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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and HWC 524.) Prerequisite: Eastern Civilization course, or a course in Asian history, or a distribution course in Philosophy. LEC
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A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers, with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic corpus. (Same as GRK 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of important representative theories of the justness of an economic system, with particular attention paid to such institutions as private property, a market economy, means and relationships of production, and principles of distribution to individuals. The theorists under consideration include Locke, Adam Smith, Marx and Engels, contemporary utilitarians, Rawls, and Nozick. Prerequisite: A course in ethics or an introductory course in economics or in business. LEC
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The development of philosophy in the 19th century. Special attention will be paid to such major figures as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, and Mill. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC
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A study of the thought of Soren Kierkegaard through examination of some of his major writings. Some attention is given to his influence on the development of existentialist philosophies. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 or PHIL 386. LEC
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A study of Nietzsche's major writings and ideas, with some attention to his philosophical influence. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 or PHIL 386 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A philosophical study of the classical texts of Marxism and of their contemporary development. Prerequisite: A course in philosophy or a course in political science. LEC
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A study of the main themes and leading philosophers of the existentialist movement. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy. LEC
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A study of the main themes and leading philosophers of the phenomenological movement. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC
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A study of selected topics in 20th century European philosophy, such as hermeneutics, critical theory, and poststructuralism. Figures to be studied could include Heidegger, Gadamer, Adorno, Habermas, and Foucault. Prerequisite: PHIL 386. LEC
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Individual reading on topics not covered in course work. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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A survey of the major works of Plato, with attention both to Plato's distinctive arguments and positions in the major areas of philosophy and to the distinctive literary form in which Plato presents his thinking. Prerequisite: PHIL 384. LEC
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A survey of the major works of Aristotle, with the aim of understanding Aristotle's distinctive formulations of central philosophical questions, the arguments he presents for his answers to those questions, and the systematic interconnections between his positions in the different areas of philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 384. LEC
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Survey of Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Scepticism from their beginnings through the second century AD. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and another course in philosophy. LEC
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Propositional calculus, predicate calculus, consistency, decidability of formal systems, the paradoxes and number concept will be covered. LEC
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This course is a workshop in any of a variety of topics in symbolic logic of special importance to contemporary analytic philosophy, such as modal logic, tense logic, axiomatic set theory, Goedel's theorems, model theory, etc. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisite: PHIL 310. LEC
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An examination of conceptual and foundational issues in the natural sciences. Topics may include the methodology of science (the nature and status of laws, the precise way in which experiment contributes to theory) and puzzles concerning the content of science (the status of space and time, the problematic nature of quantum mechanics). Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A critical examination of the methods, concepts, and practices of the social sciences. Topics to be considered may include: theories of explanation, methodological individualism vs. holism, objectivity, the role of rationality, myth and the unconscious in the explanation of behavior, and the value neutrality of science. Prerequisite: One previous course in philosophy, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A systematic treatment of logical theory. Different types of logic will be studied along with their philosophical assumptions, motivations, implications, and uses. Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610. LEC
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An examination of varying conceptions of the role and status of mathematical arguments. Topics may include realism/anti-realism, the consequences of Goedel's Incompleteness Theorems, the role of mathematics in the sciences, and an examination of such historical thinkers as Plato, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Goedel, and Hilbert. Prerequisite: PHIL 310 or PHIL 610, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the nature of language using the methods of analytic philosophy. Topics may include meaning, truth, reference, language and thought, and the nature of linguistic rules. Prerequisite: PHIL 388 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the nature of knowledge. Topics may include the concept of knowledge, knowledge of the external world, induction, theories of justification, and scientific knowledge. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and PHIL 386, PHIL 388 (which may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of some of the central issues in metaphysics. Topics may include causation, the mind-body problem, free will and determinism, modality, natural kinds, the nature of properties, and personal identity. Prerequisite: PHIL 384 and PHIL 386, PHIL 388 (which may be taken concurrently), or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the nature of mind using the methods of analytic philosophy. Topics may include consciousness, perception, propositional attitudes, thought and language, action and intention, mind and body, the prospects for scientific psychology, and personal identity. Prerequisite: PHIL 388 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of some of the central themes and problems in aesthetics, such as the beautiful and the sublime in nature and the arts. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy or graduate standing. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the philosophical issues surrounding individual decision theory, game theory, and social choice theory. This includes issues of scientific theory selection, the nature of preference, the uses of games to model social interaction, and the ethical and political implications of Arrow's impossibility theorem. Formal techniques of modeling and proof, akin to those used in logic and mathematics, will be used in much of the course. Prerequisite: Two courses in economics, a philosophy course numbered 500 or above, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A systematic analysis of the concepts of politics, with reference to representative political theories. Prerequisite: A course in philosophy and a course in political science. LEC
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An examination of some major moral philosophers and some important issues in ethical theory since the beginning of the twentieth century. Topics covered typically include intuitionism, emotivism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and the relationship between morality and rationality. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161 or two courses in philosophy. LEC
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This course addresses the role (if any) that gender plays in constructing ethical theories. Topics include the impact of culture, affect, and the body on our understanding of gender differences and the importance of these differences for ethics. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161, or two previous philosophy courses. LEC
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An interpretive and critical examination of central texts in the history of moral philosophy, which may include works by Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and J.S. Mill. Prerequisite: PHIL 160 or PHIL 161 or two previous philosophy courses. LEC
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An examination of the concept of law and of legal reasoning. In addition, the course may consider such topics as natural law, legal excuses, the relations between law and morality, civil disobedience, civil liberties, the concept of property. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy or one course in philosophy and one course in law or consent of instructor. LEC
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After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis especially as they pertain to the moral impermissibility of murder, particular moral and conceptual issues relating to death and dying in medical contexts will be addressed. Topics such as abortion, infanticide, suicide, euthanasia, the definition of death, and the right to refuse life-saving medical therapy will be included. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology or consent of instructor. LEC
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After a brief survey of techniques of moral argument and analysis, particular moral issues related to the obligations of health care professionals and the rights of patients will be discussed. These will include such matters as confidentiality, truth-telling, informed consent, the ethics of research on human subjects, psychosurgery, the rights of the mentally ill, and the rights of the mentally retarded. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of philosophical, theological and literary monuments designed to acquaint the student with the main cultural forces that have shaped Russian thought and manners. From the origins to Napoleonic times. (Same as SLAV 684.) LEC
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A continuation of SLAV 684 from the age of Pushkin to the present. (Same as SLAV 686.) LEC
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Intensive supervised training in and application of the techniques of research. Required of every graduate student seeking an advanced degree in the first or second semester of enrollment. Passing this tutorial constitutes partial fulfillment of the Ph.D. RSRS requirements. Consent of instructor required for repeating the course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. RSH
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Prerequisite: PHIL 508 or PHIL 605 or PHIL 607 or PHIL 608 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 508 or PHIL 605 or PHIL 607 or PHIL 608 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered by different instructors under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisites to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or PHIL 570 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Gottlob Frege was the founder of the analytic movement in philosophy, having done seminal work in logic, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mathematics. This course will focus on his primary texts as well as his influence on present-day studies. Prerequisite: PHIL 628 or PHIL 630 or PHIL 638 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 560 or PHIL 562 or PHIL 570 or PHIL 582 or PHIL 590 or PHIL 592 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered by different instructors under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: 500-600 level as specified or permission of instructor. LEC
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A systematic study of the major work of W. V. Quine and its influence on subsequent analytic philosophy. Topics will include Quine's theory of meaning, philosophical logic, and philosophy of science. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of Donald Davidson's seminal work in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. Among the topics to be considered will be meaning, truth, interpretation, action, and propositional attitudes. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 620 or PHIL 622 or PHIL 648 or PHIL 650 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 610 or PHIL 628 or PHIL 630 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: PHIL 638 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 650 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 648 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 654 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 670 or PHIL 672 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 555 or PHIL 666 or PHIL 668 or PHIL 674 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores various topics at the intersection of law and philosophy. Content varies but may include: What is freedom and what role should government play in a free society? What is equality and what is the best way to achieve it? What is the relationship between law and social justice? What is the source and value of human rights? Should social and economic rights be legally guaranteed? How should government redress historical injustices such as slavery, apartheid, and the Holocaust? Students must complete a substantial seminar paper. (Same as LAW 962.) LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, such as professional ethics or some issue in business ethics (e.g., corporate responsibility) or in medical ethics (e.g., the definition of death); it may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic, instructor, and specific prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 670 or PHIL 672 or 500-600 level course as specified or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, such as philosophy of a particular social science (e.g., economics, psychology) or a particular issue in the social sciences (e.g., ideology, reductionism), and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topic and instructor and specific prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: PHIL 622 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course may be offered under different subtitles, and may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Topics, instructor, and specific prerequisites to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. LEC
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Six hours of credit will be awarded upon completion of the master's thesis, but no more than six hours of credit may be obtained in this course altogether. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Intensive research in philosophy. This course may be taken through individual arrangement, or in connection with small research seminars which are offered occasionally. Students may only enroll for three hours in any given semester. May be repeated if content varies significantly. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of graduate work. RSH
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Independent research on any topic that a graduate student and a faculty member shall agree on. It shall result in a tightly focused 20-30 page paper. The student's written work will be repeatedly evaluated over the semester by the director, and the final product must be defended in an oral examination conducted by a three-member faculty committee (including the director). Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the Ph.D. program and have successfully completed the Ph.D. core courses requirement. RSH
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This course may be taken more than once, but not for more than twelve hours of credit in any one semester. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Open to students of all disciplines and experience levels, this course provides an introduction to the medium and language of photography. Basic camera operation, workflow, and digital/analog printing methods are explored, accompanied by lectures, readings, and discussions regarding the historical and theoretical concerns of the medium. A digital camera with full manual controls is required - RAW capable preferred. Open to students of all disciplines and experience levels. LAB
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The first of the two-part foundational Photography sequence, this majors-only course provides students with a rigorous immersion into the formal, technical, and conceptual concerns and challenges of photography by way of the view camera. Embracing both the wet and digital darkrooms, students shoot and develop sheet film that is then utilized to produce both traditional and digital prints. Intermediate digital editing methods are introduced and explored. View cameras are provided. Prerequisite: PHMD 101, admitted to Design Department, passed first-year review. LEC
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The second of the two-part foundational Photography sequence, this advanced course builds upon PHMD 201 with additional emphasis on color, RAW workflow, and advanced methods for digital capture, manipulation, editing, and compositing. Additionally, students work extensively with large-format inkjet printers to create custom ICC printing profiles. A digital SLR (RAW capable) camera with full manual controls is required. Prerequisite: PHMD 201, admitted to Design Department, passed first-year review. LAB
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Understanding Photographs is a lecture-based course that focuses on developing a critical understanding of how images, paired with culture and society, generate meaning in both the historical and contemporary contexts. Open to students of all disciplines and experience level. LEC
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Lighting Studio is a fundamental course in awareness, modification, and control of light. Students work extensively with strobe and continuous light sources. Principles of natural and artificial light are introduced, explored, and applied through hands on assignments both in and out of the studio environment. Prerequisite: PHMD 202 or permission of instructor. LAB
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This course serves as an introduction to the principles and challenges of photography as a time-based medium. Fundamental concepts of production are introduced and explored through hands-on exercises, class presentations and discussions, lectures, critiques, and individual and group projects. Prerequisite: PHMD 202 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Experimental Processes is an introduction to the understanding and production of image-based works utilizing experimental approaches and alternative processes in an interdisciplinary environment. Prerequisite: PHMD 202 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This upper-level seminar is focused primarily on the development of independent and collaborative projects through on-going group critique with an emphasis on research and analysis. Learning is focused on personal development and other issues relevant to contemporary photographic practice through assigned readings, presentations, and group discussion. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHMD 202 or instructor permission. LAB
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Taken the final semester of study, this course guides students through the research, preparation, and refinement of a final portfolio and appropriate supplemental materials. Methods and strategies of presentation and dissemination are discussed and explored. Prerequisite: PHMD 402 or instructor permission. LAB
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A continuation of the skills and principles discussed in PHMD 301. Prerequisite: PHMD 301. LEC
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A continuation of the skills and principles discussed in PHMD 302. Prerequisite: PHMD 302. LEC
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A continuation of the skills and principles covered in PHMD 315. Prerequisite: PHMD 315. LEC
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Special topics courses in Photo Media vary by instructor and provide additional opportunities for interdisciplinary research and advanced specialized study. Prerequisite: PHMD 202 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Drug interactions will be presented with an emphasis on evaluating the risk of the interaction in a particular patient. Patient counseling and communication techniques will be covered. Approximately half the class time will be spent covering non-prescription drugs and herbals. Prerequisite: PHAR 500. LEC
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This course is designed to extend the students' understanding of Oncology diseases and treatments beyond what is covered in the Pharmacotherapy series in the School of Pharmacy. Prerequisite: PHPR 646. LEC
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This course provides the fundamentals for developing a medical vocabulary. The student will develop the ability to understand, define and utilize medical terminology and abbreviations used in patient care. LEC
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Students will work at a health-related community center and participate in structured learning exercises. The objectives are to: 1) enable students to learn appropriate strategies to communicate and provide services to people with varying languages, cultures, social, and economic backgrounds, disabilities, illnesses, or impairments, 2) increase social interaction and citizenship, 3) heighten social awareness and understanding of ethical issues, and 4) acknowledge social responsibility and realize personal values. FLD
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This elective course will help students explore the various career paths in pharmacy. Potential topics include, among others, hospital, retail, industry, and academic opportunities in pharmacy. The course will be taught by PHPR faculty and guest presenters. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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This elective course will enhance the pharmacy student's knowledge and understanding of the current theories behind the addiction process, frequently abused drugs and/or chemicals and the treatment and recovery process. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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An elective course designed to help students improve professional communication skills. Prerequisite: PHAR 500. LEC
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The pharmacy school curriculum overflows with science courses leaving students little time for the humanities. Ironically, however, patient-focused care requires pharmacists to have greater skill in observation, communication, and understanding of the psychosocial issues surrounding disease and treatment. The goal of this course is to broaden students' perspective and appreciate of healthcare by viewing it through the arts. LEC
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Public health is more than providing treatment for an illness; it is a concern for the health of an entire population. The ideal is to ensure the health of all. This course will focus on providing students with a solid foundational understanding of what public health is and how pharmacists play a role as a public health provider. The course will cover the concepts and tools used in public health including issues such as: determining health, cultural competence, health promotion, disease prevention, epidemiology and disease, describing populations and community health. Lastly, the course will provide students with specific pharmacist models of public health. Successful models include tobacco cessation programs, community vaccination programs, obesity prevention, tuberculosis monitoring, emergency preparedness and domestic violence. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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This course is designed to prepare the student pharmacist to provide pharmacotherapeutic care to older adults. Common topics such as diabetes in the older adults, urinary incontinence, falls, etc will be covered. The structure of the course requires students with strong motivation and learning skills to succeed. The primary learning structure will include review of guidelines, distinguishing normal aging from disease prevalent in older adults, and application in the form of case studies. Prerequisite: Must be accepted in the Pharmacy Program at KU. LEC
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The United States becomes more culturally diverse every year. This course is designed to help student pharmacists excel in today's multicultural environment by improving their cultural competency skills. Students will explore their own culture and those belonging to other diverse cultures. Students are expected to learn of the beliefs, needs and tendencies of those with cultures much different than themselves. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the School of Pharmacy. LEC
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The student will spend one month in a progressive community pharmacy. The rotation will allow the student to perform the duties of a pharmacist while being supervised by a licensed pharmacist. Emphasis of this rotation will be on the clinical aspects of providing patient-centered pharmaceutical services including medication management, therapeutic substitutions, and patient counseling activities. FLD
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The student will spend one month in a hospital or institutional site pharmacy. The rotation will allow the student to perform the duties of a pharmacist while being supervised by a licensed pharmacist. Emphasis of this rotation will be on the administrative, technical and organizational aspects of Health System Practice. Clinical activities will be maintained throughout this rotation as well as the integration of services with other departments in the facility. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an inpatient acute care facility. Emphasis will be on the student to actively participate in the delivery of pharmaceutical care within a multidisciplinary setting. The student will be acquiring patient specific information, evaluating drug therapy, developing care plans, monitoring therapeutic outcomes and interacting with multidisciplinary healthcare providers. All students will actively participate in rounds, conferences, consultations and other activities as directed by the faculty preceptor. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an inpatient acute care facility. Emphasis will be on the student to actively participate in the delivery of pharmaceutical care within a multidisciplinary setting. The student will be acquiring patient specific information, evaluating drug therapy, developing care plans, monitoring therapeutic outcomes and interacting with multidisciplinary healthcare providers. All students will actively participate in rounds, conferences, consultations and other activities as directed by the faculty preceptor. FLD
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The student will spend one month at a practice site which either provides continuous patient care, clinic visits, collaborative practice agreements or medication therapy management activities. The rotation will allow the student to perform these duties while being supervised by a licensed pharmacist. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an elective experience which is essential to the student's training and personal interest. These experiences will expand the student's understanding of professional opportunities available upon licensure. Students may take required rotations as electives if available. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an elective experience which is essential to the student's training and personal interest. These experiences will expand the student's understanding of professional opportunities available upon licensure. Students may take required rotations as elective if available. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an elective experience which is essential to the student's training and personal interest. These experiences will expand the student's understanding of professional opportunities available upon licensure. Students may take required rotations as elective if available. FLD
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The student will spend one month in an elective experience which is essential to the student's training and personal interest. These experiences will expand the student's understanding of professional opportunities available upon licensure. Students may take required rotations as elective if available. FLD
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The student will spend one month in a Drug Information Center. Emphasis is on the activities which will enhance skills in retrieval, critical evaluation, and interpretation of primary literature. The student will participate in answering drug information questions and preparing documents for a P&T committee. FLD
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In Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes students will study health care economics from both a macro and micro basis with a primary focus on pharmacy economic issues as applied to our health care practices as well as health outcomes research. This course will incorporate lecture, readings, case exercises, and guided discussions to accomplish these goals and will utilize distance learning techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-traditional Pharm. D. program. LEC
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