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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A study of selected contemporary problems of policy or politics affecting several countries. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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An evaluation of the formulation of United States foreign policy in the post-World War II period. Economic, military, and diplomatic dimensions of policy; internal and external influences on policy; theories of foreign policy decision-making. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170. LEC
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An examination of the gains possible from international cooperation and the barriers to achieving cooperation. Theoretical perspectives on international cooperation will be explored along with cases such as trade, the environment, arms control, and the European community. Prerequisite: POLS 170 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Structural theories of the international political economy provide the framework for a consideration of the nature of hegemony, the management problem of multinational corporations, the role of international regimes and organizations, development, and dependency. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170. LEC
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International organizations are examined with special emphasis devoted to the United Nations. A central theme of the course rests upon the question of whether strengthened international organization offers the only alternative to further world wars. Prerequisite: POLS 170 and three additional hours of political science. LEC
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This course reviews how philosophical perspectives elucidate the role ethics plays in foreign policy. It covers human rights doctrines, issues of economic and political justice, just war theory (jus ad bellum) and just conduct of war (jus en bello) and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POLS 170 or POLS 171. LEC
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Examination of the history of Soviet and Russian foreign policy and current issues of foreign policy in the Post-Soviet era. Analysis of foreign policy making in Russia and the other Post-Soviet states. Emphasis on the changed nature of international security problems after the cold war and on the role of foreign policy in economic development. Prerequisite: Eight hours in the social sciences or history, including either POLS 170 or a course in Russian history. LEC
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An intensive study of the problems of ideological conflict, diplomatic relations, strategic arrangements, economic cooperation, and cultural exchange in East and Southeast Asia with special emphasis upon the roles of major world powers. (Same as EALC 676.) Prerequisite: POLS 170 or a course in East Asian studies. LEC
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An investigation into (1) how security policy is made; (2) the evolution of changing assumptions, strategies and goals since 1945; and (3) the present policy and its alternatives. Prerequisite: Six hours of political science, including POLS 170. LEC
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In-depth examination of China's changing policies toward other countries with special emphasis on policy-making process, negotiating behavior, military strategy, economic relations, and cultural diplomacy. (Same as EALC 678.) Prerequisite: POLS 170 or a course in East Asian studies. LEC
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Examination of the historical and theoretical issues surrounding the sources and control of international conflict. Topics will include political and anthropological theories of conflict, the role of force in the international system, international law and just war approaches, nuclear conflict, arms control, and nonviolent alternatives to conflict. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170; POLS 306 is recommended. LEC
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A consideration of classical and modern theories of the international system, such as the writing of Thucydides, Machiavelli, twentieth-century realists, and others. Topics include, theories of the state, the role of ethics and normative judgments in the world order, the nature and use of power, the relationship between domestic and international politics. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of theories that seek to explain the foreign policy behavior and decision making processes of states in international relations and a survey of past and present foreign policies of several states in Latin America, Western and Eastern Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the Far East. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 150 and POLS 170. LEC
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This seminar examines the theories about, research on, and the practice of international mediation and other forms of non-militarized third party intervention used to address interstate, intrastate, and nonstate disputes. Specific topics include how mediation differs from other forms of non-militarized peace-building and conflict resolution; the conditions for mediation success (and how 'success' is defined; third party involvement after protracted civil conflict; the role of third parties in the implementation of peace agreements; the relationship between mediation, peace-building, and international law; and proactive conflict management. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170/171 and membership in the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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International law has assumed an increasingly significant role in international life. This course will examine major law including (but not limited to): the changing status and role of the state; rights of minorities and self-determination; the environment; and human rights. The course will examine the central questions and the relevant international legal principles associated with each issue. Prerequisite: Six hours of Political Science, including POLS 170. LEC
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This course examines the principles, roles, and functions of international law in the conduct of war. As the course reviews the development and application of the basic rules of armed conflict, several current issues and conflicts are addressed including: the legitimate use of force; the proper definitions of combatants and civilians; actions that constitute war crimes, the legality of new weapons technology, and, if the laws of armed conflict apply to the current "war on terrorism." Prerequisite: Six hours of Political Science, including POLS 170. LEC
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A study of selected problems in international relations. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 170. LEC
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This course is intended to introduce graduate and advanced undergraduate students to the kinds of activities engaged in by political theorists. Thus the course focuses on several approaches to doing political theory, such as interpreting the work of great political philosophers, clarifying political concepts, organizing and integrating political ideas, evaluating political practices, and creating new political perspectives. The course focuses on historical and contemporary treatments of both epistemological issues (the possibility and grounds for political knowledge) and selected substantive issues (e.g., the legitimacy of the state, the merits and limitations of democracy, the requirements of justice, and the nature and importance of ideologies). LEC
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A survey of the political economic approach to individual and collective choice behavior called "rational choice." The course focuses on models of voting systems and other political institutions as seen from a game theoretic perspective. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science or admission into the M.A. or Ph.D. LEC
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Introduction to the discipline of political science, the philosophy of science, research design, and data acquisition. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to quantitative research methods in political science, including probability theory and statistical analysis, as well as background material required for these methods. Computer applications for research and statistical analysis accompany these topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, POLS 705, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course covers basic techniques for multivariate analysis, focusing on multiple regression. Topics include interpretation of regression statistics, diagnostics for common problems, dummy variables, instrumental variables, basic time series methods including adjustment for autocorrelated error, logistic models, and nonlinear modeling; additional techniques may be covered at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: POLS 706. LEC
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An examination of qualitative research approaches frequently employed within political science. Topics may include the use of case studies, archival and documentary research, content analysis, interviewing and focus group techniques, ethnographic fieldwork, narrative and discourse analysis, and others. The course will examine the strengths and limitations of these methods in relation to major research traditions such as culturalist approaches, historical institutionalism, rational choice, and constructivism. Prerequisite: POLS 705 and either graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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At the discretion of the instructor, this course will select one or more important areas of political theory for in-depth analysis. Prerequisite: Six hours in Political Theory. LEC
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Surveys scholarly attempts to describe and analyze critically the changing public philosophies that have dominated American society and politics. Liberalism, republicanism, ascriptivism, and pluralism are examples of such public philosophies. Also considered are some philosophies that are important but have not dominated American politics. Transcendentalism, populism, communitarianism, racial nationalism, and religious fundamentalism are examples of such philosophies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. SEM
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Examination of the relations between psychological mechanisms and social milieu factors and individual political behavior. Particular attention is devoted to understanding the development of politically relevant psychological traits and dispositions, and to the methodology employed in studying the socio-psychological factors which underlie individual political behavior. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of political science and consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the characteristics of voting behavior and the influences upon such behavior in the United States. Emphasis is placed upon relevant research findings concerning partisanship and participation in politics, and on the methodology employed in the study of political behavior. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of political science and consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the province and function of law in the context of relevant social, economic, and political factors. The impact of these factors on the law will be illustrated through readings and discussions of selected case histories. Emphasis will be placed upon law as a social phenomenon rather than upon its technical aspects. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of political science and permission of instructor for undergraduates. LEC
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A seminar for students interested in understanding the public opinion, voting, and other forms of political participation. This course will include a discussion of the formation, measurement of political attitudes as well as an examination of protest and other forms of extra-legal participation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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A seminar to be offered as occasion demands, dealing with, but not limited to special topics in the presidency, congress, and judicial processes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Introductory graduate course in the examination of public policy making. Considers institutions, basic theoretical frameworks, and standard methods, and places policy-making within a broad political context. Emphasizes American examples, but relevant comparative material is employed. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of political science. LEC
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A survey of characteristic legal, political, and administrative relationships among different units of American government, with particular emphasis upon the role of state agencies. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science. LEC
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This seminar examines the application of policy theory in regional and comparative contexts. Much of the research examined focuses on comparative public policy, but select weeks focus on specific regions of the world. A key goal is to help students understand which theories of policy may be best suited for universal application. LEC
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The collapse of the Soviet system and the problems of transforming a central planned authoritarian state into a free market democracy. The roles of ethnic and national tensions, economic decay, and cultural factors. Prerequisite: Eight hours in the social sciences and/or history, including POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Primarily a comparative analysis of the Mexican, Bolivian, and Cuban revolutions within a framework of theories of revolutions. Some attention also to revolutionary political groupings and conditions in other Latin American countries. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course concerning Latin America in the social sciences or history. LEC
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Study of topics in international law, relating these closely to the dynamics of international relations. Special emphasis will be given to regulating force, resolving disputes, the law of the sea, human rights, and emerging problem areas such as the environment, outer space, the oceanic seabed, and genocide. Prerequisite: Six hours of courses in international relations including POLS 170 and/or relevant courses in the social sciences and modern history. LEC
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A study of selected problems in international relations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A survey and critical examination of recent theoretical developments and research focusing on national institutions, electoral behavior, and policy-making processes. Emphasis is given to conceptualizing and analyzing the changing nature of the American political system. LEC
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A critical examination of the principal areas in current literature in political psychology, including psychological perspectives on mass political behavior, elite decision making, and international relations. Attention will be given to articulating and evaluating theories, constructing research questions and programs, and comparing methodologies. LEC
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Survey of the literature on the institutional, socioeconomic, and political forces influencing the formulation and adoption of public policy, as well as policy change, at all levels of government. Topics include problem definition, agenda setting, and the methods of decision-making. This is a research seminar so students will be required to conduct an original research project. LEC
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An overview of the policy implementation process and the analysis of public policy. The course covers a variety of theories and methods related to the study of the implementation process, policy evaluation, policy analysis, and policy change and learning. Substantive policy areas covered include environmental regulation, education, criminal justice, public safety, and health care. LEC
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An exploration of the ways in which public policy is made in the United States, focusing on the role of the administrator at each stage of the policy process: formulation, implementation, and evaluation. Various theories of policy-making and their applications to specific areas of public policy will be examined. LEC
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An examination of policy development, implementation, and evaluation in the local government context. Various theories of the policy process and their application to municipal government are examined. (Same as PUAD 825.) LEC
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Research seminar organized around advanced quantitative and qualitative method skills for research on American and comparative politics and public policy. The course will combine advanced statistical estimation procedures (e.g., hazard analysis, event history analysis, hierarchical "contextual effects" models) with methods for the collection and integration of data. This course is intended to facilitate research efforts of students in the fields of American politics, comparative politics, and public policy. The course is open to Ph.D. students from other departments who have completed a course in intermediate regression analysis. Prerequisite: POLS 707 or similar graduate level course. LEC
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This course provides an overview of the role of law, litigation, and courts in the public policy process, with an emphasis on bureaucratic institutions. The course covers the main theories and empirical research on the policy effects of litigation and intervention, with a particular focus on civil rights in the areas of employment, policing, welfare, prisons, and environmental policy. (Same as PUAD 849.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a graduate level introduction to the field of Comparative Politics. Among topics it will survey are: the history and development of the field; classic works and major founding concerns of the field; methodological and epistemological debates; competing paradigms which had characterized Comparative Politics (structural-functionalism, culturalists, state-centrists, institutionalists, rational choice, and other); theory building and the role of area studies. LEC
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This course provides a survey of the subfield of political institutions within Comparative Politics. Among the topics it will cover are: identifying regime types (democracy vs. non-democracy); comparative electoral systems; party systems; presidential vs. parliamentary systems; comparative legislatures; constitutional engineering and democratic transitions, and others. Prerequisite: POLS 850. LEC
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This course provides a survey of some of the major works, research traditions, and current debates in the subfield of comparative political economy. This includes such topics as: The political economy of development and underdevelopment; dependency and world systems theory; the relationship between economic development and democracy; capitalist development and democracy; the political economy of dual transitions; the political economy of privatization and structural adjustment; comparative welfare states; and comparative labor-business-government relations. Prerequisite: POLS 850. LEC
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This course provides a survey of some major research traditions and current debates in the subfield of political sociology. This includes such topic as: culture and politics; elites, social structures, and politics; the politics of cultural pluralism and ethnonationalism; social movements and protest; gender and politics; state-society relation; and religion and politics. Prerequisite: POLS 850. LEC
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Critical evaluation of the major approaches to international relations and their application to conflict and conflict resolution, foreign policy, and international political economy. LEC
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An introduction to fieldwork and surveys conducted in developing and non-democratic countries. The course covers the challenges of conducting interviews and surveys in these countries. The intent is to develop the research skills necessary for data collection and fieldwork as well as evaluating an analyzing survey data collected by other researchers in developing countries. Prerequisite: POLS 705 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. SEM
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This course will review and analyze the current literature on China's social and political development, including a wide range of topics within political science. There is a rich body of literature within each topic such as civil society in China, legal reform, political culture, nationalism, gender issues, ethnicity, political behavior, elections, economic development, and inequality. This course will introduce key literature within each topic focusing on the debates among China scholars as well as how these debates fit in the general field of political science. (Same as EALC 888 and POLS 888.) Prerequisite: POLS 668 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Research course used to fulfill continuous enrollment requirement for master's degree students. Hours cannot count toward degree. Must be graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. RSH
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Enrollment for writing thesis for master's degrees. THE
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This seminar addresses the rapidly growing science of complex systems. Topics addressed include political, economic, ecological, and biological systems. Includes a survey of the theory of complexity and computer models that are used to study complex adaptive systems. The main focus is on agent-based models, but attention is also given to traditional cellular automata. Methods of designing, programming, and interpreting results of agent-based models are addressed. Students who have no formal training in computer programming are welcome in the course, but they should expect to do some extra work on fundamentals of programming. A preparatory course in Java, C++, Objective-C, or another object-oriented language would significantly facilitate the student's research effort. SEM
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Covers topics appropriate for a second course in regression analysis. The content will vary according to the interest of the instructor and students, but will generally include such topics as multiple imputation of missing data, the generalized linear model (GLM), and specialized models for longitudinal data. The course will include a review of the principles of maximum likelihood estimation and applications of matrix algebra and differential calculus in statistical applications. LEC
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This course focuses on quantitative methods of research relevant to international relations and comparative politics. Topics will vary with the instructor and student interests, but may include time series analysis, classification algorithms, computer programming and computational modeling, simulation, event data and content analysis, and dynamic models. Prerequisite: POLS 707. LEC
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This course surveys rational choice theories of politics as they are applied to decisions by individuals and groups. Models of individual behavior are drawn primarily from economics and decision theory. The primary approaches to collective choice are social choice theory and game theory. Prerequisite: POLS 707. LEC
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An intensive seminar in a method (or a variety of relevant methods) of theoretical or empirical research designed for Ph.D. students only. Emphasis is on deepening the understanding and ability to use advanced methods of analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program. RSH
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A faculty and advanced graduate student collegial research experience focusing on American politics, policy-making and administration, with faculty and students engaged in the production of scholarly research articles, books and conference papers. Topics will be chosen by individual students with consent of the seminar professor. LEC
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This seminar employs various theoretical and methodological perspectives to explore the burgeoning post-1960 literature on Congress. Traditional subjects such as committees, parties, and elections are examined through applications of formal models, behavioral analyses, and participant observation. LEC
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A research seminar for students interested in theoretical and empirical approaches to the behavior of candidates, voters and contributors in campaigns and elections. The impact of campaign laws and other institutional influences will also be examined. LEC
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Research seminar on various aspects of state and local government, such as reformed institutions, fiscal stress, citizen participation, and various policy problems. LEC
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Survey of various approaches to the analysis of political behavior, including an evaluation of each approach in terms of its utility in building empirically-based political theory. Examples of the application of the various approaches will focus upon the American political process. LEC
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A survey of the theories and research findings dealing with political parties in American politics, including third and minor parties. Topics to be covered include the development and evolution of the party system, the nature of party organization and the recruitment of party activists, the role of parties in the electoral process, the impact of parties upon public policy, and party reform. LEC
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The focus of this course is upon the theories and research findings dealing with political groups in American politics, including protest groups, movements, as well as conventional interest groups. Topics to be covered include group mobilization and maintenance, group involvement in the political party and electoral processes, methods and strengths of group influence, and the impact of political groups on the policy process. LEC
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An advanced research seminar for students interested in theoretical and empirical approaches to the American presidency. This seminar will examine the powers and organizations of the White House through a study of the literature. LEC
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A seminar to be offered as occasion demands, dealing with, but not limited to, bureaucracy, legislative policy, federalism, and special problems in U.S. politics. LEC
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Research seminar designed to apply public policy theory and policy analysis methods to evaluate the impact of public policies. Students will be required to design and conduct an original research project with the intention of presenting the work at a professional conference or publishing the work in a professional journal. LEC
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This seminar is designed to initiate the advanced graduate student to research in judicial and jury behavior. Requirements include mastery of literature on the psychological foundations of legal judgment and research designed to test propositions derived from this literature. LEC
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Study of selected topics in public policy. LEC
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A discussion of teaching methods and approaches. Students are expected to develop a personal teaching portfolio that describes their outlook on teaching political science and provides sample teaching materials. This course must be taken by all graduate teaching assistants and assistant instructors during the first year of their appointment. Grades are issued on a pass/fail basis. LEC
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A faculty and advanced graduate student collegial research experience, focusing on comparative politics, area studies, and international relations, with faculty and students engaged in the production of scholarly research articles, books, and conference papers. Topics will be chosen by individual students with consent of the seminar professor. RSH
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A study of how politicians, interest group leaders, and dissident leaders exhort citizens to act in or preclude them from acting in politics. LEC
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This research seminar addresses the major theoretical and empirical issues in the study of electoral and party systems. In addition to evaluating the classic works of Arrow, Duverger, Lipset and Rokkan, Rae, and Taagepera and Shugart, students will assess contemporary work on electoral and party systems that has evolved from this source material. The course will address the design and reform of electoral systems, institutional rules and the strategic environment they create for political actors, the role of institutional and social factors in the development of political party systems, and the role of election administration. Students will develop and present original research papers related to these topics. Prerequisite: POLS 850. LEC
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This research seminar addresses the major theoretical and empirical issues in the study of legislatures. Students will discuss the design of institutions, government formation, accountability, legislative process and role of committees, agenda setting, elections and parties, and representation. The course will familiarize students with the core debates in legislative studies, extend knowledge of regional variation in the design and function of representative institutions, develop skills in the analysis of legislative records, and enhance professional socialization. Prerequisite: POLS 810, POLS 850, or consent of instructor. SEM
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In-depth study of the politics of Russia, Ukraine, and the other Post-Soviet states. Focus on the problems of transforming a centrally planned authoritarian system to a free market democracy. LEC
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Theory and research on the patterns of behavior that characterize the politics of North America, Europe, and developed regions of Asia. Topics include corporatism and alternative forms of interest intermediation, economic theories of socialization and electoral choice, and the role of the state; its finances, adaptation, and the problem of power and legitimacy. Prerequisite: POLS 850 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A research seminar on selected subjects and issues in the governments and politics of selected Asian countries. The particular focus each year will depend upon the instructor. LEC
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An in-depth discussion of the representation and processing of language from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. This course involves critical discussion of selected topics of current research interest in neurolinguistics. The course also includes a significant hands-on component, in which students receive training in research on the cognitive neuroscience of language by developing and implementing a new EEG study on an aspect of language, as well by completing as a series of mini-labs introducing neuroimaging methods and analyses. Prerequisite: LING 738 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Study of selective topics in comparative government and politics. LEC
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This is an advanced graduate seminar on the comparative study of politics in countries characterized by sub-cultural cleavages, including ethnicity, language, religion and race. The course will first survey and critique competing theoretical explanations for different patterns of conflict or peaceful cohabitation among such groups in a variety of world regions. Students will then examine the utility of these theories in individual in-depth research papers which will be presented in class and critiqued by seminar participants. LEC
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Designed to acquaint students with the principal theories, approaches and types of empirical analysis generally employed to explain and interpret the creation and implementation of foreign policy. Topics include rational actor models, collective and bureaucratic processes, societal influences, cognitive and psychological factors, and comparative foreign policy. Prerequisite: POLS 870. An undergraduate United States foreign policy class is recommended. LEC
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An in-depth survey of theories and research on international conflict. Topics will range from anthropological studies of conflict in primitive societies to contemporary theories of nuclear conflict. The course will also cover current empirical research methodology and results of research on international conflict, as well as models of conflict processes. Prerequisite: POLS 870. LEC
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Provides an eclectic survey of major developments in the field. Topics include the intellectual origins of IPE; the historical evolution of the international system; North-South and Western trade, investment, and monetary relations; foreign aid, debt technology transfer, development, international economic institutions (e.g., IMF, IBRD, MNCs, etc.). (Same as SOC 873.) Prerequisite: POLS 870 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course examines the theory and practice of international mediation and other forms of third party intervention used to resolve interstate and nonstate disputes. Topics include explanations of mediation success and failure, conditions of conflict escalation where mediation is likely to be counterproductive or resisted by recalcitrant disputants, the ethics of intervention, citizen diplomacy, and the role of international organizations such as the United Nations. Prerequisite: POLS 870. LEC
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This course examines how issues of International Ethics have been treated in International Relations theory. This course begins by reviewing several theoretical perspectives of International Relations and how these perspectives have historically understood the role ethics plays in international politics. By the end of the semester, students should have a firm understanding of (1) the salient issues of international ethics in world politics and (2) whether and how IR scholars have (theoretically and methodologically) placed those issues in their research paradigms. The issue areas the course will cover include, but are not limited to, human rights doctrines, issues of economic and political justice, just war theory (jus ad bellum) and just conduct of war (jus en bello), and humanitarian intervention. The course will assess the role international law has played in stemming and/or punishing human rights abuses. Students will review several historical cases of genocide, as well as several cases of truth and reconciliation commissions. LEC
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Intensive examination of key theoretical debates in international relations. Topics covered will include Classical Realism and Liberalism, Neorealist/Neoliberal debate, and post-structural critiques of mainstream international relations theory. Prerequisite: POLS 870. LEC
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To be offered periodically when topics of special interest arise. LEC
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Considers theoretical and empirical work on international governmental and non-governmental organizations (IOs). Specifically highlights the evolving scholarly debates regarding the function, design, and delegation of authority to IOs as well as their behavior and change. Explores these questions in depth through a wide range of cases, including comprehensive coverage of the United Nations, Bretton Woods Institutions, and the European Union, and their activities in issue areas concerning international security, trade, finance, development, humanitarian aid, and the environment. LEC
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Considers the nature and problems of development and underdevelopment from a cross-regional and interdisciplinary perspective. Deals with the historical origins of the enormous disparities in wealth that exist today, both between and within countries. Considers the explanations for those differences, prescriptions for how to narrow them, and specific cases (both successes and failures) from various regions of the globe. LEC
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Designed to meet the needs of graduate students whose study in political science cannot be met with present course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Designed for advanced graduate students who are concurrently enrolled or who will be enrolled in a subsequent semester in one of the Research Seminars in American Government or International Studies. Students enrolling in this course should have the prior approval of the faculty member with whom they wish to conduct the research. RSH
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An independent reading course for students preparing to take the Ph.D. comprehensive examination. May be taken for two semesters or six credits, whichever comes first. Graded on A, B, C, D, or F depending on the results of the comprehensive examination. RSH
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Enrollment for writing doctoral dissertations. THE
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Five hours of class per week, plus supplementary work in language laboratory. Essentials of grammar, elementary syntax and composition, easy reading. Emphasis on conversation. LEC
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Three meetings weekly, plus supplementary work in language laboratory. Designed for students proficient in Spanish (or with previous work in Portuguese) to acquire proficiency in Portuguese more rapidly. Covers the same material as PORT 104. Prerequisite: SPAN 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Five hours of class per week plus supplementary work in language laboratory. A continuation of PORT 104. Prerequisite: PORT 104. LEC
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A continuation of PORT 106. Prerequisite: PORT 106. LEC
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