Print...

Browse all courses

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
Show courses in
with a course number to
worth in .

There are 9,337 results.

Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Visual Art courses; and permission of instructor. Does not fulfill ART 695/ART 696 requirement. IND
View current sections...
Individual studio activity under direction of faculty adviser; capstone experience. Prerequisite: Thirty hours of departmental electives, consent of department, and permission of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Continuation of ART 695; capstone experience. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: ART 695 and permission of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Individual studio activity under the direction of faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate director and enrollment in the Visual Art MFA program. RSH
View current sections...
Continuation of Directed Study III. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Visual Art MFA Program. RSH
View current sections...
Continuation of Directed Study IV. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Visual Art MFA Program. RSH
View current sections...
Individual graduate studio research in visual art. Course content to be determined by the student under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in The School of The Arts and permission of the instructor. RSH
View current sections...
Research reading and presentation of reports on specific subjects related to the student's major area of specialization. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the MFA Program in the Department of Visual Art. RSH
View current sections...
The graduate seminar emphasizes professional preparation for contemporary artists focusing on writing skills, oral presentations, critiques of individual creative research/artwork, critical thinking about and visual analysis of current art forms and contemporary approaches to the teaching of studio art. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program in Visual Art. SEM
View current sections...
Lecture, discussion, and supervised research in current topics related to contemporary studio theory and criticism. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. This course will be counted as a graduate level academic elective in course and credit distribution. LEC
View current sections...
Weekly discussion of issues and/or work in art. (Graded on a satisfactory/or F basis.) Repeat for credit in subsequent semesters. SEM
View current sections...
Individual graduate studio research in visual art. Course content to be determined by the student under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 805 and permission of the instructor. RSH
View current sections...
Original research in visual art culminating in a thesis exhibition. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: Thirty-six credit hours of graduate credit and permission of the graduate review committee. THE
View current sections...
A survey course that describes the interplay between the science of astronomy and cultural beliefs. It uses, among others, examples of how religious and philosophical tenets have enhanced or conflicted with scientific principles. Not for astronomy majors. LEC
View current sections...
The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Concurrent enrollment in ASTR 196 suggested, but not required. Prerequisite: One year each of high school algebra and geometry. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to astronomical observations and methods. Students have the opportunity to use the telescopes at the K.U. observatory. The course includes constellation recognition, finding celestial objects, and interpreting astronomical data. A companion course to ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Counts as a laboratory science when preceded or accompanied by ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. LAB
View current sections...
An exploration of astronomical extremes from various points of view: extremes in ages (the Big Bang and recent star formation), velocities and distances (quasars), rotation (pulsars), density (white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes), energy release (stellar explosions), and proximity (interacting binary stars). Prerequisite: Survey course in astronomy. LEC
View current sections...
Undergraduate observational or theoretical problems in astronomy. Maximum credit, six hours. Prerequisite: Permission of department. IND
View current sections...
An honors, calculus-based introduction to astronomy and astrophysics, required for astronomy majors. Components of the Universe - from planetary systems, stellar systems, large scale structure and cosmology - are examined to illuminate the physics principles which govern their evolution. Not open to students with prior credit in ASTR 191 or ASTR 291. Prerequisite: MATH 121, and either permission of instructor, or participation in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the search for planets around other stars and for life in the universe beyond the earth. A discussion of the astronomical conditions under which life might form and the biological conditions of life formation and evolution. Methods of searching for extraterrestrial life. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biology, astronomy or geology. LEC
View current sections...
This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their adviser. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as EPHX 503 and PHSX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Fundamentals of stellar astronomy including astronomical optics and techniques, coordinate and time systems, stellar spectroscopy, properties of normal, binary and variable stars. Prerequisite: PHSX 212. An introductory astronomy course is desirable. LEC
View current sections...
A study of stellar groups, the interstellar medium, galactic structure and dynamics, galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisite: ASTR 591 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Students acquire practical experience with astronomical equipment and data reduction techniques used in research and educational contexts. Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 591. LEC
View current sections...
Individual students work on specialized research problems in the field of observational or theoretical astrophysics. Maximum credit, six hours. Prerequisite: ASTR 592. IND
View current sections...
An introduction to radiation processes, thermal processes, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the interstellar medium. (Same as EPHX 691 and PHSX 691.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The formation and evolution of stars, nucleosynthesis of the elements, and the physical processes of high energy physics. Prerequisite: ASTR 691 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Seminar designed to cover current topics in the physics of the Universe beyond the solar system. Content will vary. Graduate students engaged in or preparing for research may repeat enrollments in this course. Open to undergraduates with twelve hours of physics/astronomy courses numbered 500 or above, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The physics of fully ionized gases in magnetic fields and their application to interplanetary processes, planetary radiation belts, and the surface of the sun. The motion of charged particles in magnetic fields, magnetohydrodynamic waves, the solar wind and the magnetosphere. (Same as PHSX 795.) Prerequisite: PHSX 621. Corequisite: PHSX 631. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced computer applications in physics and astronomy. General discussion and illustration of problem organization and solution by numerical and other methods with examples from plasma, space, solid state, elementary particle, and nuclear physics and astronomy. Students will design, write, validate, and document a computer program to solve a physical problem. (Same as PHSX 815 and CHEM 914.) Prerequisite: Six hours of computer science courses numbered 300 or above, and six hours of physics and/or astronomy courses numbered 300 or above. LEC
View current sections...
Graduate students engaged in or preparing for research may repeat enrollments in this course. The content will vary. (Same as PHSX 897.) LEC
View current sections...
A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of ATMO 105. A lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the atmosphere, weather and climate phenomena, and their controlling physical processes. Topics covered include: the structure of the atmosphere, energy and energy budgets, climate and climate change, air pollution, clouds and precipitation, pressure and wind systems, severe weather, and weather forecasting. Prerequisite: Membership in University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introductory lecture course which surveys the general principles and techniques of atmospheric science and illustrates their application through discussions of natural but unusual weather phenomena such as blizzards, hurricanes, tornados, and chinooks, of the effects of air pollution on weather, and of intentional human alteration of the atmosphere. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces students to meteorological events that affect aircraft operations. Aviation applications of meteorological observations including satellite and radar observations are discussed. Students learn about graphical displays of meteorological information. Numerical forecasting models and how their output is applied for aviation is also considered. Forecasting of weather events of particular interest to aviation such as ceiling, visibility, icing and turbulence is emphasized. Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or AE 245 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to introduce students to the nature of the Earth's physical climate. It introduces the basic scientific concepts underlying our understanding of our climate system. Particular emphasis is placed on energy and water balances and their roles in evaluating climate change. The course also evaluates the impact of climate on living organisms and the human environment. Finally, past climates are discussed and potential future climate change and its impact on humans is evaluated. (Same as GEOG 321.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or GEOG 104. LEC
View current sections...
Open to students with nine hours of upper level credit in Atmospheric Science, an average of at least 3.5 in all Atmospheric Science courses, and an overall average of at least 3.25. Includes the preparation of an honors paper and its defense before a committee of a least two regular faculty members. LEC
View current sections...
A first course in synoptic meteorology designed to introduce students to weather analysis and forecasting through the application of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic principles to operational analysis and forecasting. Topics include analysis and interpretation of surface and upper-air observations and data from satellites, radars, and wind profilers; chart and sounding analysis; and three-dimensional, conceptual models of weather systems. The course includes student-led weather briefings and analysis exercises. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to basic numerical weather prediction methods. Computer programs are used to apply numerical methods to weather data and to evaluate dynamical processes on numerical grids. Meteorological graphics packages are used to analyze current weather data and numerical model output. Current operational numerical models and output products are discussed. Prerequisite: ATMO 505, MATH 122, and EECS 138 or EECS 168. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the distribution and circulation of water in the air-earth system as influenced by atmospheric processes and surface conditions. The solar and terrestrial radiation budget and the water balance at the earth's surface will be applied to agricultural and urban energy and water problems. Prerequisite: ATMO 105 or EECS 138. LEC
View current sections...
A study of climatic environment near the earth-atmosphere interface. Consideration of rural climates in relation to agriculture and urban climates as influenced by air pollution and other factors. Emphasis is on physical processes in the lower atmosphere, distribution of atmospheric variables, the surface energy budget and water balance. (Same as GEOG 521.) Prerequisite: ATMO 105 and MATH 106 or MATH 121. LEC
View current sections...
A study of background levels and concentrated sources of atmospheric pollution together with considerations of pollution buildup in urban areas as related to particular weather conditions. Inadvertent weather modifications and effects of atmospheric pollution on particular weather events and general climate will be discussed. Prerequisite: ATMO 105, MATH 121, and EECS 138. LEC
View current sections...
An investigation of special topics in atmospheric science. May include topics in dynamic, physical or synoptic meteorology or climatology as well as related topics in earth and physical sciences. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC
View current sections...
Students enhance their forecasting expertise by preparing forecasts for presentation to the public through a variety of media. Classroom activities include weekly map discussions and analysis of current weather situations. Forecasting topics such as forecast verification, aviation forecast products, severe weather, flash floods and watches and warnings are examined. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 505. FLD
View current sections...
Practical experience in private industry working with current and/or archived meteorological data. Possibilities include the preparation of forecasts for TV stations and meteorological consulting firms, and working with environmental consulting firms to assess air pollution hazards. May be repeated two times for credit. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 605. FLD
View current sections...
Practical experience working in a National Weather Service forecasting center in analyzing weather data and preparing weather forecasts. May be repeated two times for credit. Credit for ATMO 605, ATMO 606, and ATMO 607 is limited to a total of eight hours, six of which may be counted toward a degree in atmospheric science. Prerequisite: ATMO 605. FLD
View current sections...
Interpretation, development, and analysis of synoptic charts. Prerequisite: ATMO 505 and ATMO 640. LEC
View current sections...
Atmospheric processes are described and discussed in relation to the climate of the earth's surface. Such topics as the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, and the effect of solar irradiance on climatic change will be included. The physical processes and relationships between various climatic features will be studied. Prerequisite: ATMO 505 and DSCI 301 or MATH 526. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of fluid dynamics necessary for understanding large scale atmospheric motions. Fundamental physical laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are examined and applied to atmospheric flows. Rotation in the atmosphere is examined quantitatively in terms of both circulation and vorticity. Prerequisite: MATH 223, PHSX 212, prerequisite or corequisite of ATMO 505. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to prepare students to effectively use remotely sensed data in operational or research settings for further work in this field. Topics include radiation and radiation transfer applied to active and remote sensing; radiative properties of space, sun, earth and atmosphere; instrument design considerations and operational characteristics; inversion methods for temperature or concentration profiling; surface temperature measurement; cloud top height determination; rain rate and wind velocity measurement; severe weather detection; satellite photograph interpretation. Prerequisite: ATMO 680, MATH 581. LEC
View current sections...
Analysis and interpretation of synoptic weather charts including treatment of numerical weather forecasting. Prerequisite: ATMO 630 and ATMO 660. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced study of the atmosphere including treatment of the vorticity equation. Prerequisite: ATMO 630, ATMO 640, PHSX 211, and MATH 123. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to enhance the student's understanding of atmospheric processes through the study of these processes at molecular through micro scales. Topics include the properties and behavior of gases; transfer processes; phase change; solar and earth radiation; cloud drop, ice crystal and precipitation formation; atmospheric electricity; stratospheric chemistry. Prerequisite: MATH 223, PHSX 212. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Nine hours in meteorology. IND
View current sections...
Current research in atmospheric science will be discussed. May be repeated for a total of two credit hours. Prerequisite: Senior level in atmospheric science. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Twelve credit hours in meteorology. IND
View current sections...
Presentation of contemporary approaches to the study of atmospheric dynamics. May include methodologies that provide insight into global, synoptic, mesoscale or microscale motions. Prerequisite: ATMO 660 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Illustration and application of contemporary approaches to mathematical and statistical description of atmospheric phenomena. Prerequisite: MATH 122, ATMO 640, ATMO 680, and a course in statistics, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The physical processes and operating principles involved in the development and life cycles of extreme or unusual weather events including tornadoes, blizzards, lightning displays, and tropical storms. Prerequisite: EECS 138, MATH 121, and ATMO 320. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced investigation of special topics in atmospheric science. May include topics in dynamic, physical or synoptic meteorology or climatology as well as related topics in earth and physical sciences. May be repeated if topic differs. LEC
View current sections...
An exploration of the mathematical methods used to describe the current state of the atmosphere and to predict future states. Current operational numerical weather prediction techniques will be included. Prerequisite: ATMO 660. LEC
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
View current sections...
Testing of hearing using pure tone air and bone conduction tests with normal and with hard of hearing individuals. (Same as SPLH 670.) Prerequisite: AUD 697 or concurrent. LAB
View current sections...
The course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Audiometric calibration, pure tone and speech testing, analysis of audiograms, middle ear testing. Prerequisite: AUD 697. LAB
View current sections...
A study of disorders of the auditory system including anatomical, physiological, perceptual, and audiological manifestations of pathologies affecting hearing. Prerequisite: AUD 810 and AUD 829. LAB
View current sections...
A study of relations between common acoustic stimuli and the responses they elicit; consideration of sensory scales, noise phenomena, and speech intelligibility. Prerequisite: AUD 697 and AUD 829. LAB
View current sections...
A study of the major components of hearing conservation programs in industrial, educational, and military settings. Forensic audiology issues related to occupational hearing loss are included. Prerequisite: AUD 697 and AUD 829. LAB
View current sections...
Presentation/Discussion of psychological/counseling theories and techniques and how they relate to the profession of audiology. LEC
View current sections...
Acoustic and perceptual characteristics of phonemes, words, and connected speech for normal-hearing adults and infants; how speech perception is assessed clinically and is affected by hearing loss, aging, use of amplification, talker differences, and linguistic factors. LEC
View current sections...
Normal and pathological development of the auditory system; pediatric audiometric testing; auditory and communication aspects in the habilitation of hearing-impaired children. Prerequisite: AUD 697 and AUD 810. LAB
View current sections...
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the normal peripheral and central vestibular system; clinical assessment of vestibular disorders; vestibular rehabilitation. LEC
View current sections...
Study of the components, function, fitting, and performance characteristics of hearing aids, applications of amplification in rehabilitative audiology. Prerequisite: AUD 697 and AUD 810. LEC
View current sections...
Principles and methods of auditory, communication, and social assessment and intervention with hard of hearing and deaf adults, children, and their families. Prerequisite: AUD 810 and AUD 819 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
The advanced study of the theoretical bases, techniques, and clinical application of hearing aids and their assessment. Participants will review, present, and discuss contemporary issues in hearing aid literature and research. Prerequisite: AUD 819. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the generation, control and measurement of the simple and complex sounds essential to clinical audiology and hearing research. LAB
View current sections...
Through lecture and discussion format, this course will cover the principles and methods of assessment, candidacy, surgery, programming and rehabilitation of patients receiving cochlear implants. In addition, hearing assistance technologies such as large area systems and alerting devices will be covered with emphasis on classroom amplification. Prerequisites: AUD 819 and AUD 821 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The study of the anatomy and physiology of the central auditory system. Analysis and review of the diagnostic procedures and the therapeutic strategies for central auditory processing disorders. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced study of the anatomical and physiological properties of the human hearing and vestibular mechanisms. LEC
View current sections...
Supervised clinical work at the University and/or University Medical Center audiology clinics, or affiliated, off-campus practicum sites. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. FLD
View current sections...
Theoretical bases, techniques, and clinical applications for auditory evoked potentials including electrocochleography, auditory brainstem response, middle and late latency and cognitive responses. Prerequisite: AUD 810, AUD 822, AUD 829, or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Presentation and discussion topics including: basic pharmacology (pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics), mechanisms of ototoxicity, selected ototoxic agents, drugs used in otolaryngology, and a review of patient management strategies. Prerequisites: enrollment in the Au.D. or Ph.D. audiology program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to audiology business practice principles. Operational functions of the audiology clinic will be reviewed, including human resources, marketing, legal and ethical practice concerns, billing, coding and reimbursement. Prerequisites: enrollment in the Au.D. or Ph.D. audiology program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced study of selected topics in audiology such as (but not limited to): cochlear micromechanics and other physiological processes; psychoacoustics, speech perception, cochlear implants, etc. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Audiology Ph.D. program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Presentations/discussion of clinical case studies and professional issues in Audiology. Au. D. students and audiology faculty members will participate in these sessions. DIS
View current sections...
Supervised clinical work at the University and/or University Medical Center Audiology Clinics, or affiliated off-campus sites. The Clinic Rotation is intended to prepare students for entry into their Clinical Externship and foster increasing independence. Clinical skills required are defined in standards set forth by the American Speech-Language Association. FLD
View current sections...
Supervised clinical work at the University of Kansas and/or KUMC audiology clinics, or affiliated, off-campus sites. The Clinical Externship is intended to refine clinical skills, increase clinical independence, and ensure that clinical skills meet the certification standards in audiology set forth by the American speech-Language-Hearing Association. Open to 3rd and 4th year Au.D. students. Approval from Instructor needed for 3rd year students. PRA
View current sections...
Study and performance of literature written for wind ensembles using an instrumentation somewhat smaller than the traditional concert band. Literature ranges from early wind and band music to contemporary avant-garde wind ensemble literature. Prerequisite: Audition and permission of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
For freshmen and sophomores. Three one-hour rehearsals each week. Performances include concerts on campus and tours throughout the area. Literature includes wind music, transcriptions, and other standard concert band literature. Prerequisite: Permission of director. ACT
View current sections...
For freshmen and sophomores. This concert organization performs on campus as well as in other area concerts. The band studies and performs music from the standard band repertoire. Prerequisite: Permission of director. ACT
View current sections...
Open to all qualified University students, regardless of major field. Public performances include presentation of drill-marching maneuvers and pageantry at all home football games as well as several trips each season. Three two-hour rehearsals per week. Offered fall semester only. Membership by audition. For freshmen and sophomores. ACT
View current sections...
For freshmen and sophomores. Three one-hour rehearsals each week. Performances include concerts on campus and tours throughout the area. Literature includes wind music, transcriptions, and other standard concert band literature. Prerequisite: Permission of director. ACT
View current sections...
For juniors and seniors. ACT
View current sections...
For juniors and seniors. ACT
View current sections...
Primary voicings and textural possibilities for wind and percussion instruments will be stressed as these resources relate to the arranging of music for marching and pep bands at the secondary level. (Same as MTHC 459.) Prerequisite: MTHC 214. LEC
View current sections...
 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 >  Last ›

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.