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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Application of the principles of epidemiology and the techniques of statistical analysis to the solution of epidemiologic problems. Emphasis will be placed on theory and application of various statistical techniques in the analysis of epidemiological data. Students will be oriented toward application and interpretation of various methodologies. Skills necessary for thesis preparation will also be addressed. Prerequisite: PRVM 800, SAS, or PRVM 814. LEC
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This course will concentrate on concepts and application of various statistical techniques in the analysis of epidemiological data. Topics include: 1) design of studies, 2) evaluation of data, 3) analysis of cohort studies, 4) clinical trials, and 5) community trials. Students will be oriented toward application and interpretation of various methodologies. Prerequisite: PRVM 800, PRVM 802, SAS Programming, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Obesity is becoming epidemic and pandemic throughout the world. What are the personal public health consequences of this phenomenon? Are we as focused as we should be on the effects of this growing problem? This course reviews the basic definition of obesity and defines its known personal and public health effects: including issues of bias and stigmatization. The course further examines the epidemiology, and future predicated consequences of obesity and then examines personal models of treatment followed by examination of public health efforts to date. Finally, proposed interventions and areas for research are discussed and evaluated. Students apply principles of behavioral change and communication to develop proposed public health approaches to ameliorating the obesity problem in children and adults. Prerequisite: PRVM 800: Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 818: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course will demonstrate an understanding of the difference between health care and medical care and the place of medical care in the economic system; the role of social values and economic principles in societal decision making and the utilization of health care services; the role of NEED in the utilization of health care services; the public and private financing of the health care system; the organization of resources and types of managed care systems; the unique payment and the reimbursement mechanisms in the health care system; and the role of government in the health care system. LEC
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This course provides students with a broad range of contemporary research and writtings in the area of cultural competence in public health as it relates to health disparities and health interventions. Specific attention will be paid to examining self-awareness, developing cross-cultural competence, and identifying and utilizing culturally appropriate strategies in health promotion and prevention. Students emerge from this course with an understanding of how culture operates as a critical variable in health behaviors, planning health promotion and disease prevention strategies, and in addressing health disparities. LEC
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This course is designed to explore the application of economic theories, principles and concepts to the U.S. medical care system. Students will demonstrate an understanding of: the difference between health care and medical care and the place of medical care in the economic system; the role of social values in economic principles and societal decision making; the determinants of supply and demand of medical care services with particular attention to the relationship between supplier and demand and need and demand; complements and substitutes as they apply to medical care services; the unique nature of the medical care product; the interrelatedness of markets; the principles of and demand for health insurance and its role in the demand for medical care services; the role of government in the medical care system. LEC
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Qualitative research has diverged from its anthropology roots to become commonplace in marketing, business, clinical and public health settings. This course is focused to basic qualitative methodologies with applications in public health, health services research, health behavior, and quality improvement. This course reviews and gives real practice with strategic planning, choice of methods, logistics, and integration with quantitative methods. Students will receive hands-on experience with logistics and actual data collection using several methods. Students will present and discuss recent journal articles reporting qualitative studies in weekly "journal club" fashion. Students will present the results of their qualitative research in an oral class presentation and poster, and in an abstract submitted to a local, regional or national conference. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Epidemiology of major malignant disease is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the identification of populations at risk, etiologic factors and foreseeable methods of prevention. Relevant information on tumor biology, immunology, and viral, chemical and physical carcinogenesis is presented. Problems unique to epidemiologic investigation of cancers are discussed. Epidemilogical methodology is stressed. Prerequisite: PRVM 800. LEC
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This course is designed to prepare public health leaders to live and work in a world of laws, and to play an active and effective role in policy making and analysis. Students will understand the source of national, state, and local statutes and regulations and understand the role of common law. Students will understand the policy process at the national, state, and local level, and develop skills analyzing legislation and influencing policy decisions. Students will understand the rule making process at the national and state level. LEC
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This course examines the health and social needs of population groups with higher-than-average risk of disease, disability, and negative social outcomes. Such groups include low-income racial and ethnic minorities, urban adolescents, people in jails/prisons, the homeless, drug users, sex workers, immigrants, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The course utilizes the disciplines of social epidemiology and medical sociology to explore the individual, community, and structural-level determinants of health and implications for health care. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to engage research trainees in reading about, considering, and discussing the responsible conduct of science. The course is designed as an option for meeting current federal regulations, which require that all NIH training grants provide training in the responsible conduct of research. This course provides a concise overview of key subject areas in the responsible conduct of research. It is designed to make students aware of relevant guidelines, policies and codes relating to ethical research, as well as to provide the skills for identifying and resolving ethical conflicts that may arise in research. LEC
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Social and social-psychological processes that shape the experience of mental health and illness and the consequences of disorders for individuals, families, and communities will be examined. Theories of systems, evidence-based treatment, epidemiologic research, diverse populations, mental health consequences of disaster and terrorism, and systems of care and change. Students will become familiar with the role of mental health risk and protective factors in the promotion of well-being. Through critical review and discussion of selected readings in this area, students will consider the implications of mental health and illness as a community or public health issue. Students will be evaluated on critical thinking and evaluation skills through written assignments and projects designed to demonstrate their ability to identify and integrate key elements of mental health theory and research. RSC
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Seminar in Women's Health is a 3 credit elective, graduate level course focusing on gender issues that are relevant in treatment approaches to various health issues, the differing health status of minority women, the evolvement of women's health to include the entire life span and areas other than reproduction, the changing implications of health care and policy and men in women's health. No prerequisite. LEC
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This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students the basic methods of conducting and evaluating community-based participatory research (CBPR). Students will be introduced to the five phases of CBPR, including partnership formation and maintenance, community assessment and diagnosis, defining the issue, documentation and evaluation of partnerships, and feedback, interpretation, and evaluation of partnerships. In addition, students will learn how to find funding mechanisms and journals that are appropriate for CBPR, as well as some of the key factors in writing about CBPR. Students will be introduced to a variety of examples of well-done CBPR and will learn what makes it different from other types of research done in community settings. PREREQUISITES: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health or permission of instructor. LEC
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The course is designed to introduce participants to Motivational Interviewing, its concepts, and to the subsequent skills required for helping people to change. This course will be cross-listed with DN 857. LEC
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The Public Health in Film course will allow students the opportunity to address multiple public health issues throughout time via educational films and public health documentaries and discussion. Specific issues will include, but will not be limited to: polio, leprosy, cholera, tuberculosis, the bubonic plague, influenza, bioterrorism and natural disasters. LEC
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This course will provide an overview of tobacco as a public health problem and tobacco politics. Students will learn about the pharmacology of nicotine, the mechanisms leading to tobacco addiction and biologic factors that affect pharmacology and tobacco use such as the menstrual cycle and comorbid illnesses such as depression and others. Public health approaches to preventing tobacco use initiation will be studied, including which initiatives are most effective. State-of-the-art methods to assist smokers to quit will be reviewed, including pharmacologic interventions, counseling by health professionals and education/motivation support. Barriers to obtaining services will be explored, such as educational needs among various types of helth professionals, and access to care in rural areas or among clients with certain types of health insurance. LEC
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Comparative analysis of the demographic, geographic, and economic structure of various types of communities in Western and non-Western societies. Relationships between these compositional elements of a given community, its food and nutrition resources and services, and the nutritional status of its members. Development of alternative strategies for resource expansion and/or for delivering appropriate nutritional services to target communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Through lectures, tabletop exercises, and invited speakers, the course content will include the following topics: terminology and core competencies, public health infrastructure, collaboration and communication, roles and responsibilities, psychological effects of terrorism, agricultural and zoonotic bioterrorism, law enforcements and public health, epidemiology of BT diseases (including agent specific lectures), burn injuries, risk communication, Strategic National Stockpile (SNS), National Incident Management System (NIMS), public health law as related to bioterrorism, and public health laboratory response related to bioterrorism. LEC
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This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of the biopsychosocial factors that contribute to disparities in health and health care. This course will also review strategies developed to reduce health disparities. Prerequisite: PRVM 818 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health is recommended. LEC
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Historically reviews the HIV pandemic to evaluate lessons learned in prevention and treatment of the disease and successes and failures of public policies to reduce the impact of HIV in various countries. Critically analyzes HIV prevention interventions (voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, promotion of safer sex practices, clean needle exchange, methadone or buprenorphine programs, treatment with antiretroviral therapy, pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis, vaccine and microbicide development) and challenges with their implementation. LEC
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Lectures and small group discussions explore public health ethics, social justice and autonomy as they relate to public health practice and health policy. Current issues in health policy are discussed including: the right to health and health care, bioterrorism, and health inequalities, poverty and power. Weekly small group discussions include cases on MCHP, obesity and "fat taxes," resource allocation, and disparities in infant mortality. Student evaluation is based on class participation, a small group project, and a final paper based upon a case study addressing ethical issues relevant to the student's area of public health specialization. LEC
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Political, economic, and methodologic issues that affect health care quality and outcome measurement will be discussed and analyzed in this seminar. Visiting faculty experts in outcomes research and management will present models for health care outcomes assessment and evaluation. (Same as HP&M 876 and NRSG 888.) LEC
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This is a survey course that will provide a broad, practical understanding of some important local, state, and federal environmental statutes, regulations, and case law. This course will cover the fundamentals of environmental law, examining the history, development, and current status of environmental law and federalism in the United States. Environmental Law is designed to introduce the student to a variety of important environmental challenges addressed by environmental laws and policy issues surrounding environmental problems as well as the legal complexities of environmental regulatory and administrative schemes. Prerequisite: PRVM 830 Environmental Health. LEC
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This course will examine the various techniques and analytical methods to measure environmental contamination in air, water, soils, and food in both indoor and outdoor environments. Students will learn to use measurement devices and instrumentation typically used to measure and analyze these environmental contaminants. They will also learn to interpret the data and model contaminant levels in the environment and will use this data to model likely human exposures. Environmental Monitoring and Exposure Assessment is critical to the assessment of environmental hazards and identifying exposure risk to individuals and populations. The course will focus on standard sampling and analytical techniques that have been developed to assess contaminant levels, quality assurance, data analysis, pathways of exposure and the fate and transport of environmental contaminants. The course will also briefly discuss biomarkers as a tool to estimate exposure, dose or body burden, and the information they provide will be compared to and contrasted with measures of contaminant levels in the environment. Prerequisite: PRVM 830 Environmental Health. LEC
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This course combines instruction and practical exercises to move the participant step-by-step through all stages of planning programs, identifying funding sources, and writing grant proposals. Upon completion of the course, the student will have developed a quality proposal and be able to demonstrate skills in preparing grants. These will include: Development of fundable idea, Researching appropriate funding opportunities from foundations, corporations, and governmental sources; Finding grant information on the Internet; Reviewing federal grant applications, including NIH, NSF, and HRSA applications; Development of proposal elements and crafting a quality grant application; Review of certification and assurances required on grant applications; Review of evaluation and program outcome requirements on grant applications; Working with other participants in small groups to act as internal grant reviewers, responding to reviewers, and resubmitting grants. LEC
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Includes the mechanics of how to write clearly, focusing on mechanics, structure, and style. Students will practice specific strategies for writing effectively, with in depth attention paid to how ideas are distributed through well written sentences and paragraphs. Also includes editing and revision of writing for publication and grant submission. LEC
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This course will introduce students to basic toxicological concepts. Students will be provided opportunities to use these concepts to describe the underlying biochemical or physiological basis for health effects related to exposure to environmental toxicants and will practice interpreting the findings from student in the literature and critiquing studies. In the second part of the course students will learn the basic components of a health-based risk assessment and will practice applying these concepts by conducting a risk assessment. Prerequisites: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology and 830 Environmental Health and one semester of college-level biology. Completion or concurrent enrollment in PRVM 832 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology is recommended. Additional biology and chemistry courses may be helpful. LEC
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A 3 credit hour graduate level course concerning basic computing skills necessary for any advanced epidemiologic or administrative quantitative methods. This course covers basics of variable and dataset creation, building, maintenance and basic descriptive (not interpretive) analysis. The course is designed to be of use to students entering a variety of research, administrative and public health settings in public health, clinical and other fields. Software covered will include SAS, SPSS, Epi Info, KIPHS, Microsoft-EXCEL and ACCESS. The course can stand alone, or prepare students for Biostatistics and Epidemiology courses. Public data presentations will be stressed to prepare students to communicate about data with the lay public. LEC
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Several contemporary health reforms have rendered analyses of public payer data more feasible and valuable for population health, health services research, and quality improvement. The addition of an outpatient drug benefit to standard inpatient and outpatient service coverage for Medicare, for example, has stimulated a growth industry in comparative effectiveness research and expanded policy research across the health care system. Pending expansion of States' Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly create the largest public health care insurance program in the United States. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have streamlined researchers' access to national Medicare and Medicaid populations for health srevices and quality improvement projects through contracts with the Research Data Center at the University of Minnesota and the Chronic Condition Warehouse. In addition, Kansas Medicaid has invested in a Data Analytic Interface that offers ready access to our state's employees, Medicaid beneficiaries, and private health insurance claims data for enterprising researchers including tremendous opportunities for state of the art, contemporary policy analyses. This is indeed an exciting and opportune time for students embarking on careers in health services, policy, and population health research. This course is designed to prepare students for real world analyses using standard public payer claims data. LEC
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This course is focused on community health education and promotion, especially designing and evaluating health communication programs for populations with shared risks, exposures or behaviors. Ways in which the general public receives and assigns meaning to health messages will be reviewed. The strengths and weaknesses of specific health communication initiatives will be analyzed in terms of theoretical constructs, costs and outcomes. Students apply public health principles by designing a substantive health communication piece or educational material. Prerequisite: PRVM 800: Principles of Epidemiology and PRVM 818: Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health. Permission of instructor may be granted in lieu of these prerequisites. LEC
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This course examines techniques that are used in making clinical and management decisions when outcomes are uncertain. The course begins with a review of probabilistic decision making, then explores methods of analyzing choices with uncertain outcomes. stressing the use of decision trees and sensitivity analysis. The course examines cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, and cost benefit analysis. (Same as HP&M 872) LEC
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This graduate-level course covers principles and skills for financial and human resource management within public health organizations. It focuses on non-profit and public settings. Financial management topics include the principles and purposes of accounting, concepts related to finance, and financial strategic planning. Human resource management topics include job design and hiring, performance management, retention, compensation/benefits, legal issues, and termination. The focus of the course is twofold: 1) understanding the concepts behind financing and in gaining skills in interpreting and using financial information; 2) gaining skills in human resources management and resource development. The course is designed for people who are interested in public health administration, but should be useful to anyone with an interest in public health leadership in any setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. LEC
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This is a graduate-level course designed to teach students about current issues in American Indian health, as well as provide a basic historic context for understanding these issues. Students will read current literature from the academic journals and will be exposed to research being done today in American Indian communities, some of which has not yet been published. In addition, students will gain an understanding of what health disparaties exist in American Indian communities and some of the reasons why they exist, including access issues and other barriers to care, from both Western and Native points of view. Students will be exposed to some of the difficulties in conducting health research in Native communities and some of the more successful techniques to overcome barriers. Prerequisites: None. LEC
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This course provides students with an overview of performance improvement and management integrated within the core public health functions: assessment, policy development and assurance. It uses both theoretical and practical material to develop basic competencies necessary for performance management in community and public health settings. Key topics will include assessment tools and models, continuous quality improvement, evidence-based practice, performance improvement methods (epidemiologic measurement, measures of central tendency, problem identification and analysis, control charts) and the development of team-based problem solving and resolution. Prerequisite: PRVM 800 Principles of Epidemiology, PRVM 875 Management of Public Data; PRVM 827 Public Health Administration is preferred. LEC
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Research in community health, leading to the Master of Public Health degree. Prerequisite: PRVM 800, PRVM 818, BMTR 811/PRVM 804, and departmental approval. LEC
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Students will complete a practicum of at least 8 hours per week in a community health setting. (Same as NRSG 825.) Prerequisite: PRVM 800, PRVM 818, BMTR 811/PRVM 804, and permission of instructor. LEC
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Completion of a written project based on the community health practicum. The student will be examined orally over the methodology and content of the project. (This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.) Prerequisite: PRVM 891 and permission of instructor. LEC
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Preparation of a formal thesis based on the research conducted on a community health problem. After the thesis has been completed, the student will be given an oral examination on the research methods and content. Prerequisite: PRVM 890 and departmental approval. (This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.) THE
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Provides an overview of the discipline of psychology. Emphasizes developing an understanding of opportunities in psychology at the University of Kansas, exploring service-learning options related to the major, and helping students plan goals for their education through an understanding of their personal values and options within and outside the discipline. Open to KU-degree-seeking students only. Contact the Psychology Department to enroll in the course. Non-degree-seeking and non-KU students may enroll in the course by signing up with KU Continuing Education. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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A basic introduction to the science of psychology. LEC
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Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC
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An introductory survey of personality theories, development, assessment and current research. LEC
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Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the scientific "ways of knowing" employed by psychologists to discover the laws governing human behavior across a wide domain. The focus of the course is upon these methods and the statistical techniques that support them. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC
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An examination of the scientific "ways of knowing" employed by psychologists to discover the laws governing human behavior across a wide domain. The focus of the course is upon these methods and the statistical techniques that support them. Open to students in University and Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Not open to students taking PSYC 200. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Psychology. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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An introduction to statistical concepts and methods as they relate to analysis and interpretation of psychological data. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC
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An introduction to statistical concepts and methods as they relate to analysis and interpretation of psychological data. Open only to student in University and Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 210. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC
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An introduction to contemporary research and theory in human learning and memory, relevant perceptual processes, and higher functions such as language. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or equivalent placement. LEC
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Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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A survey course on the science and application of child and adolescent development; including physical, motoric, social, emotional, and cognitive changes from conception through adolescence. The course covers methods and theory, genetics, and may incorporate content on aggression, morality, parenting, media, and peers. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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A survey course on the science and application of child and adolescent development; including physical, motoric, social, emotional, and cognitive changes from conception through adolescence. The course covers methods and theory, genetics, and may incorporate content on aggression, morality, parenting, media, and peers. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors Programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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An examination of psychopathology including anxiety disorders, psycho-physiological disorders, affective disorders, and schizophrenic disorders. Disorders are considered from psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and biological perspectives. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Open to students in College or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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An introduction to the psychology of social behavior. Systematic consideration of such concepts as social influence, conformity and deviation, social attitudes and prejudice, socialization and personality, communication and propaganda, morale, and leadership. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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An introduction to the psychology of social behavior. Systematic consideration of such concepts as social influence, conformity and deviation, social attitudes and prejudice, socialization and personality, communication and propaganda, morale, and leadership. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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A survey of basic topics relating to the biological bases of behavior, including the physiology of neuronal and synaptic transmission, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology. This survey will be followed by lectures on selected topics within the area of brain and behavior such as motivation, appetite, reward, language, and left-right hemispheric differences. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Psychology, an introductory course in Biology and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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A survey of basic topics relating to the biological bases of behavior, including the physiology of neuronal and synaptic transmission, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology. This survey will be followed by lectures on selected topics within the area of brain and behavior such as motivation, appetite, reward, language, and left-right hemispheric differences. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology, an introductory course in biology and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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The organization and function of the nervous system as it relates to topics of interest to psychologists, including pain, anxiety, stress, sleep, depression, schizophrenia, akinetic and dyskinetic movement disorders, and senile dementia. Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology, an introductory course in biology, and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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The organization and function of the nervous system as it relates to topics of interest to psychologists, including pain, anxiety, stress, sleep, depression, schizophrenia, akinetic and dyskinetic movement disorders, and senile dementia. Open to students in University or Departmental Honors programs or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology, an introductory course in biology, and one of the following: PSYC 200, PSYC 201, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH 101, MATH 104 or exemption based on ACT or SAT score. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Psychology equivalent to courses at the 300 to 600 level at KU. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as ABSC 405 and THR 405.) LEC
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A survey of the nature and sources of differences in human behavior and a consideration of the consequences of these differences for society. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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A social psychological perspective on adult intimate relationships, examining friendship, dating, committed relationships, and the dissolution of committed relationships. Topics include romance, jealousy, self-disclosure, power, loneliness, and social support. Discussion of heterosexual and homosexual relationships, traditional forms (e.g., marriage) of relationships as well as alternative lifestyles (e.g. cohabitation) and gender-linked differences in relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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An interdisciplinary exploration of the social and cultural sources of self-experience. The first part of the course emphasizes a general process: how the development and experience of self, though it might seem essentially personal, is shaped by social interaction. The second part of the course highlights particular cases: how self-experience may be constructed differently depending on the particular social and cultural settings a person inhabits. Cases include influences of gender, socioeconomic status, and age group on the construction of self-experience within societies from around the world, and ethnic-identity groups within the USA. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an inter-disciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as LING 418, PHIL 418, and SPLH 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Clinical application of personality theories; personality development and assessment research. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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A basic survey course in the development of thinking and understanding in normal children. The course will cover Piaget's theory and information processing theories at the advanced undergraduate level. Topics include perception, attention, learning, memory, language, problem solving, and individual differences from birth to the mid-teens. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or ABSC/HDFL 160. LEC
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A survey of human behavioral genetics for upper division undergraduates. Emphasis is on how the methods and theories of quantitative, population, medical, and molecular genetics can be applied to individual and group differences in humans. Both normal and abnormal behaviors are covered, including intelligence, mental retardation, language and language disorders, communication, learning, personality, and psychopathology. (Same as ANTH 447, BIOL 432, SPLH 432.) Prerequisite: Introductory courses in biology/genetics or biological anthropology and psychology are recommended. LEC
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An introduction to social and personality development with consideration of both classic and contemporary theoretical viewpoints. The role of social contexts is considered (e.g., family, peers, communities), as well as biological influences (e.g., behavioral genetics). Topics include parent-infant attachment, peer relationships, aggression, etc. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Faculty supervised laboratory or field research for Human Biology majors. Students design and complete a research project in collaboration with a Human Biology faculty member. (Same as ANTH 449, BIOL 449, and SPLH 449.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and Human Biology major. FLD
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Study of human musical behavior, including basic psychoacoustic phenomena, musical taste, functional music, musical ability, cultural organization of musical sounds, and the affective response. Prerequisite: General Psychology, MEMT 370, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A seminar for juniors and seniors in the Honors Program in Psychology. Students who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Psychology may enroll for one credit for one or both semesters of their junior year and are required to enroll for two credits for both semesters in their senior year. IND
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This course covers a variety of theoretical views concerning the origins of stereotypes and the factors that maintain them, as well as how and when the revision of such beliefs take place. Analysis of various stereotypes (including gender and race) and the experience of prejudice across a variety of cultural contexts is examined. Many difficult social issues are discussed in depth. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or PSYC 361; or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the psychological theories about women; similarities and differences in behavior of women and men; the effects of biological and social factors on the behavior of women and men; and issues of concern to women of different races, sexual orientations, ages, and so forth. (Same as WGSS 468.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or WGSS 201. LEC
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Review of current psychotherapies with special references to their underlying philosophies, theories of personality, techniques, and effectiveness. Issues concerning the use of drugs in the treatment of mental disorders are also reviewed. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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This course reviews recent evidence on the roles of dreaming and dreamless sleep. Psychological, developmental, personality, and social psychological aspects are considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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The neurobiology of higher mental processes such as perception, attention, learning, memory, thinking, and language, as studied by techniques such as recording from individual neurons, electrical brain stimulation, brain damage, and brain scans and measurements of regional cerebral blood flow in conscious people. Emphasis will be placed on in-class analysis of original research articles. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 370, 371, 380, or 381; or consent of instructor. LEC
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Investigation of a special research problem or directed reading in an area not covered in regular courses. No more than 3 hours of PSYC 480 may be counted toward the minimum hours required for the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Guided participation in ongoing research programs to augment quantitative skills through direct practicum experience. No more than 3 hours of PSYC 481 may be counted toward the Psychology minor or the Psychology, Developmental Psychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience major requirements. Prerequisite: PSYC 200 or PSYC 201 or PSYC 210 or PSYC 211 or consent of instructor. RSH
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Introduction to human sensory and perceptual capabilities. Topics include: sensory systems, perceptual development, and perceiving color, objects, space, movement, sound, speech, touch, smell, and taste as well as various perceptual illusions. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Students conduct psychology focused fieldwork in an organization related to their professional/career goals. Credit hours are determined on the basis of 120 clock hours for 3 credit hours, 80 clock hours for 2 credit hours, and 40 clock hours for 1 credit hour. An internship plan (contract) is developed by the student in conjunction with the student's academic adviser and signed off by the academic adviser and an authorized agent of the internship site. At the conclusion of the internship experience, the authorized agent of the internship site writes the academic adviser indicating that the student has met the goals of the internship plan and the hours required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Psychology major. FLD
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An advanced course in the theories and basic concepts of child development. Coverage includes: (a) analyses of the general logic, assumptions, and principles of the five major approaches: normative-maturation, psychoanalytic, social learning theory, cognitive-developmental, and behavior analysis; (b) historical background of developmental theory; (c) social-cultural influences on theory construction; and (d) some cross-cultural perspectives. Not open to students previously enrolled in HDFL 290. Prerequisite: PSYC 104, or HDFL 160, HDFL 161, HDFL 432, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of psychological aspects of selected social issues in contemporary American society. Race relations and the civil rights movement. Political extremism. Public opinion and social change. Social psychological approaches to a variety of social problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or 361, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course examines classic issues in psychology--free-will and determinism, nature and nurture, the mind-body problem, approaches to human action, cultural influences on psychological theories, the evolution of intellectual paradigms, and inductive and deductive approaches to social scientific research--from multiple perspectives within psychology and related social sciences. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or equivalent. LEC
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A second course in statistics with emphasis on applications. Analysis of variance, regression, analysis, analysis of contingency tables; possibly selected further topics. Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in PSYC 210 or PSYC 211. LEC
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An introduction to the field of human sexuality. Topics to be covered include sexual anatomy and physiology, fertilization, pregnancy, birth and lactation, contraception, human sexual response, sexuality across the life cycle, love, marriage, alternatives to marriage, sexual orientation, sex differences in behavior, parenthood, sexually transmitted diseases, sex and the law, and sex education. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Optional course for students currently enrolled in PSYC 510 or may be taken after completion of PSYC 510. Will offer students practical experience in an infant research laboratory. Students must spend a minimum of nine hours a week (on three different half days) in laboratory. They will learn to observe and record infant behavior, to handle data from experiments and participate in the planning and discussion of laboratory research. Acquaintance with and involvement in the issues of obtaining informed consent and ethical aspects of infant research will be included. Prerequisite: Current enrollment or previous enrollment in PSYC 510 and consent of instructor. LAB
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In-depth coverage of human memory phenomena, including phenomena concerning acquisition, storage and retrieval, unconscious forms of memory, memory monitoring and control, and practical aspects of memory such as autobiographical memory, mnemonic techniques and eyewitness memory. Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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A review of the literature on the development of memory in young children, and the implications of this research for understanding children's eyewitness testimony. The course will present current research on children's long-term memory abilities, the impact of stress on recall performance, the effectiveness of various types of interviewing techniques, and the suggestibility of children's recollections. Policy issues and potential guidelines for the elicitation and evaluation of children's memory reports in both clinical and legal arenas will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 or ABSC/HDFL 160, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of research on women and violence, including rape, domestic violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and child sexual abuse. The nature, prevalence, causes, and consequences of violence against women are discussed. (Same as WGSS 521.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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Introduction to the study of language development; emphasis on the psychological processes underlying syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of language development in children. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 333, or 334; or consent of instructor. LEC
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A review of the literature on contemporary psychological and developmental disorders of children and youth. Course will present current models of psychopathology, classification systems, assessment methods, and treatment approaches designed for the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention will be given to age, gender, and cultural differences and similarities. Topics include: anxiety disorders, oppositional behavior disorders, physical/sexual abuse, learning disabilities, and autism. (Same as ABSC 535.) Prerequisite: ABSC 160, PSYC 333, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of recent research on psycholinguistics covering the perception, production, and comprehension of language. Topics include: the biological basis for language, the nature of comprehension processes, and memory for the syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic components of language. Prerequisite: One of the following courses - PSYC 318, 319, 333, or 334; or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course considers the relationship between culture and psyche. One theme throughout the course involves revealing the cultural grounding of psychological functioning. The second and complementary theme involves identifying the psychological processes involved in the phenomenon of culture. Prerequisite: PSYC 333, 334, 360 or 361 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A review of evolutionary theory and its application to human personality, cognition, interpersonal relationships, family dynamics, and development. Prerequisite: PSYC 104 and at least 3 additional hours in Psychology, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An advanced study of the application of theories and concepts of developmental and behavioral psychology to a range of specific issues and problems of childhood and adolescence. This course will rely heavily upon the empirical research literature. Topics include contemporary social issues and child development, research in applied settings, assessment, intervention, and prevention, as well as program evaluation. (Same as ABSC 565.) Prerequisite: ABSC 160 or PSYC 333, and ABSC/PSYC 535. LEC
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An application of psychological processes and concepts to the American legal system. Among the topics covered are the socialization of legal attitudes, opinions about the purposes of the criminal justice system and especially of prisons, the concept of "dangerousness," the nature of jury decision making, and the rights of prisoners, patients, and children. LEC
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A study of the processes underlying the dynamics of the group, including the observation of group phenomena and a consideration of their relation to research findings. Prerequisite: PSYC 360 or 361, or consent of instructor. LEC
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