variables. This includes univariate analysis, contingency tables, and generalized linear models for categorical response measures. Regression techniques covered for categorical response variables, such as logistic regression and Poisson regression methods, will include those categorical and/or continuous explanatory variables, both with and without interaction effects. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor; BIOS 820 and BIOS 840 are recommended. LEC
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This course is an introduction to model building using regression techniques. We will cover many of the popular topics in Linear Regression including: simple linear regression, multiple regression, model selection and validation, diagnostics and remedial measures. Throughout the semester, we will be utilizing primarily SAS. Prerequisite: By permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the fundamentals of probability theory, random variables, distribution and density functions, expectations, transformations of random variables, moment generating functions, convergence concepts, sampling distributions, and order statistics. Prerequisite: By permission of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the fundamentals of statistical estimation and hypothesis testing, including point and interval estimation, likelihood and sufficiency principles, properties of estimators, loss functions, Bayesian analysis, and asymptotic convergence. Prerequisite: BIOS 871 or by permission of instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and methods of linear models for data analysis. The course includes the theory of general linear models including regression models, experimental design models, and variance component models. Least squares estimation, the Gauss-Markov theorem, and less than full rank hypotheses will be covered. Prerequisites: BIOS 871 and BIOS 872 or permission of instructor; BIOS 820 recommended. LEC
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This course provides students with experience in collaborative research under the supervision of an experienced researcher. The student will spend one semester working under an investigator or faculty member, making independent contributions to a research project. Prerequisites: BIOS 820, 830, 835, 840, 871, 872, and 890 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of law that are applicable to business transactions in the modern business world and the legal systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 hours completed). LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business law topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business law not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: BLAW 301; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A course designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of agency relationships, such as partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations, with special emphasis on the problems encountered by managers and directors in operating a corporation. The course should acquaint a student with how to create and operate a corporation in light of current federal and state enactments. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will address legal matters of concern to property owners, real estate agents and brokers, developers, renters, property managers, contractors, architects, planners, and lenders regarding real estate transactions. Concentrating on the general subjects of (1) the nature of real property, (2) transfer and financing of real estate, (3) land use and regulations, and (4) landlord and tenant relations, the course will address specific topics such as estates and interests in land, forms of ownership, agency and brokerage, and tax attributes of real estate investments, and will consider pertinent statutes and legal documents frequently used in real estate transactions. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An advanced course in legal aspects of business with emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisite: BLAW 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course involves the study of the theory and practice of dispute resolution and negotiation in business mediation (facilitated negotiation). Conflict resolution in the workplace, including grievance procedures, will be considered. Students are required to apply concepts studied through role playing simulations. (Same as MGMT 525.) Prerequisite: MGMT 310 and BE 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A course focused on understanding legal rights and duties and ethical responsibilities in the business environment and identifying and addressing legal risks in business decision making. This is an introductory course which includes an overview of several foundational areas of law that are highly relevant to business. LEC
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A course focused primarily on principles of contract and tort law. Contract law and tort law serve as the foundation for many other areas of law that are relevant in the business environment. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 701. LEC
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A course focused on the legal attributes of different forms of business organizations, such as partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. This course includes a study of the basic principles of agency law. It explores the rights and responsibilities of people and entities (such as partners, stockholders, directors, officers, contractors, employers, and employees) functioning in the organizational environment. Also considered are the interests of third parties, including the public, which brings into focus related topics, such as securities regulations, ethics, and corporate social responsibility. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 505. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 701. LEC
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An examination of the Uniform Commercial Code and related legal topics, such as bankruptcy and property law. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 515. Prerequisite: BLAW 301 or BLAW 701. LEC
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This course will include a study of the theory and practice of negotiation and dispute resolution in business contexts. It will focus on the use of alternatives to litigation, such as various forms of arbitration, mediation, and, especially, negotiation. In addition to emphasizing negotiation as a means of resolving disputes, attention will be directed at negotiation of transactions. Appreciation of concepts will be promoted through role play simulations. Not open to students with credit in BLAW 525 or MGMT 525. (Same as MGMT 748.) LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business law to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. Enrollment restricted. RSH
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For freshmen and sophomores. Study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. May be repeated for credit. IND
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Repertoire, performance practice, pedagogical, and stylistic concerns relating to the music for brass instruments throughout their history. Topics will include the physical development of the instruments, their usage as solo, chamber, and large ensemble instruments in both sacred and secular literature, and a survey of historical and modern bibliographic materials. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. IND
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This course acquaints students with the nature of business majors and careers. With this knowledge, students can explore, engage and implement their academic and career interests within business. Students are introduced to the curricula requirements, expectations of business students, possible career paths, and the necessary professional skills in the business environment. Prerequisite: Open only to students with fewer than 60 hours. LEC
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This course will provide students with structured opportunities for exploring business majors and associated career paths. Activities, readings, assignments, and discussions are designed with a focus on professional skills development and leadership growth. Students will receive a letter grade of A-F based on completion of class requirements. Enrollment is restricted. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of organizing a personal employment search strategy. Emphasis will be placed on the assessment of individual goals and talents, job markets, evaluation, and employment search strategies. It is highly recommended that students take this course during their junior year. Course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Course counts as an activity course. Prerequisite: Junior standing (60 hours completed). LEC
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This course is intended to prepare you for the rapidly changing environment of business information retrieval, using both print and electronic information sources. Course sessions will cover both (1) the conceptual analysis, selection, and use of business information sources and (2) research strategies and techniques in locating information on your topic. The course will focus on your ability to develop critical thinking skills in researching your topic throughout the semester. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business administration not otherwise available to non-business majors. Topics selected will be determined by special interest and objectives of the student in consultation with the faculty member who will supervise the directed study or research. Prerequisite: 3.0 grade-point average, major in a field other than business administration and/or accounting, and permission of instructor offering the directed study and of the director of the undergraduate program. IND
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Internships provide opportunities for students to integrate their academic education with a meaningful experience in the business world. Internships allow students to further their professional growth, explore career pathways, expand professional networks, and increase the relevancy of their academic course work. The internship course combines job-related activities of the internship position with a set of academic requirements. These requirements include academic assignments as well as a pre-and post-internship seminar held in the semester before and after the semester in which the internship occurs. Internships for credit must be approved by the coordinator of the internships prior to the internship experience. BUS 399 is limited to one (1) credit hour per offering, but students may count a maximum of two (2) cumulative credit hours of BUS 399 toward degree requirements. Internships must satisfy specific criteria in order to qualify for academic credit. Contact the Business Career Services Center in 125 Summerfield for information regarding the process of having an internship evaluated for academic credit. Prerequisite: Approval of the internship; two of the following: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A special variable-topic seminar open to seniors and graduate students meeting the requirements established by the faculty members offering the particular seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of management-related topics not adequately covered in any regular course available to students of the School of Business. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to bridge internship experiences with a management training program. The management training program, a program developed by the Main Event Management Corporation, is designed to facilitate better management and professional competencies through control of real-world experiences and learning. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. IND
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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(V) The course will cover several different ethical frameworks useful in making business decisions and help students identify and articulate their own personal value systems and recognize them in the context of these ethical frameworks. It will develop their capacity for discovering the ethical dimension of business decisions and actions and provide opportunities to apply the skills and knowledge learned to business situations. The course uses readings, lecture, and discussions of basic moral philosophy, covering ethical frameworks including religious-based frameworks, utilitarianism, universalism, and distributive justice. Visual media and guest lecturers from the business world will make occasional appearances. Students will be asked to interview business executives and report on those interviews. LEC
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This course is designed to bridge internship experiences with a management training program. The management training program, a program developed by the Main Event Management Corporation, is designed to facilitate better management and professional competencies through control of real-world experiences and learning. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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(V) Individual research work. Approval of faculty supervisor required. THE
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(FS) A core course for Ph.D. students (with the exception of Finance and Management) majoring in business administration. Provides a workshop format for discussion of the currently prevalent research methodologies and problems being addressed in the areas of accounting, finance, human resources management, information systems, marketing, decision sciences, organizational behavior, and strategic management. All Ph.D. students and faculty are encouraged to attend workshops of interest. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program. LEC
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(F) The objective of this course is to improve the teaching effectiveness of the participants. Highly effective teachers demonstrate their teaching techniques and discuss the reasons underlying their actions. School of Business Ph.D. students are required to take this seminar during the first semester in which they are the instructor of record for a course. LEC
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The major objectives of this doctoral level course on the responsible conduct of research are to build students' abilities to analyze ethical issues, and to expose students in advance to various issues that may arise while engaging in the research endeavor. Issues will be covered that arise in such areas as research design, data collection and management, the use of human subjects, data analysis, authorship, publication, peer review, and other aspects of professional practice. LEC
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An introduction to the University of Kansas and work done by professional engineers. Students are introduced to the resources available to them at KU, in the School of Engineering, and in the Chemical and petroleum Engineering Department. They are introduced to the curricula requirements and expectations of chemical engineering students. The career opportunities for chemical engineers are described. Students are introduced to engineering ethics, basic safety considerations, teamwork, and technical writing. The course includes fundamental calculations of material and energy balances and fluid flow. LEC
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A survey course on global energy supply and demand, production methods and energy economics. Course begins with the matrix of energy supply and demand focusing on fossil fuels and nuclear energy and includes transportation/ distribution patterns and issues and current production technologies. We then analyze alternate energy realities and potentials such as solar energy, wind energy, biomass utilization, hydrogen, fuel cells, hydroelectric, geothermal, wave/tidal, and others based on thermodynamic principles and economics. Course is also open to non-engineering students. LEC
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Formulation of engineering problems for machine computation with emphasis on good programming practices and the integration of appropriate computational and related tools. Solutions are computed using Excel, Visual Basic, and general purpose languages such as Mathcad and/or MATLAB. Computing methods are introduced as tools for developing solutions using elementary numerical techniques including linear interpolation, linear regression, numerical integration, and root finding. Microsoft Office is used with the computational tools to provide integrated report generation capability. Two lectures and weekly laboratory instruction. Prerequisite: MATH 121. LEC
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