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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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This advanced method course provides curriculum design and instructional procedures appropriate for students at the elementary and middle school levels, including functional academic, social, and home and community life skills. NOTE: This is a 2 credit course to be offered during the first 8 weeks of a semester. It will precede SPED 814 in the same semester. Prerequisite: SPED 614 or SPED 714: Learning Styles and Instructional Accommodations. LEC
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This advanced method course provides curriculum design and instructional procedures for students at the secondary level, including career preparation and transition from school to adult life in the community. Prerequisite: SPED 614 or SPED 714: Learning Styles and Instructional Accommodations. LEC
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Examines basic learning procedures and techniques that are essential to programming efforts with the severely or young handicapped. Includes assessment scales, writing instructional programs, measuring operant behavior and evaluating operant behavior. Task and concept analysis related to treatment programs. Prerequisite: Students in the Early Childhood for the Handicapped program must enroll in one hour of practicum, SPED 775. Students in the Severely Handicapped Program must have completed SPED 726. LEC
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This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills to implement federal and state development mandates for special education and related services programs for young children from birth to five. It covers procedures for developing, implementing, and evaluating (a) instructional accountability for these children's participation in the general early childhood curriculum, (b) relationships between general and special early education personnel and programs; (c) roles and responsibilities; (d) interdisciplinary team planning including families; (e) coordinating, educating, and supervising paraeducators; and (f) general management responsibilities associated with instruction of young children with disabilities. Prerequisite: SPED 760 or SPED 860, which may be taken concurrently. LEC
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This course is designed for graduate students enrolled in the Masters of Science Program with an emphasis in school-age populations primarily with high mild disabilities or seeking to obtain a license to teach students needing an adapted curriculum in Kansas. Course experiences focus on how to identify and implement evidenced-based practices designed to increase the success of students with mild disabilities in mathematics, social studies, science, and language arts through their participation in general and special education classrooms primarily in grades 4-12. This course emphasizes practices associated with understanding and evaluating curricular demands, monitoring student progress in content-area courses, providing tiered supports and accommodations in teaching, using assessment and grading alternatives, and incorporating the principles of explicit and strategic instruction to design instruction that will promote and enhance content-area learning. The course is intended for persons working toward the Kansas teaching license in teaching students needing an adapted curriculum. Prerequisite: SPED 730, SPED 741, admittance into the High Incidence Disabilities program in the Department of Special Education, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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In this course, students learn assessment techniques and instructional strategies for teaching learners with sensory and/or motor impairments and complex medical needs. Students will learn use of residual and alternative senses; proper positioning and transfer for students with motor impairments, nutrition, hydration, and medical monitoring, and seizure activity. Students will develop appropriate goals and objectives in the sensory and motor areas, incorporate related services into inclusive educational settings, embed sensory and motor skills training into the general education curriculum, adapt materials and apply assistive technologies. Prerequisite: SPED 632 or SPED 732, and SPED 742. LEC
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This course is designed to introduce educators and related service professionals to prevention and intervention related to a broad range of antisocial, aggressive, and behavioral problems. Approaches focus on understanding and addressing the precipitating factors related to inappropriate behavior, short-term approaches for immediate crises, and problem-solving strategies for longer-term change. Course content will include antisocial, aggressive, and violent behavior; options for classroom interventions; school and system-oriented interventions, and ethical and legal issues involved in various prevention and intervention approaches. Class work will focus on literature, research-based intervention approaches, and case work illustrating specific approaches and programs. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731, SPED 741, and SPED 743. LEC
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This advanced course examines current principles and practices in the development of multi-modal communication programs for students who do not spontaneously use speech for effective communication. It provides a framework upon which communication programming decisions can be based and interventions and strategies can be developed. Prerequisite: SPED 632 or SPED 732, and SPED 742. LEC
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Provides experiences in applying information on identifying learning and behavioral characteristics of exceptional children and youth. Practices in adapting curriculum materials to meet the needs of the handicapped. Prerequisite: SPED 725 and SPED 735. LEC
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This course focuses on laws that apply to special education, especially "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" and "No Child Left Behind Act." The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law, and judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting students with disabilities and examines the six principles of P. L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. (Same as ELPS 856.) LEC
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Students to analyze public policy that affects citizens with disabilities, various models of analysis are brought to bear on federal policy (e.g., education, transportation, housing, institutionalization, protection and advocacy, medical assistance, employment, vocational rehabilitation, and others). This course is not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as ELPS 857.) Prerequisite: SPED 851 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course addresses the issues that professionals (e.g., educators, physicians, allied health providers, attorneys, and others) and families of persons with disabilities face in the context of public values, attitudes, and rules of law. The issues include education, treatment and nontreatment. This course is not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as ELPS 858.) Prerequisite: SPED 850, SPED 852 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills to implement federal and state mandates for special education and related services programs as they relate to building and maintaining relationships with families of students with disabilities, and developing effective school programs. It covers procedures for developing, implementing, and evaluating (a) instructional accountability for special education students' participation in district and state assessment; (b) relationships between general and special education personnel and programs; (c) roles and responsibilities; (d) interdisciplinary team planning including families; (e) coordinating, educating, and supervising paraeducators; and (f) general management responsibilities associated with instruction of children and youth with disabilities. Course topics will include collaboration in schools, community systems and families, historical perspectives of family life and school involvement, effective relationships between home, school, community, communication among professionals and with families, school-based programs, home-based programs, and multicultural considerations. Prerequisite: SPED 631 or SPED 731, or SPED 632 or SPED 732, or SPED 735. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide a background in career development and transition education for persons with disabilities from middle school through adulthood. Emphasis is placed on IDEA requirements for transition services, career development and transition processes, transition services assessment, secondary special education curricular implications, career development and transition service needs, collaborative services in schools and communities to promote quality transition services, and issues and trends in transition education and services. LEC
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This course is designed to provide graduate students in special education and related areas with an overview of employment and vocational models for adolescents and young adults with disabilities. Emphasis is placed upon theory and practice related to career development, supported employment, working with businesses, and school and community vocational training models. Prerequisite: SPED 856 or SPED 858. LEC
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This course is designed to provide a review of psychometric principles and their utility as a foundation for quality assessment in transition assessment and planning for youth with disabilities. Formal and informal assessments across a range of transition planning areas are reviewed and evaluated. Skills in curriculum-based assessment, rating scales, situational assessment, and functional assessment are emphasized. Prerequisite: SPED 856 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of interagency and community services and systems for adolescents and young adults with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on theory and practice related to interagency collaboration; systems change efforts in transition services; and state-of-art practices regarding supporting individuals with disabilities in community employment, living, socialization, community participation, and other areas of adult life. Prerequisite: SPED 856. LEC
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This course is designed to prepare students to implement specialized alternative strategies for individualized group instruction. Methods for developing and implementing overall treatment/educational programs, planning or selecting curriculum/service models for programs, and developing instructional materials are emphasized. Procedures for managing classroom staff and service resources, coordinating educational programs with families, other service personnel and program support staff, and monitoring overall program effectiveness are addressed. Prerequisite: SPED 760. LEC
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The problems, trends, issues, and procedures used in planning life skills, occupational and vocational skills, and transition from school to adult living for persons with disabilities. Separate sections will be organized by topics pertaining to career/vocational development, assessment, and transition programs and services. These will include: (a) transitions from early childhood to adulthood, (B) application of assessment information, and (c) vocational preparation and employment. Prerequisite: SPED 725 (may be taken concurrently). LEC
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This course is designed to provide intensive field work and direct teaching experiences with children and youth with disabilities in educational, residential, and clinical settings. Prerequisite: SPED 775. LEC
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A course to develop knowledge and skills in the techniques of interviewing and conferencing, with special application to the professional, legal and ethical problems related to working with parents of exceptional children. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC
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An analysis of the role of the special education coordinator and supervisor. Particular attention will be given to: program development; planning, organizing, and delivering inservice training; personnel recruitment, selection, and evaluation; program management; and program evaluation. Students will relate the topical content to their specific area of expertise in special education. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725 and six additional semester hours in special education. LEC
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This course is designed to provide students a survey of disciplines which contribute to care and treatment of students with disabilities. Emphasis on professional roles, team participation, case management, and reporting and follow up. Disciplines include medicine, education, audiology, psychology, speech pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, music therapy and social work. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725. LEC
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This course is designed to be a culminating experience for Adaptive Program students who choose to complete their masters programs with a comprehensive masters examination instead of one of the other program options (i.e., project or thesis). Students will complete this course during the final semester of their programs. Participants will review current issues, evidence-based practices, home-school considerations, state and federal regulations, and Kansas standards regarding appropriate education for students with mild to moderate disabilities (i.e., Adaptive category designation). The course is a prerequisite for the departmental comprehensive examination in the Adaptive area. LEC
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Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH
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Theory and principles of behavioral analysis. Emphasis will be given to observation, measurement, recording, and visual display techniques. Other topics include maintenance and generalization of behavior change. Students will be provided experience in the design and carrying out of research studies related to exceptional children and youth using principles and methods of behavioral analysis. Prerequisite: SPED 425 or SPED 725 and SPED 839. LEC
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This course is designed to provide principles of development, needs assessment, evaluation and dissemination applied to curriculum products. Analysis of organizational and conceptual features of major curriculum development projects for students with disabilities are addressed; participants design curriculum procedures. Prerequisite: Twelve semester hours in special education and a general curriculum course. LEC
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Designed for individuals with responsibilities for the operation of instructional resource centers and educational programs serving exceptional children and youth. Experiences relate to: selection, acquisition, circulation, and management of special education instructional media/materials and the delivery of inservice training specific to their skills. Prerequisite: Professional preparation and/or experience in the Education of Exceptional Children and Youth and C&I 616, Introduction to Educational Communications. LEC
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The organization of this course follows the chronology of an individual's total development from genetic origin through fetal development, perinatal, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Emphasis is given to etiology and implications of handicapping conditions on development. Attention is given to prevention, treatment, and habilitation or rehabilitation of various conditions. Prerequisite: SPED 725. LEC
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This course is concerned with the relationship between professions and society in a democracy, and specifically, with the ethics and practices associated with the professions of education, special education, and other disability-related fields. Models of professionalism are compared and advantages of civic professionalism for individuals with disabilities and their families, the professions, and society as a whole are explored. Lessons drawn from disagreements over questions such as the nature and social consequences of the professions are used to broaden understanding of what professionalism could and should be in a democracy. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program. LEC
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An extensive analysis of the literature and research pertinent to issues in a given disability. Separate sections are organized for various disabilities. Students may enroll in more than one section as a part of a graduate program. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to prepare administrators and prospective administrators for organizing and administering educational programs for students with disabilities. Major topics include a review of current trends in special education, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal and financing aspects of special education, program planning, and administration of special services. (Same as ELPS 959.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of education including educational psychology and SPED 725. LEC
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This course is designed to assist first-year special education doctoral students organize and synthesize a conceptual and substantive map of the field of special education and introduce them to corresponding faculty research interests and resources. Emphasis is placed on the academic writing expectations and resources of the field, university, and department, and on building a cohort of students to address common issues and to provide a foundation for peer support throughout the doctoral program. Prerequisite: Admission to special education doctoral program or permission of instructor. LEC
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This capstone seminar is designed to assist advanced doctoral students synthesize and evaluate information on a broad range of current and historically significant special education issues and trends in preparation for comprehensive examinations and future professional roles. Substantively, its primary focus is issues and trends that affect the entire field or cut across several areas of study and practice. Its secondary focus is significant issues and trends that affect particular categorical or functional sub-areas of study and practice within the field. Prerequisite: Completion of nine doctoral courses in special education, including 4 of 6 departmental Core courses. LEC
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This doctoral level course will explore current issues related to characteristics, educational methods and curricula, and questions, problems, concerns and movements connected to the education of children and youth with learning disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC
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Advanced development of conceptual and practical field-based skills. Prerequisite: SPED 775. FLD
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This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to engage in an extensive analysis of the literature and research pertinent to critical issues in the field of learning and behavioral exceptionality. Prerequisite: SPED 970 LD/BD Issues I; SPED 972 Trends and Issues in Special Education I. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC
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This course is designed to provide students with an overview of seminal leadership and systems change literature. Students analyze and apply the literature at the teacher, family, school building, district, state, and federal levels. Strategies for developing and mobilizing stakeholders to support the process of change will be covered. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program. LEC
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This course is designed to give students an introduction and overview of academic life and the roles and responsibilities of an academic career. Its primary purpose is to help develop a realistic perspective of the expectations of academic life and the competencies required for a successful start in an academic career. Organized around the broad themes of understanding the academy, faculty life and work, and academic career paths, course content addresses the roles and responsibilities of faculty life in different types of institutions and the issues faculty face as they pursue their academic careers. The course offers an opportunity for students to critically review their doctoral program in the context of preparing them for a successful start in an academic career and to explore options for academic career choices. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission. LEC
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This course is designed to teach a broad array of strategies associated with the development of successful proposals that will generate funds to support programmatic work. Among the topics covered in this course are sources of funding, strategies for conceptualizing and writing proposals, collaboration strategies, proposal peer-review process, and integrating proposal development activities into other professional responsibilities. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program and PRE 710. LEC
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This is an interprofessional course in public policy and school reform that is concerned with current policy and systems transformations in education and child/family services, including educational, social and health service systems and the movement toward school-linked service integration strategies and family partnerships, called the "community school" movement. Issues connected with comprehensive school reform including the role of special education and mental health in this process will be emphasized. Particular emphasis will be placed on urban, multicultural issues affecting community schools. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to develop skills in naturalistic or constructivist research, while situating it theoretically within the broader framework of modern and postmodern social inquiry, and exploring its social, political and ethical implications. The course develops students' skills in using this form of interpretive qualitative research, provides a theoretical framework for selecting inquiry paradigms, compares and contrasts positivist and constructivist inquiry, and reviews social and political implications of constructivist inquiry. Prerequisite: Six hours of statistics, measurement, and/or large or small group research design. LEC
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The course examines the opportunities, challenges, cautions, and demands of web-based instruction in higher education. It explores the policy implications of web-based instruction, development of collaborative teaming skills utilizing telecommunications resources, and the design and technical aspects of online instruction. Particular attention is given to the implications of online instruction for accommodating needs presented by diverse learners through strategies such as universal designs. Prerequisite: Admission to doctoral program or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a detailed examination of research methods for advancing knowledge and validating hypothetically useful treatments in situations in which sufficient sample sizes to conduct formal experiments are lacking, the question of interest is better addressed by multiple observations of treatment effects over time, and/or the question is best addressed by taking a variety of observations of a single unit of interest. Specifically, two small sample research methods will be examined in depth with examples and practical application experience: interrupted time series design for small samples ("single case" design), and Yin's empirical case study method. Prerequisite: Doctoral program admission or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on analyzing and synthesizing research literature focusing on intermediate outcomes (e.g., family-professional partnerships) and long-term outcomes (e.g., family quality of life) related to families of children, youth, and adults with disabilities. Key family theories are discussed and applied in the development and implementation of interventions that have potential to increase intermediate and long-term family outcomes. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC
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This seminar examines research to support evidence-based practices that currently exist in the areas of early intervention and early childhood special education. The primary objective is to learn how to read and critically analyze studies that form the evidence base for several early intervention and early childhood special education practices. Primary goals of the class include the development of skills for evaluating research studies in early intervention and early childhood special education, and increasing knowledge of evidence-based practices in the early intervention literature. Prerequisite: Three courses in special education or permission of instructor. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. Instructors conduct regular observations and conference with students. Written summaries and evaluations of field experiences are prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the instructor. Open only to advanced students and field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD
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This course is designed to prepare students for college teaching. Enrolled students shall engage in semester-long, planned, instruction that includes college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with a member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. FLD
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Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH
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An introduction to the acoustic structure of speech intended for nonscience majors. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which scientists measure and evaluate the physical characteristics of speech. Topics will include: simple harmonic motion, the propagation of sound waves, aerodynamic aspects of vocal fold vibration, resonance, digital speech processing, frequency analysis, and speech synthesis. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. (Same as LING 120.) Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 104 or equivalent. LEC
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Provides a general understanding of normal and deviant speech, language, and hearing in adults and children. This course considers the normal development of communication behavior, the nature of communication disorders, and the interaction of speech pathology and audiology with allied fields (e.g., education, medicine, psychology, special education). LEC
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The neural bases of human communication are introduced. Basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are discussed, with particular emphasis on how they relate to the study of speech, language, and hearing. Methodologies used to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of human communication are also introduced. LEC
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Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an inter-disciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as LING 418, PHIL 418, and PSYC 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as ANTH 447, BIOL 432, PSYC 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC
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Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as ANTH 449, BIOL 449, and PSYC 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD
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Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) LEC
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Introduction to classification of American English speech sounds based on articulatory phonetics. Practice in phonetic transcription and analysis of normal and abnormal speech. Laboratory exercises to give students hands-on experience with selected topics from lecture. Prerequisite or Corequisite: SPLH 120. LEC
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Introduction to structure/function of human languages as it relates to language development and disorders; processes involved in the expression and reception of language and the methodologies employed to study these processes. LEC
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(Eight hours maximum credit, which may be distributed through four semesters. No student may enroll for less than two hours credit.) Study may be directed toward either reading for integration of knowledge and insight in Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, or original research, i.e., a specific problem in the field. Student must complete a written report at the end of each semester detailing the work on their project during the semester. Prerequisite: Consent of Departmental Honors Coordinator. IND
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(A maximum of six hours of credit may be counted, with not more than four in a single area of study.) Investigation of a special topic or project selected by the student with advice, approval, and supervision of an instructor. Such study may take the form of directed reading or special research. Individual reports and conferences. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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The study of the analysis of language produced by children with respect to its phonological, lexical, morphological, syntactic, and pragmatic characteristics. Prerequisite or corequisite: SPLH 566. LAB
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Study of language acquisition in children, including phonologic, morphologic, syntactic, and semantic components. Methods of language measurement, the role of comprehension, and pragmatic aspects of language use are included. May be taught in lecture or online format. LEC
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An introduction to basic concepts of scientific methodology and of statistical and psychophysical measurement. Study of the application of these concepts to research in speech, language, and hearing. The complimentary nature of the research process and the clinical process will be emphasized. Graduate students who take this course must complete additional requirements. LEC
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Survey of the physiology of speech production, and the physics of sound. Emphasis upon methodologies in the laboratory study of normal speech. Prerequisite: SPLH 120 and SPLH 320, or concurrent enrollment in SPLH 120 and SPLH 320, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Concepts and principles relevant to the normal hearing processes: gross anatomy, psychophysical methods, and basic subjective correlates of the auditory system. Prerequisite: SPLH 120 and SPLH 320, or concurrent enrollment in SPLH 120 and SPLH 320,or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to methods for assessing and treating hearing disorders in adults and children, as well as conditions that result in hearing loss. Course includes clinical observation and extensive hands-on experience with clinical techniques. Prerequisite: SPLH 663. LEC
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Testing of hearing using pure tone air and bone conduction tests with both normal and hearing-impaired individuals. (Same as AUD 550.) Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in SPLH 669. FLD
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This course provides training in clinical management of communicative disorders in children and adults. Principles of evaluation, application of diagnostic information, intervention planning, intervention process, data collection and application, report writing, and interactions with parents and other professionals are examined. Participation in observation and laboratory activities is required. LEC
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Clinical practice with children and adults. Group and individual conferences with staff required. Repeatable once for credit. Prerequisite: SPLH 671 and consent of instructor. FLD
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Concepts and principles relevant to the perception of speech with emphasis on the auditory system; acoustics, psychophysical methods, and basic subjective correlates of speech perception. Prerequisite: SPLH 662 and SPLH 663, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Study of the communication problems associated with hearing loss. Introduction to aural habilitative intervention related to speech, language, and academic achievement in children with early hearing loss, as well as, communication strategies training for adults with acquired hearing loss. Prerequisite: SPLH 669 or equivalent. LEC
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The subject matter of this seminar will be special topics from speech pathology and audiology. Special prerequisite may be established for a given topic. LEC
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A weekly forum for students and faculty to discuss professional issues and interdisciplinary research in communication and aging. May be repeated for credit. (Same as COMS 784.) (Same as PSYC 784.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Students are graded S/F. (Same as ABSC 797, LING 799 and PSYC 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) LEC
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Study of language acquisition in children, including the morphologic, syntactic, and semantic components. Methods of language measurement, the role of comprehension, and pragmatic aspects of language use will be included. Not open to students who have credit for SPLH 566. Laboratory by appointment. LEC
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Focuses on speech and non-speech characteristics of children with developmental phonological disorders. Emphasis placed on collection and phonetic transcription of speech samples, phonological analysis of transcribed data, and decision-making processes in assessment and intervention. LEC
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This course describes the neuroanatomic bases of motor-speech processes, the diagnosis, classification, assessment, prognosis, and treatment of dysarthria(s) and apraxia(s). LEC
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The nature of stuttering in children and adults is discussed. Theories regarding etiology, development, and maintenance of the disorder are presented. Emphasis is placed on various clinical approaches to assessment, measurement, and treatment. LEC
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This course reviews the function of the laryngeal and respiratory mechanisms including the parameters and processes of phonation. Primary content addresses diagnosis, description, and treatment of organic and non-organic disorders of phonation. LEC
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This course reviews anatomy and physiology of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Diagnosis and management of velopharyngeal dysfunction and associated problems considered. Anatomy, physiology, and rehabilitation associated with certain oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal abnormalities discussed. Emphasis is on the speech problems of adults following medical management. Populations include individuals with laryngectomies, glosectomies, and tracheotomies. LEC
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This course covers normal and disordered swallowing. Evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders, the dysphagia team, and dysphagia in special populations are considered. LEC
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This course focuses on the description, assessment, and treatment of communication problems associated with particular genetic syndromes (e.g., Down's, Turner's syndromes). Also covered are current data about the genetic factors involved in nonsyndromic communication and learning problems, such as those commonly seen in the schools. Ethical and practical issues in these areas are discussed. LEC
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This course examines factors relating to language disorders in the birth to three population. At-risk populations, as well as those with known etiologies, are considered. Information on assessment, intervention, and service delivery models is addressed. Issues relating to Public Law 99-457 are also examined. LEC
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This course examines language disorders of preschool-age children in the late preschool years. The course includes information on incidence, characteristics, assessment, and intervention. Theoretical issues and their implication for language intervention are also examined. LEC
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This course examines language development during the school years and how problems in this development interact with school performance. Emphasis is placed on the role of the speech-language pathologist in the early identification, assessment, and remediation of language-learning problems. LEC
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Neurological aspects of language processes, classification of aphasia, and assessment of language deficits are discussed. Management approaches including intervention strategies and rehabilitation are also considered. LEC
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This course focuses on the unique language impairments of individuals with mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy, hearing impairments, dual sensory impairments, and other communication disorders (e.g., ADD). Language characteristics as well as assessment and intervention strategies are studied. LEC
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Neuroanatomy and physiology relevant to diffuse brain injury are discussed. Characteristics and intervention strategies relating to traumatic brain injury and dementia are studied. LEC
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This course describes augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) assessment and intervention issues as they apply to children and adults with both congenital and acquired speech and/or language disabilities. Areas of study include AAC systems, assessment strategies and procedures, intervention strategies, and AAC information resources. LEC
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This course addresses the perceptual, linguistic, and cognitive processes utilized in written communication. Acquired and developmental disorders of written language are examined in relation to issues concerning characteristics, etiology, early identification, assessment, and remediation. LEC
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Provides a general framework for speech and language evaluations. Issues related to initiation and termination of treatment are discussed. Practice is provided in evaluating norm- and criterion-referenced information used in diagnostic, referral, and treatment decisions. LEC
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This seminar is concerned with the design, instrumentation, execution, and reporting of research in audiology and speech pathology. SPLH 760 or its equivalent and some statistics are recommended before entering this seminar. LEC
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Orients student to clinical procedures, policies, requirements, and expectations of program. Therapy models, planning, and philosophies are discussed along with implementation and evaluation of therapy procedures. Professional issues are also considered. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Students conduct supervised clinical work in a variety of settings. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Department approval. Group and individual conferences with staff required. FLD
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