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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A course designed to provide knowledge and skills to effect efficient and effective pharmacy management. This will include foundations in financial management, inventory control, purchasing, cost-effective drug utilization, quality management, pharmacoeconomics, and human resource management. LEC
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This introductory course in nuclear pharmacy practice provides a basic understanding of radiation, radiation dosimetry, radiopharmaceuticals, and clinical application of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnosis and treatment. The course includes both didactic material as well as laboratory experience. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services with a focus on the U.S. health care system. Course content addresses the following questions: how do we evaluate the health care sector, where is health care provided, how is health care financed, what are the characteristics of health care providers (individuals and institutions), what influences the performance of the health care sector, and what lies in the future for health care delivery. The purpose of the course is to prepare pharmacy students for non-clinical aspects of their practice sites. Enrollment limited to pharmacy majors. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of law and ethics as they apply to the practice of pharmacy. Course sessions will focus on ethical expectations of the profession, principles and issues in medical and pharmacy ethics, and laws that govern medication dispensing. LEC
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A course developed to increase students' knowledge and understanding of laws that regulate the pharmacy profession. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. LEC
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This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of drug information retrieval skills and medical literature evaluation skills with an application to pharmacy practice. This course is only open to distance education students. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm. D. program. LEC
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This course focuses on the pharmacotherapy and the role of the pharmacist in disease state management of diseases and conditions including Hormone Replacement, Osteoporosis, Rheumatoid and Osteoarthritis, Lipid disorders, and Diabetes. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmaceutical care plans. Appropriate pharmaceutical care plans will include rationale for drug use, appropriate drug selection and dosing regimens, expected outcomes of drug therapy, key monitoring parameters for efficacy and toxicity, clinically important drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, counseling, and compliance issues. The class format will include online assignments, interactive Internet-based lectures, and case studies. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm. D. program. LEC
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This course focuses on the pharmacotherapy and the role of the pharmacist in disease state management of diseases and conditions including Cancer and Infectious Diseases. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmaceutical care plans. Appropriate pharmaceutical care plans will include rationale for drug use, appropriate drug selection and dosing regimens, expected outcomes of drug therapy, key monitoring parameters for efficacy and toxicity, clinically important drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, counseling, and compliance issues. The class format will include online reading assignments, online study guides, online assignments, interactive Internet-based lectures and case studies. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm. D. program. LEC
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This course focuses on the pharmacotherapy and the role of the pharmacist in disease state management of Hypertension, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarct, Heart Failure, Stroke, Anticoagulation, Upper GI Disorders, Asthma and COPD, and Renal Disease. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans. These plans will include rationale for drug use, selection and dosing regimens, expected outcomes of drug therapy, key monitoring parameters, clinically important drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, counseling, and compliance issues. The class format includes online reading assignments, study guides, and assignments, interactive Internet-based lectures and case studies. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm. D. program. LEC
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This course focuses on the pharmacotherapy and the role of the pharmacist in disease state management of Variations in Drug Metabolism and Interactions, Hepatitis, Anti-retroviral Therapy, Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Bone and Joint Infections, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Seizure Disorders, and Depression. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, and therapeutics to devise appropriate pharmacy care plans. These plans will include rationale for drug use, selection and dosing regimens, expected outcomes of drug therapy, key monitoring parameters, clinically important drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, counseling, and compliance issues. The class format includes online reading assignments, study guides, and assignments, interactive Internet-based lectures and case studies. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm.D. program. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of drug information analysis, storage, and retrieval as well as biostatistics as applied to understanding and interpreting biomedical literature. Advantages and disadvantages of several commercial and manual drug information systems will be considered. The course includes practical experiences in drug information services. The biostatistical emphasis of the course will be on the application of statistical tests commonly used and the interpretation of their results. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. LEC
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A course designed for the study of special topics in pharmacy practice. A research paper will be required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Students interview and assess patients, review laboratory data, and develop health problem lists and prospective pharmaceutical care plans in an approved NTPD site. Students must select and have approved, 8 weeks in advance, a site that provides daily access to patients for 3 consecutive days. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the NTPD program and completion of the didactic portion of the NTPD program. FLD
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Students interview and assess patients, review laboratory data, and develop health care problem lists and prospective pharmaceutical care plans in an approved NTPD site. Students must select and have sites approved 8 weeks in advance of the clerkship. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the NTPD program and completion of the didactic portion of the NTPD program. FLD
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Students interview and assess patients, review laboratory data, and develop health problem lists and prospective pharmaceutical care plans in an approved NTPD site. Students must select and have sites approved 8 weeks in advance of the clerkship. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the NTPD program and completion of the didactic portion of the NTPD program. FLD
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Students interview and assess patients, review laboratory data, and develop health problem lists and prospective pharmaceutical care plans in an approved NTPD site. Students must select and have sites approved 8 weeks in advance of the clerkship. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the NTPD program and completion of the didactic portion of the NTPD program. FLD
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Students interview and assess patients, review laboratory data, and develop health problem lists and prospective pharmaceutical care plans in an approved NTPD site. Students must select and have sites approved 8 weeks in advance of the clerkship. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the NTPD program and completion of the didactic portion of the NTPD program. FLD
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A course dealing with the clinical applications of drug knowledge to patient care. Disease and drug knowledge will be applied to the design and monitoring of therapeutic treatment plans for patients. Incorporates three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of case studies and off-campus professional experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pharmacy Practice II (PHAR 502). LEC
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A course dealing with the clinical applications of drug knowledge to patient care. Disease and drug knowledge will be applied to the design and monitoring of therapeutic treatment plans for patients. Incorporates three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of case studies and off-campus professional experience. This course is graded A,B,C,F. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing and successful completion of Pharmacotherapy I, PHPR 646. LEC
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A course dealing with the clinical applications of drug knowledge to patient care. Disease and drug knowledge will be applied to the design and monitoring of therapeutic treatment plans for patients. Incorporates three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of case studies and off-campus professional experience. This course is graded A,B,C,F. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing and successful completion of Pharmacotherapy II, PHPR 647 with a C or above. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of drug information analysis, storage, and retrieval. Advantages and disadvantages of several commercial and manual systems will be considered. The course includes practical experiences in drug information services. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of statistics as they apply to the understanding and interpretation of the biomedical literature. The emphasis of this course is on the application of statistical tests commonly employed in biomedical research and the interpretation of their results. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. LEC
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An introduction to the principles of physical assessment used to monitor drug effectiveness, side effects, adverse drug reactions, and drug-related complications. Prerequisite: Fifth year standing. LEC
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This course provides the student the opportunity to develop and present a formal seminar on a drug therapy management subject using appropriate audiovisual aids and to defend their presentation of material. LEC
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A course designed to give the graduate student a practical experience in areas of professional communications such as administrative proposals, grants, letters, memos, poster presentations, and written papers. The course focuses on the different kinds of communications required to relate to other health care professionals. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Pharmacoepidemiology is the application of the principles of epidemiology to the study of medications and their effects on health. Evaluating a drug's effects commences when a chemical entity becomes a drug candidate, intensifies through clinical trials, and continues after products reach the market. These studies are critical for supporting the proper use of medications in terms of efficacy, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. This course provides a broad introduction to the principles of pharmacoepidemiology with a focus on applications in the medical literature. LEC
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The course will provide students with an overview and appraisal of the "state-of-the-art" in the evaluation of health care programs and services (with a special emphasis on pharmaceutical programs, services, and products). The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the tools to conduct economic rather than general evaluation of health care programs and services. There will be some discussion of theoretical concepts, but the major emphasis will be on practical methodological issues in economic evaluation of pharmaceutical programs. The course integrates the perspectives of pharmaceutical and health care technology assessment, managed care, outcomes research, and public health. The main topics covered in the course include: cost, cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness, cost-utility, and cost-benefit analyses. LEC
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Research reports, reviews, and/or presentations on the current status of various aspects of pharmacy practice. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A course dealing with the planning, justification, implementation, management, and coordination of a progressive, comprehensive institutional pharmacy service. Seminar presentations and case studies are used to analyze recent advances and to apply data from the research literature. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of PHPR 865 dealing with the current status of health care delivery systems and the impact of changes in this area on pharmacy practice. Prerequisite: PHPR 865 and consent of instructor. LEC
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A course dealing with recruitment, training, motivation, monitoring of performance, and disciplining of personnel. Seminars, case studies, and role playing are used to apply the information to specific human resource management situations in institutional pharmacy practice. Prerequisite: PHPR 865 and consent of instructor. LEC
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Original investigation in the area of pharmacy practice. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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The new student will be introduced to the faculty research programs. Each faculty member will present his/her research interests using one or more of the following formats: laboratory demonstrations, computer simulations and lectures. The objectives are to assist the new student in selecting his/her area of dissertation research and acquainting the new student with the department research resources. LEC
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All aspects of reproductive physiology including an in depth study of ovarian and testicular development/function, neuroendocrine development/function, implantation, placentation, puberty, pregnancy and fertility regulation are covered. Historical and current scientific literature will be used to support a graduate level text and didactic lectures. Prerequisite: a general endocrinology/physiology course, an equivalent course and/or consent of instructor. LEC
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Special studies designed and arranged on an individual basis to allow a student to pursue a particular subject through reading, special laboratory work, and conferences with a senior staff member. LEC
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This course will focus on principles that underlie genetic analysis, including mutation, complementation, recombination, segregation, and regulation. The genetics of commonly used model organisms such as yeast, flies, worms and mice will be examined, classic genetic screens performed to study phage assembly, cell cycle regulation, sex determination and X-chromosome inactivation will be discussed and modern-day techniques used to study inheritance and gene function in various systems will be analyzed. Human genetic analysis will also be covered, including population genetics, techniques for gene mapping, inherited diseases, genetic testing and gene therapy. Through reading and discussion of scientific literature and problem-based homework and exams, students will learn how to evaluate and interpret genetic data as well as develop and design genetic strategies to solve current biological problems. Prerequisite: Completion of IGPBS Core Curriculum or equivalent, or permission of Course Director. LEC
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Advanced course on modern human physiology. The course focuses on organ systems of the human body including nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, reproductive and urinary systems. This course emphasizes the use of modern experimental approaches that take advantage of cellular and molecular technologies. Prerequisite: NONE LEC
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Somatosensory, motor and cognitive function of the brain will be discussed using a combination of lecture and student presentation formats. Current issues and evidence underlying accepted concepts and mechanisms will be emphasized. (Same as NURO 844. ) Prerequisite: Introductory course in neuroscience and consent of instructor. LEC
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Team taught, in-depth neuroscience course focusing on normal and diseased brain function at the molecular, cellular and systems levels. Lectures and discussions will emphasize current issues in neuroscience research. (Same as ANAT 846, PHCL 846 and NURO 846). Prerequisite: Permission of course director. LEC
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Development of the nervous system from early induction to the development of learning and memory. Topics include: Induction; Cellular Differentiation; Axon Growth and Guidance; Target Selection; Cell Survival and Growth; Synapse Formation; Synapse Elimination; and Development of Behavior. (Same as ANAT 847 and NURO 847.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846; NURO 846; PHSL 846) or consent of instructor. LEC
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An in-depth coverage of pathogenic mechanisms in neurological diseases: cellular and molecular responses to brain injury and disease, neuroinflammatory diseases (e.g., multiple sclerosis), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases), neurogenetic diseases (e.g., lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders, Down's syndrome and fragile X), trauma, stroke, and viral diseases (e.g., HIV encephalitis). (Same as ANAT 848, NURO 848, and PHCL 848.) Prerequisite: Advanced Neuroscience (ANAT 846, PHCL 846 or PHSL 846) or an equivalent course and consent of instructor. LEC
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Original laboratory investigation conducted under the supervision of a senior staff member. RSH
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Student participation (attendance and presentation) in weekly Departmental seminar series. The topics examined in these seminars are dictated by the interests of students and staff. Prerequisite: student must have passed their oral comprehensive exam. LEC
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Preparation of the formal thesis based on library research or independent research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master's degree. Credits will be given only after the thesis has been accepted by the student's thesis committee. THE
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Preparation of the Dissertation based on original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Credits will be given only after the dissertation has been accepted by the student's dissertation committee. THE
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A one-semester survey of classical and modern physics, designed primarily for liberal arts students. Typical subjects include the laws of motion, gravity, electricity and magnetism, sound, light, quantum mechanics, atomic and subatomic physics. Subjects are treated mainly conceptually with some use of basic data. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 104. LEC
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A discussion of important concepts in physics. While basic concepts such as force, energy, and mass will be introduced as needed, the emphasis will be on an understanding and appreciation of contemporary science. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 104 and participation in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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Principles and applications of mechanics, fluids, heat, thermodynamics, and sound waves. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. This course emphasizes the development of quantitative concepts and problem solving skills for students needing a broad background in physics as part of their preparation in other major programs, and for those who wish to meet the laboratory science requirement of the College. In special circumstances, permission to enroll in less than four hours may be obtained from the department. Not open to students with credit in PHSX 211 or PHSX 212. Prerequisite: MATH 104, or three and one-half years of college-preparatory mathematics including trigonometry and a score of 25 or higher on ACT mathematics. LEC
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A continuation of PHSX 114. Principles and applications of electricity, magnetism, light, atomic physics, and nuclear physics. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. In special circumstances, permission to enroll in less than four hours may be obtained from the department. Not open to students with credit in PHSX 212. Prerequisite: PHSX 114. LEC
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A laboratory exploring classical and modern physics, designed primarily for liberal arts students. Experiments in motion gravity, electricity and magnetism, sound, light, atomic and subatomic physics are designed to teach physics concepts and basic laboratory techniques. One two-hour lab period per week. Counts as a laboratory science when preceded or accompanied by PHSX 111. Prerequisite: Eligibility for MATH 104. Corequisite: PHSX 111. LAB
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This course is intended for all students in physics, astronomy and engineering physics. Course content includes topics of current interest in all fields of physics and astronomy. LEC
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Classical mechanics and thermodynamics with calculus for students who have had a prior algebra-based course. Prerequisite: PHSX 114, either MATH 116 or 121, and permission of the department. LEC
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Introduction to classical mechanics and thermodynamics. Designed for students in engineering and physical science majors. In special circumstances, permission to enroll for fewer than four hours credit may be obtained from the department. Students with credit in PHSX 114 can obtain only one hour of credit. Prerequisite: MATH 116 or MATH 121; courses in high school physics and/or chemistry are recommended. LEC
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Study of electricity and magnetism, waves and sound. In special circumstances, permission to enroll for fewer than four hours credit may be obtained from the department. Students with credit in PHSX 115 can obtain only one hour of credit. Prerequisite: PHSX 211. Corequisite: MATH 122. LEC
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An honors section of PHSX 211. Credit for fewer than four hours requires permission of the department. Recommended for students with a strong math background who are either in the University Honors Program or intending to major in a physical science. Courses in high school physics and chemistry are strongly recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 121 and permission of instructor. LEC
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An honors section of PHSX 212. Credit for fewer than four hours requires permission of the department. Recommended for students with a strong math background who are either in the University Honors Program or intending to major in a physical science. Prerequisite: PHSX 211 or PHSX 213, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: MATH 122. LEC
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Introduction to modern physics. Topics include special relativity, optics, and introductions to quantum mechanics and solid state physics. Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214 or EECS 220. Corequisite: MATH 320 or MATH 220. LEC
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Experiments in optics and modern physics. Development of experimental skills, data reduction, error analysis, and technical writing. One lab meeting per week and one lecture per week on topics including error analysis and experimental design. Pre-or corequisite: PHSX 313. LAB
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Work in some area of physics beyond the topics or material covered in other courses. For some problems, continued enrollment in consecutive semesters may be appropriate. Prerequisite: One junior-senior course in science in an area related to the problem and consent of instructor. IND
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This course is to enable students seeking departmental Honors in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. At the completion of the required 4 hours of total enrollment, a written and oral report of the research is required. (Same as EPHX 501.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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One meeting per week to plan and report progress on projects which may include tutoring of students in personalized modes of study; developing, administering, and scoring test items; designing and improving demonstration and laboratory experiments. Amount of credit depends on projects contracted for and completed. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: Evidence of prior academic experience relevant to the student's proposed activities in the seminar and permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their advisor. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as ASTR 503 and EPHX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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An introduction to quantum mechanics, emphasizing a physical overview. Topics should include the formalisms of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the 3-dimensional Schrodinger equation with applications to the hydrogen atom; spin and angular momentum; multi-particle systems of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein particles; time-independent perturbation theory. (Same as EPHX 511.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 290. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing experimental techniques and data analysis, as well as scientific writing and presentation skills. Experiments will explore a range of classical and modern physics topics. (Same as EPHX 516.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, PHSX 316 and PHSX 521. (PHSX 521 may be taken concurrently.) LAB
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Applications of modern mathematical methods to problems in mechanics and modern physics. Techniques include application of partial differential equations and complex variables to classical field problems in continuous mechanics, unstable and chaotic systems, electrodynamics, hydrodynamics, and heat flow. Applications of elementary transformation theory and group theory, probability and statistics, and nonlinear analysis to selected problems in modern physics as well as to graphical representation of experimental data. Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320 or permission of instructor. (Same as EPHX 518.) LEC
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Newton's laws of motion. Motions of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions. Motion of a system of particles. Moving coordinate systems. (Same as EPHX 521.) Prerequisite: PHSX 211 or PHSX 213, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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Study of physical processes in the solid Earth and of geophysical approaches to studying Earth systems at regional and global scales. Topics include global potential fields, thermal regime, rheology and Earth deformation, earthquakes and seismic structure, plate motions and global tectonics. (Same as GEOL 573) Prerequisite: An introductory course in geology, MATH 116 or MATH 122, and PHSX 115 or PHSX 212 or PHSX 214. LEC
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The properties of electric and magnetic fields, including electrostatics, Gauss' Law, boundary value methods, electric fields in matter, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields in matter, the properties of electric and magnetic dipoles, and of dielectric and magnetic materials. (Same as EPHX 531.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, PHSX 521 or special permission, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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A laboratory course that explores the theory and experimental techniques of analog and digital electronic circuit design and measurements. Topics include transient response, transmission lines, transistors, operational amplifiers, and digital logic. (Same as EPHX 536.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223 and MATH 290. PHSX 313 and 316 recommended. LAB
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This course covers the principles and applications of classical mechanics, fluids, heat, thermodynamics and sound. Teaching of these topics is strongly emphasized. Some laboratory work is included. This course is intended for students accepted to the BS Education major in Physics. This course does not count towards Physics or Astronomy major requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: Math 115 and 116, and either PHSX 114 or PHSX 211. LEC
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This course covers the principles and applications of electricity, magnetism and optics. Teaching of these topics is strongly emphasized. Some laboratory work is included. This course is intended for students accepted to the BS Education major in physics. This course does not count towards Physics or Astronomy major requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 115 and 116, and either PHSX 115 or PHSX 212. LEC
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This course covers the principles and applications of quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics. Teaching of these topics is strongly emphasized. Some laboratory work is included. This course is intended for students accepted to the BS Education major in physics. This course does not count towards Physics or Astronomy major requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 115 and 116, and either PHSX 115 or PHSX 313. LEC
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A survey of modern physical cosmology, its recent historical roots, and creation myths from many world cultures. An examination of the effects of these stories on their parent cultures. LEC
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Different topics will be covered as needed. This course will address topics in physics and astrophysics not covered in regularly offered courses. May be repeated if topic differs. (Same as EPHX 600.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing the application of physical principles to the design of systems for research, monitoring, or control. Topics include the use of microcomputers as controllers, interfacing microcomputers with measurement devices, and use of approximations and/or computer simulation to optimize design parameters, linear control systems, and noise. (Same as EPHX 601.) Prerequisite: Twelve hours of junior-senior credit in physics or engineering, including one laboratory course. LAB
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An introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of problems in physics for which simplifications allowing closed-form solutions are not applicable. Examples are drawn from mechanics, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. (Same as EPHX 615.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, MATH 320 or equivalent, and EECS 138 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of PHSX 521. Lagrange's equations and generalized coordinates. Mechanics of continuous media. Tensor algebra and rotation of a rigid body. Special relativity and relativistic dynamics. (Same as EPHX 621.) Prerequisite: PHSX 521. LEC
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An introduction to basic fluid mechanics in which fundamental concepts and equations are covered. Topics include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave propagation in fluids, and applications in the areas such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, and geophysics. (Same as EPHX 623.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223, and MATH 290. LEC
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Maxwell's equations, wave propagation, optics and waveguides, radiation, relativistic transformations of fields and sources, use of covariance and invariance in relativity. Normally a continuation of PHSX 531. (Same as EPHX 631.) Prerequisite: PHSX 531. LEC
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Experimental methods and elementary concepts in nuclear physics, including nuclear forces, alpha and beta decay, gamma radiation, nuclear structure, and reaction systematics. (Same as EPHX 641.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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Geometric optics. Wave properties of light: interference, diffraction, coherence. Propagation of light through matter. Selected topics in modern optics, e.g., lasers, fibers. (Same as EPHX 655.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 316. LEC
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Properties and interactions of quarks, leptons, and other elementary particles; symmetry principles and conservation laws; broken symmetry; gauge bosons; the fundamental interactions, grand unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; the cosmological implications of elementary particle physics. (Same as EPHX 661.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Development of thermodynamics from statistical considerations. Techniques of calculating thermodynamic properties of systems. Application to classical problems of thermodynamics. Elementary kinetic theory of transport processes. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. (Same as EPHX 671.) Prerequisite: PHSX 611. LEC
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Properties of common types of crystals and amorphous solids. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids. Electrons and holes in energy bands of metals, semi-conductors, superconductors, and insulators. (Same as EPHX 681.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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An introduction to radiation processes, thermal processes, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the interstellar medium. (Same as ASTR 691 and EPHX 691.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An overview of topics relevant to gravitation and modern cosmology: special relativity, tensor notation, the equivalence principle, the Schwarzchild solution, black holes, and Friedmann models. Cosmic black body radiation, dark matter, and the formation of large-scale structure. The idea of quantum gravity and an introduction to the current literature in cosmology. (Same as EPHX 693.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Topics of current interest in physics, astronomy, and atmospheric science. Repeated enrollments are permitted. LEC
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Critique, discussions, and interpretation of the most important discoveries and observations in physics. LEC
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Linear vector spaces. Postulates of quantum mechanics. Schrodinger equation. Harmonic oscillator and other problems in one dimension. Central forces and angular momentum. Symmetries and conservation laws. The hydrogen atom. Spin. Spin and statistics. Addition of angular momenta. Time independent approximation methods. Prerequisite: PHSX 611 and MATH 320. LEC
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First year graduate students meet to survey research opportunities in the department and develop skills in giving oral presentations in physics and related areas. Students will also learn about topics in responsible scholarship that may include: the origin of ideas and the allocation of credit, the treatment of data, scientific misconduct, intellectual property and entrepreneurship, the researcher in society, collaborative research, mentor/trainee responsibilities, and safe practices. LEC
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Review of complex variable theory; introduction to the partial differential equations of physical systems; Fourier analysis; special functions of mathematical physics; and chemistry. (Same as CHEM 718.) Prerequisite: Two semesters of junior-senior mathematics. LEC
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Topics covered may include the following: dynamical systems, attractors, sensitive dependence on initial conditions, chaos, one-dimensional maps, strange attractors and fractal dimensions, fat fractals, the horseshoe map, symbolic dynamics, linear stability of periodic orbits, stable and unstable manifolds, Lyapunov exponents, topological entropy, quasiperiodicity, strange nonchaotic attractors, nonattracting chaotic sets, fractal basin boundaries, renormalization group analysis, intermittency, crisis and chaotic transients. Prerequisite: Mechanics (PHSX 521, or its equivalent), ordinary differential equations (MATH 320, or its equivalent), and some computer programming knowledge. LEC
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Fourier analysis, sampling theory, prediction and interpolation of geophysical data, filtering theory, correlation techniques, deconvolution. Examples will be chosen from various fields of geophysics. (Same as GEOL 772.) Prerequisite: MATH 250/AE 250/ARCE 250/CE 250/C&PE 250/EECS 250/EPHX 250/ME 250 and either GEOL 572 or GEOL 573 or PHSX 528. LEC
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General theory of seismic waves, wave field extrapolation (migration) by finite difference methods, construction of travel-time curves, reflection and attenuation coefficients, earthquake source mechanism, distribution and forecasting of earthquakes. (Same as GEOL 773.) Prerequisite: MATH 250/AE 250/ARCE 250/CE 250/C&PE 250/EECS 250/EPHX 250/ME 250 and either GEOL 572 or GEOL 573 or PHSX 528. LEC
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Reduction and interpretation of gravity and magnetic data with emphasis on exploration techniques. Spectral, analytical and modeling methods of analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies are emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 250/AE 250/ARCE 250/CE 250/C&PE 250/EECS 250/EPHX 250/ME 250 and either GEOL 572 or GEOL 573 or PHSX 528 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Topics to vary with demand and include heat flow, wave propagation, synthetic seismograms, groundwater exploration, geothermal exploration, electrical methods in exploration, rock mechanics-tectonophysics, rock magnetism, geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, geophysical inverse theory, and others upon sufficient demand. May be repeated for different topics. (Same as GEOL 771.) Prerequisite: GEOL 572 or GEOL 573/PHSX 528 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Methods and concepts in contemporary molecular biophysics are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the thermodynamics of macromolecular interactions and quantitative methods of data analysis. Basic enzymology and biophysical spectroscopy will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: PHSX 212, MATH 122, and CHEM 188. LEC
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Experimental methods in nuclear physics, elementary concepts and simple considerations about nuclear forces, alpha and beta decay, gamma radiation, nuclear structure, and reaction systematics. Prerequisite: PHSX 611. LEC
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Particle accelerators and detectors; quarks and leptons; invariance principles and conservation laws; strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions of elementary particles; unification of electroweak and other interactions. Prerequisite: PHSX 711. LEC
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Classification of solids, structure and symmetry of crystals; lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids; electric and magnetic properties; electron theory of metals and semiconductors; electronic and atomic transport processes; theory of ionic crystals. Prerequisite: PHSX 611 (or CHEM 648) and PHSX 671 (or CHEM 646). LEC
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