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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An introduction to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) including the need for project management, phases of the project life cycle, tools and techniques for planning (PERT, CPM), and the role of team work and communication. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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This course will focus on the specifications through implementation phase of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) at an advanced level including technical design, coding and testing, problem management, systems testing, implementation and post-implementation. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Introduces the student to the basic Object Oriented (OO) terminology and how OO differs from a procedural approach. It details the deliverables that are created in the analysis and design phase using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Students will also learn to use a CASE tool to document the analysis and design deliverables. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Survey of elements of systems architecture including types of architecture, quality attributes, design patterns and frameworks, deployment issues, and developing architecture plans. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in saxophone. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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For graduate students majoring in saxophone. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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A study of repertoire and performance techniques from the saxophone's inception to 1950. LEC
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A study of repertoire and extended performance techniques from 1950 to the present. LEC
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Individual instruction. Open only to students who have been admitted to the D.M.A. curriculum in saxophone. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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Maximum seven hours credit. THE
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to the candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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This course presents a historical survey of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. In a comparative framework, the course focuses on a variety of central aspects that shaped Scandinavia from the Viking Age to the present. LEC
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This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as EURS 510.) LEC
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Intensive study of one or more major authors from the literatures of Scandinavia. May be repeated. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in Scandinavian languages and linguistics. The course deals with the linguistic analysis of language rather than the acquisition of a particular language. May be repeated. Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor is required. RSH
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Introduction to the grammar and reading of the prose literature of the "saga-age" (1100-1350). Varied selections from the literature provide the context in which the language is discussed. LEC
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Intensive discussion of a single longer saga or several shorter works, or a combination of these on a single theme. Dialectal differences between W. Norse and older Germanic dialects will be noted. Prerequisite: SCAN 906. LEC
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Introduces some of the most widely used models from management science in business decision making. Topics include decision making under uncertainty, resource allocation models, and production and operations management. (Formerly DSCI 310). Prerequisite: Prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 301 and IST 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of supply chain management topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the student to supply chain management. Students are presented the key concepts of supply chain management, the application of these concepts and are provided with the managerial knowledge of supply chain management through class discussions and case studies. Students discover the impact of information technologies, strategic alliances and logistics on supply chain management and the performance implication of supply chain management. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiations and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging, and materials handling. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions, processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding ERP systems as solutions to integration. (Same as IST 401.) Prerequisite: SCM 401 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Integrating and apply the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, projects, and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 401 and IST 301. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is concerned with the analysis and interpretation of data encountered in business and economics. One goal of the course is to develop skills in the analysis of data that can be used to solve problems students are likely to encounter on the job. The course attempts to develop an attitude toward data analysis that can be usefully applied in a wide variety of real life situations. A variety of statistical tools are covered. In particular, the multiple regress model is covered with an emphasis on how the model can be used in situations involving economic data. Data analysis techniques are illustrated with examples and case studies using computers. This course is in the management sciences and operations management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Design, develop, and use computer decision models for analysis of supply chain operations; computer intensive coursework emphasizing spreadsheet applications. Prerequisite: SCM 401. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as FIN 460.) Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to build the conceptual framework which drives an organization striving to operate in a customer-focused mode. This requires an integration of basic principles of marketing and operations in order to define the value-added in each of an organization's products and/or services, to use this information to define the value-added in work, and to use this definition to improve the actual work. To do this effectively, requires leadership, empowerment, focused data, and a system view. The basic principles of each requirement will be discussed as well as their integration into a unified whole. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310) and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and practical implementation of customer relationship management (CRM) strategies using marketing databases. Topics include: fundamentals of CRM strategy, RFM analysis, LTV metrics, logit models, decision tress, hazard models techniques for evaluating model performance (e.g., lift charts, ROC) and applications to campaign management. In keeping with the hands-on nature of the course, students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools. (Same as MKTG 465.) Prerequisite: DSCI 301 and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in supply chain management not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. RSH
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This course introduces the principles and practices for designing and managing integrated supply chain operations, focusing on the flow of products, services, information, and funds between firms. The interrelationships among customer service, supply management, inventory management and logistics are investigated. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: DSCI 701. LEC
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This course involves the study of supply management. Topics covered include the purchasing process, the role of the procurement function within the company, and the evaluation, selection and development of suppliers. The course is also designed to emphasize the importance of negotiation and managing contracts. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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This course discusses the area of physical distribution management of supply chains. Attention is given to managerial responsibilities such as network design, transportation methods, inventory management, warehousing, packaging and materials handling. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. We will evaluate the functions processes and data requirements of business functions in an integrated framework. The objectives of the course include (1) understanding data needs of different business functions; (2) understanding alternative information systems solutions and the problems in independent information systems and; (3) understanding (ERP) systems as solution to integration. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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Integrating and applying the theories, concepts, and methods taken in previous supply chain management courses through the use of readings, case studies, project and industry speakers. Prerequisite: SCM 701. Enrollment restricted to Fort Leavenworth officers. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of supply chain management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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Introduction to sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LAB
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Course to be offered in an area of studio activity of specific interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104, or permission of instructor. LAB
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A course in foundry techniques as related to sculpture. Both traditional and experimental procedures for casting bronze, aluminum, and iron sculpture will be explored. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB
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The course will present a variety of techniques for fabricating metal sculpture. Oxyacetylene and electric arc welding processes will be included. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB
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Continuation of SCUL 253. Prerequisite: SCUL 253. LAB
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Continuation of SCUL 354. Prerequisite: SCUL 354. LAB
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Continuation of SCUL 253. Prerequisite: SCUL 253; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Continuation of SCUL 354 or SCUL 358. Prerequisite: SCUL 354 or SCUL 358; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Sculpture courses, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of SCUL 355. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 355. LAB
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Continuation of SCUL 355 or SCUL 359. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SCUL 355 or SCUL 359; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours can apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Sculpture courses, or permission of instructor. IND
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Continuation of SCUL 556. Prerequisite: SCUL 556. LAB
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Continuation of SCUL 657. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 657. LAB
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Individual research in sculpture: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 559 and permission of instructor. RSH
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Individual research in sculpture. Prerequisite: SCUL 658. RSH
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Individual research in sculpture: course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: SCUL 804 and permission of instructor. RSH
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Continuation of SCUL 859. Prerequisite: SCUL 859. RSH
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First semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. Simple readings from selected texts. Course may be used to teach the fundamentals of any Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, etc. LEC
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Second semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. A continuation of SLAV 104 in those languages whose fundamentals were being taught in SLAV 104. Prerequisite: SLAV 104 or equivalent (in same language). LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 108 (in same language). LEC
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Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 204 or equivalent (in same language). LEC
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This course presents an introduction to the study of the culture of the South Slavs and other peoples of Southeastern Europe, combining background modules in geography, linguistic culture, history, folklore and contemporary cultural criticism with critical 16 viewings of artistic films. The course serves as an introduction to humanistic inquiry about the peoples and cultures of Southeastern Europe. LEC
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This course is similar in content to SLAV 316, but with an additional honors project. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to the university Honors Program. LEC
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Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as JWSH 318.) LEC
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An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. LEC
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An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A broad exposure, both theoretical and practical, to various aspects of the traditional native culture of a particular Slavic country or ethnic group, including folk dance, song and musicianship, as well as forms of the material culture such as folk architecture, costumes and art in everyday life. Taught in the pertinent Slavic country in conjunction with the appropriate language course. LEC
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Independent study and preparation of honors thesis. Required of all students working for a degree with honors in Slavic languages and literatures. IND
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Study and discussion of contemporary problems in Russia and the former Soviet Union; readings in Russian, based on articles in newspapers, journals, etc. Conducted in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or equivalent. LEC
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An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of Russian cultural and societal development in the modern era. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Majors and graduate students in Slavic languages and literatures will be required to do readings in Russian. LEC
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The course is designed to acquaint students with the shifting manner of public discourse in Post-Soviet Russia and help them to explore in some depth cross-cultural communication between America and Russia. In addition to contemporary and historical background on Russian communicative practices, students examine discourse in business development, mass media, marketing, and advertising. All readings in English. (Same as COMS 503). LEC
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An interdisciplinary course introducing the student to the principal features of East-Central European cultural and societal development in the modern era. Countries that may be considered are: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, the South Slavic countries, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Belorussia, and Ukraine. LEC
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This study-abroad trip offers a survey of Czech art, architecture, literature, theater, and film from the medieval period to the present with emphasis on the late 19th and 20th centuries. Combines 18 hours of lectures on campus and a ten-day trip to Prague. LEC
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A survey of West Slavic Literature and Civilization (Polish and Czech) from its beginnings to the present with emphasis on the most important trends: Renaissance, Romanticism, Positivism/Realism, Modernism and Avant-guard; Socialist realism, and Post-modernism. The course combines lecture, discussion and small group activities. Movie clips, recordings, and slides are used to reflect various cultural dimensions of West Slavic Civilization. No knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC
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An introductory survey of the literature and culture of the South Slavic peoples: the Slovenes, Croats, Bosniacs, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians and Bulgarians. No language required. LEC
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Topics and problems in Russian cultural history as treated in the masterworks of Russian literature. Readings selected from the works of Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Solzhenitsyn, and other great Russian writers. Readings in English, no prerequisite for non-Russian majors. Russian majors will do some of the readings in Russian. LEC
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The course asks how fiction written in Central Europe engaged and grappled with the totalitarian experience imposed by Nazi and Soviet forms of government. The course focuses on the works by 20th-century Polish, Czech, and Hungarian writers that deal with totalitarianism. (Same as HWC 514.) LEC
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A comparative study of several most representative and best works of 19th- and 20th-century Polish and Czech fiction and drama and their film adaptations. By providing a broad cultural and historical background of the works, the course offers a thorough introduction to modern culture of Poland and the Czech Republic. Readings and discussions are in English, and no knowledge of Polish or Czech is required. LEC
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An analysis of the phonological and morphological systems of contemporary standard Russian, including normative and dialectal pronunciation of speech sounds, phonemics, morphophonemic alterations, and nominal and verbal inflections. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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This course covers the main grammatical categories of Russian, including word formation, case, animacy, voice and reflexive verbs, imperatives, aspect, and word order. It is intended not only for linguists but anyone seeking a better understanding of the grammatical systems of Russian. Designed as a continuation of SLAV 520. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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An examination of changes in the Russian language during the course of this century. Topics covered include changes in pronunciation, morphological and syntactic variation, and the impact of foreign borrowings, particularly from English. Graduate students enrolled in this course will be held to a more stringent curriculum and grading system. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian language study or the equivalent. LEC
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The course is intended as an introduction to the most significant writers and works in Slavic literatures. The emphasis will be on some of the themes and ideological concepts that have shaped the literatures of the Slavic world. Representative works of Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Mrozek, Rozewicz, Capek, Hasek, Djilas, Havel, Ivo Andric and others, will be studied. The diversity of expression and, at the same time, homogeneity of spirit in the works of these writers will be stressed. No knowledge of Slavic languages is required. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of Russian versification and to masterpieces of Russian poetry selected from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Students will learn to read, translate, and analyze poems in terms of rhyme, meter, euphony, metaphor, and other prosodic features. Emphasis will be placed upon preparing students for independent study and appreciation of Russian poetry in the original. Prerequisite: Language proficiency. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Fyodor Dostoevsky. In translation. No prerequisite. LEC
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A study of the life and works of Leo Tolstoy. In translation. LEC
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