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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of endocrinology and associated pharmacology. The student will attend P&TX 631 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussions of advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Pharmacology and Toxicology Program. LEC
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of energy metabolism and obesity, gastrointestinal pharmacology, and vitamins. The student will attend P&TX 633 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussion of advanced material on the topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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An examination of basic principles of molecular biology, immunology, and protein chemistry as they apply to the identification, production, stability, delivery, and monitoring of new therapeutic agents provided by the expanding biotechnology industry. Students will attend lectures in P&TX 633 and meet separately with faculty for additional discussions of more advanced material on these topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Pharmacology and Toxicology. LAB
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Experimental approaches to understanding mechanism of drug action. Use of drugs as tools to understand functioning of biological systems will also be stressed. Historically important experiments will be discussed along with experiments which are currently used to define drug mechanisms. Topics will include: dose-response, drug receptors, drug metabolism, chemotherapy as well as autonomic CNS, cardiovascular and renal pharmacology. (Same as MDCM 742.) Prerequisite: BIOL 600 and BIOL 726 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The molecular basis involved in the poisoning and detoxification process will be covered. Topics will include drug metabolism and disposition, chemical, genetic, and developmental toxicology. Prerequisite: BIOL 600, BIOL 762 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A detailed study of the molecular aspects of nerve transmission will be covered with special emphasis on the uptake, storage, release, biosynthesis, and metabolism of specific neurotransmitters. Drugs affecting these processes and current research on receptor isolation and receptor mechanisms will be discussed from a chemical viewpoint. (Same as BIOL 775, CHEM 775, MDCM 775, NURO 775, and PHCH 775.) Prerequisite: BIOL 600 or equivalent. LEC
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A review of current literature and research in pharmacology and toxicology. Required of all graduate students in the department every fall and spring semester. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in P&TX. LEC
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This course is to be used by graduate students fulfilling the teaching requirements for the Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology. The student will function as a discussion leader and lecturer in a limited number of class sessions. Each student will meet with the faculty whom he or she is assisting. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology program. RSH
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Lectures and discussion on ethical issues in the conduct of a scientific career, with emphasis on practical topics of special importance in molecular-level research in the chemical, biological, and pharmaceutical sciences. Topics will include the nature of ethics, the scientist in the laboratory, the scientist as author, grantee, reviewer, employer/employee, teacher, student, and citizen. Discussions will focus on case histories. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. (Same as MDCM 801, NURO 801, PHCH 801 and PHCH 802.) LEC
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This course is designed for graduate students and will fulfill the first written exam requirement for the Ph.D. in pharmacology and Toxicology. The student will research and write a six page literature review by choosing a topic provided by the faculty. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Pharmacology and Toxicology Program. LEC
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The course will cover basic techniques of moral reasoning, especially as applied to ethical issues in the physical sciences and engineering. Topics covered will include the ethical conduct of research, the federal and professional guidelines for different kinds of research, and the ethical dimensions of publication and professional life. Emphasis will be on practical applications, cases and student involvement. (Same as GS 804, MDCM 804, NURO 804, and PHCH 804.) Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the program or division of Pharmacy to enroll in this class. LEC
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This course is designed for graduate students and will fulfill the second written exam requirement for the Ph.D. in pharmacology and Toxicology. The student will research and write a twelve page literature review by choosing a topic provided by the faculty. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Pharmacology and Toxicology Program. LEC
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Original investigations at an advanced level in the areas of pharmacology or toxicology or related fields. This research will be performed by graduate students in collaboration with a faculty member. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. RSH
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Hours and credit to be arranged. Independent investigation of a research problem of limited scope. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in P&TX and consent of instructor. THE
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Through the use of both traditional didactic and student participatory instructional methods, the seminar will address basic pharmacological concepts (i.e., assimilation, distribution, elimination, dose effect analyses, kinetics, etc.), neuropharmacological principles (i.e., neuronal mechanisms of action of psychotropic drugs, animal models of human psychiatric disorders, etc.), and therapeutics (i.e., drug treatment of psychosis, depression, Alzheimer's disease, etc.). Special attention will be devoted to the organism's age (and history) as these may influence psychopharmacological outcomes. LEC
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This course will examine the bases for reciprocal dynamic interactions between central nervous system function and structure ("nature") and experience ("nurture"). "Nature" will be explored using principles and methodologies derived from systems and molecular pharmacology, and neurochemistry. The effects of "nurture" on brain will involve issues derived from behavioral pharmacology, environmental, enrichment, and human brain imaging. During the course, with the help of the instructor, students will be expected to discuss and critically analyze research articles for subsequent presentation to the class. LEC
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A study of drug effects at the cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels, and the correlation with tissue and organ reactions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in P&TX and consent of instructor. LEC
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Advanced level research in collaboration with a faculty member in the department. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Doctoral degree or equivalent in an appropriate related area, and consent of instructor. RSH
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Hours and credit to be arranged. Original investigation in pharmacology and toxicology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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The basic mechanisms of human disease, including cellular pathology, inflammation, diseases of immunity, neoplasia, infectious and circulatory diseases and aging are considered through the mechanisms of lectures, small-group problem based care study and autopsy demonstration. Prerequisite: Courses in cell biology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalents. LEC
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Human disease is studied by organ systems to include cardiovascular, hematologic, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and nervous system diseases. The pathobiology of all major diseases occurring within each organ system are considered by lectures, problem based case study and autopsy participation. Since final comprehensive examination at the end of Pathology II will include material from both Pathology I and Pathology II. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pathology LEC
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A detailed study of diseases involving the endocrine, genitourinary, neuromuscular, and skeletal systems. Prerequisite: PATH 800 and courses in histology, biochemistry, and physiology, or equivalent. LEC
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Current concepts in the study of stem cells, and the clinical potential in modern disease treatment. Students will learn concepts of stem cells: origin, regulation of pluripotency, and differentiative potential; experimental isolation and manipulation; and clinical application of isolated stem cells. Current scientific literature will be used to highlight recent advances in stem cell biology. Special emphasis will be placed on the ethical and legal issues surrounding the use of stem cells of both adult and embryonic origin. Prerequisite: Course in cell biology (IGPBS module 4, or equivalent); consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the basic principles and contemporary literature of signal transduction pathways involved in cancer development and developmental biology. Faculty lecture and student presentations will address selected topics in cellular signal transduction. Student seminars will focus on the scientific content of the publication with emphasis on appropriate presentation of background information, experimental methods, results and potential future directions. Critical discussion of papers will be provided by participating students and faculty. Prerequisite: Course in Molecular Biology (IGPBS module 3, or equivalent). LEC
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Presentation of Pathology Department graduate student research-in-progress. Students will conduct a one-hour seminar in which updates of their current research project(s) in pathology will be reported. The seminars are interactive and students are encouraged to participate in discussion of the presented work. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum and status as a second-year graduate student; consent of instructor. RSC
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Current concepts in epigenetic regulation of transcription, including its involvement in disease. Current scientific literature will be used to examine recent advances in the role of epigenetic regulation in transcription and its impact on cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, development, and disease. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of epigenetic regulation and the role of the epigenetic regulation in various gene expression systems. The role of epigenetics in long-range DNA interactions will also be studied, with an emphasis on enhancer, silencer, and locus control region function. Recent advances in the role of epigenetics in disease, including cancer will also be examine. The course will examine current experimental methods to study epigenetics and gene regulation. Prerequisite: Completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or equivalent; consent of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course in which students may select no more than three of the following: electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cell typing, morphometrics, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, DNA probe, autopsy technique. LAB
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Normal bone development, ultrastructure of bone, and the calcification mechanism. Developmental and genetic abnormalities of bone including dwarfism and osteogenesis imperfecta. Metabolic bone diseases including osteoporosis, Paget's disease and osteomalacia. Methods of diagnosis by morphometry of undecalcified bone biopsy. Common primary bone tumors, and the mechanism of bone loss or bone over growth caused by metastatic malignant tumors. There will be practical laboratory portion. Prerequisite: PATH 800 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Microbial factors, host reaction, and disease. Emphasis on recovery from infection, response to reinfection, the resultant clearance of microbes, or the development of chronic infection. Hypersensitivity phenomena will also be considered in the light of data from transplantation immunity. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LAB
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Offered by arrangement. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and completion of the IGPBS core curriculum or its equivalent. IND
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This course will teach the fundamentals of writing a grant proposal with an emphasis on NIH proposals. This course is open to any graduate students interested in applying for pre-doctoral fellowships, and especially to graduate students in the Department of Pathology who will be conducting their comprehensive qualifying exams in the upcoming year. This course involves a combination of didactic lectures, student coursework and discussion. This course will include different principal investigators from the Pathology Department as guest speakers. Topics will include different sources of funding, grant submission and post-submission review process. However, the core component of this course will involve teaching the basic framework and components of an NIH R01 application. This course is designed to give practical structural guidance in scientific writing at a professional level and does not give guidance on specific research projects. Prerequisites: IGPBS coursework or equivalent, permission of instructor. LEC
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A lecture and literature review course in which molecular, subcellular, and supracellular organization and function are considered in normal and disease states. Prerequisite: PATH 800. LEC
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Multidisciplinary approach. Cancer pathology. Mutagenesis. Genetics. Carcinogen metabolism. Signal Transduction, Apoptosis. Initiation and promotion. Tumor Immunology. Cell proliferation. Protooncogenes and suppressor genes. Hormonal carcinogenesis. Cancer epidemiology. Anglogenesis. Dietary and environmental causation and prevention. Cancer in various organ systems. (Same as PHCL 939 and PTOX 939.) Prerequisite: Completion of one of the following: IGPBS modules 1-4 or equivalent or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the content and methods of peace studies. Peace studies is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to the study of war and peace. Building on and integrating the work of various fields of study, the course examines the causes of structural and direct violence within and among societies and the diverse ways in which humans have sought peace from conquest and balance of power to international organizations and nonviolent strategies. LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and EURS 329.) LEC
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A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1515) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as EURS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
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This course offers specialized or interdisciplinary perspectives on historical, political, social, and religious movements, institutions, societies, agencies, or texts dealing with conflict resolution. May be repeated for credit with different topics. LEC
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This course reviews the history, aims and methodology of peace education. Topics include examination of the roots and causes of social violence; educational initiatives that seek to reduce structural and direct violence; and teaching methodologies in the field of multicultural education and pedagogy. LEC
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Practicum or research under the supervision of a faculty member and with the approval of the Peace and Conflict Studies Minor. Individual conferences, reports, and papers, and, in the case of practicum, supervised experience with an approved organization or agency. Prerequisite: Completion of three core courses in the minor. IND
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Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as EURS 565.) LEC
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This capstone seminar provides a sustained and in-depth study of a particular topic in Peace and Conflict Studies, to be chosen by the instructor. Each student is required to carry out a substantive research project to produce a term paper or comparable work. Required for completion of minor. Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least nine hours in the minor before enrolling. LEC
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Research under the supervision of a faculty member and approved for the Peace and Conflict Studies program. Individual conferences, reports, and papers; may be combined with classwork. Open only to graduate students. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of the historic literature on human conflict and peacemaking and the methods used to analyze and interpret the literature. Peace literature encompasses a range of genres that include religious teachings, philosophical essays, political proposals, treaties and conventions, fiction, poetry, and drama. Approaches to solutions to human conflict cover a spectrum including political revolution, diplomacy and treaties, international law and organizations, and world government. Students produce a substantial graduate-level research project. PCS 801 is required for the Graduate Certificate in Peace & Conflict Studies, and to be taken as early as possible in the students program of study. Open only to graduate students. LEC
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The capstone of the Graduate Certificate program, providing a sustained and in-depth study of a particular topic in Peace & Conflict Studies, to be chosen by the instructor. The members of the seminar have the option of doing a research project or supervised practicum resulting in a substantial paper that integrates their work in the program. Required for the Graduate Certificate and open only to graduate students. Prerequisite: At least six hours of course work toward the Graduate Certificate including PCS 801. SEM
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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One lesson per week. Small group instruction. For freshmen and sophomores. A course designed to develop drum set technique, with emphasis placed on understanding the various styles of music to perform on the set: swing, jazz, rock, ethnic, Broadway shows. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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One lesson per week. Small group instruction. For juniors and seniors. A course designed to develop drum set technique, with emphasis placed on understanding the various styles of music to perform on the set: swing, jazz, rock, ethnic, Broadway shows. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in percussion. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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For graduate students majoring in percussion. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three credits. IND
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A study of the interpretive problems encountered in percussion music from the various historical periods, and a study of the performance practices in orchestral, band, chamber ensemble, and solo literature. LEC
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Individual instruction. Open only to students who have been admitted to the D.M.A. curriculum in percussion. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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For freshmen and sophomores. Study and performance of works for various percussion instrument combinations. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Study and performance of works for various percussion instrument combinations. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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PHAR 500 is a didactic course designed to introduce the student pharmacist to the concepts of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiential Education, fulfill pre-requisites needed prior to IPPE site placement and to prepare the student for participation in the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences. The course will address topics such as professionalism, confidentiality, patient interaction, medical and drug histories, blood borne pathogens and CPR. Students must be accepted to the school of pharmacy to be eligible to enroll. FLD
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Introduction to the prescription dispensing process within health-system pharmacies (hospital, nursing home, home health, HMO) with an emphasis on distribution systems, parenteral, and sterile products. Incorporates lectures, case studies, pharmacy visits and laboratory experience. Prerequisite: PHPR 502. LEC
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This course will provide students with the training and resources/materials necessary to: a) identify at-risk patient populations needing immunizations, b) work with other health-care professionals to establish and promote a successful pharmacy-based immunization service, c) act as either vaccine advocate or immunizer when appropriate, and d) promote public health by helping the patients they serve avoid vaccine-preventable communicable diseases. LEC
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An introduction to the profession of pharmacy addressing issues such as 1) academic expectations, 2) professional expectations, 3) ethics, 4) various career pathways, and 5) medical communication. Students must be accepted to the school of pharmacy to be eligible to enroll. LEC
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This course is comprised of a survey of historical highlights of the development of Pharmacy as a discipline. The course will cover early antecedents of pharmacy, development of the discipline in Europe and the United States, the development of professional organizations, standards, education, and literature, economic development, and the pharmacists' contributions to community service, science, and the industry. There will be a mix of some lectures, discussion, assigned readings, and short papers. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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Exercises that reinforce the concepts taught in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology courses. Includes exercises in compounding, dispensing and patient counseling. LAB
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Exercises that reinforce the concepts taught in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology courses. Includes exercises in compounding, dispensing, and patient counseling. LAB
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Exercises that reinforce the concepts taught in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology courses. Includes exercises in compounding, dispensing, and patient counseling. LAB
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Exercises that reinforce the concepts taught in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology courses. Includes exercises in compounding, dispensing, and patient counseling. LAB
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Exercises that reinforce the concepts taught in pharmacy practice, pharmaceutical chemistry, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology courses. Includes exercises in compounding, dispensing, and patient counseling. LAB
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A required four credit hour experiential course involving 160 hours of on-site experiential education. The course is designed to provide the student pharmacist with exposure to the practice of pharmacy in either an independent community or chain pharmacy in either a rural or urban setting within the state of Kansas. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Completion of PHAR 500 or instructor consent. FLD
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A required four credit hour experiential course years involving 160 hours of on-site experiential education. The course is designed to provide the student pharmacist with exposure to the practice of pharmacy in an institutional health-system (hospital) environment in either a rural or urban setting within the state of Kansas. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Completion of PHAR 502 or instructor consent. FLD
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An introduction to the health care system of the United States. On completion of the course the student will better understand the impact on pharmacy of changes in financing and technology. Enrollment limited to pharmacy majors. LEC
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In Physical assessment, students will learn how to utilize the available instruments to take blood pressures, temperatures, doing eye/ear exams, palpate/ausculate internal organs, and the most common skin conditions seen by a pharmacist. Chemical assessment will involve the students learning how drugs and disease change physiological fluid content, identification methods, and therapeutic monitoring through case study discussion and presentations. Prerequisite: Admission into the Non-traditional Pharm.D. program. LEC
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This course presents discussions on physiological and disease state variables in pharmacokinetics for selected drugs and drug classes, and instructs students in the use of physiological and disease state pharmacokinetic information to develop individualized therapeutic regimens. Prerequisite: PHCH 625 and PHCH 626. LEC
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This course presents discussions and clinical examples on physiological and disease state variables in pharmacokinetics for selected drugs and drug classes, and instructs students in the use of physiological and disease state pharmacokinetic information to develop or individualized therapeutic regimens. Delivery of this course will involve some aspects of distance learning. Prerequisite: Admission into the Non-traditional Pharm.D. program. LEC
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This elective class will explore emerging areas of research currently impacting the pharmaceutical industry. Potential topics include; biologicals as therapeutics, drug targeting, prodrugs, nanotechnology, biological barriers, gene therapy, transporters, vaccines, intracellular drug trafficking, controlled release drug delivery, cancer therapy, analytical biotechnology and many others. The class will be team taught by PHCH faculty and guest speakers. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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This elective class will explore emerging areas of research currently impacting the pharmaceutical industry. Potential topics include; biologicals as therapeutics, drug targeting, prodrugs, nanotechnology, biological barriers, gene therapy, transporters, vaccines, intracellular drug trafficking, controlled release drug delivery, cancer therapy, analytical biotechnology and many others. The class will be team taught by PHCH faculty and guest speakers. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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This class will explore both the costs and time lines required for the approval of both new as well as generic drug products from identification of drug targets to FDA approval, and Phase 4 studies. Included will be a short history of the establishment of the FDA and its evolving role. The contributions of Frances Kelsey, the FDA scientist who fought the approval of thalidomide in the USA and thus saved many from the trauma of birth defects caused by the drug will be discussed. The class will be team taught by pharmaceutical chemistry faculty and guest speakers. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. Prerequisite: Completion of PHCH 626 or instructor permission. LEC
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This special topics course will cover the "public's perception" of drug discovery and development. This course is organized around a recently published book entitled "Drug Truths: Dispelling the Myths about Pharma R&D" (John Wiley & Sons, 2009). This book was written by John L. La Mattina, who was formally President of Pfizer Global Research ad Development. The course will address the following public myths about drug discovery and development: Cholesterol drugs are unnecessary, industry is more interested in "me-too" drugs than innovation, it takes industry too long to discover new drugs, drugs are discovered by academia, new medicines add cost but little benefit, big Pharma has failed and should learn from Biotech success, the industry invents diseases, new drugs are less safe than traditional medicine, industry spends more on advertising than R&D, and industry does not care about diseases of the developing world. Graded on a Satisfactory/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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An introduction to the mathematics involved in filling prescriptions and in manufacturing pharmaceuticals. Includes an introduction to standard prescription notation and familiarization with pharmaceutical weights and measures. LEC
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Physical properties of pharmaceutical solutions and their physiological compatibility will be discussed (intermolecular interactions, energetics, colligative properties, isotonicity, pH, buffers and drug solubility). Kinetics and mechanisms of drug degradation in solution will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PHCH 517. LEC
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Vaccines are currently the most powerful therapeutic approach available for infectious disease and promise to become of increasing importance for a wide variety of other pathologies including cancer. This course discusses the immunological basis of vaccinology, types of vaccines currently available and in development and the process by which vaccines are made from the basic research stage through their pharmaceutical development and marketing. Ethical aspects of vaccine use will also be considered. Course graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. LEC
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A discussion of the basic concepts, and some clinical applications, of pharmacokinetics, clearance concepts, extravascular dosing, and the use of pharmacokinetics in dosage regimen design and adjustment. Prerequisite: PHCH 517 and PHCH 518. LEC
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A study of biological barriers to drug delivery, conventional dosage forms, and new and future drug delivery strategies. Prerequisite: PHCH 517, PHCH 518, and PHCH 625. LEC
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A lecture-discussion course concerned with identification of the contents of physiological fluids, changes in physiological fluid content induced by disease and drugs, and therapeutic drug monitoring: case study discussions and presentations are coordinated with the integrated laboratory. Prerequisite: Fifth-year standing and concomitant enrollment in integrated laboratory. LEC
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A study of selected topics of current interest which are pertinent to the area of pharmacy. This course is normally reserved as a didactic one that is offered occasionally when there is a special subject to be taught for one semester only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Student will be assigned a suitable research project in the area of pharmaceutical analysis or pharmaceutics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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A student will be assigned a suitable research project in an area of pharmaceutical analysis or pharmaceutics. This course is offered regularly by the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry to meet the special needs of selected students, usually for one of the following two situations: (1) This course may be taken when a student has a special interest in a problem or area of limited scope and desires to pursue that study in depth under supervision of a member of the faculty. (2) This course is sometimes used as a remedial class to provide a mechanism of intensive review and study in an area of weakness. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Discussions, lectures, and laboratory work designed to acquaint and provide hands on experiences to advanced undergraduate and graduate students with experimental design, methods, and approaches relevant to modern research in pharmaceutical chemistry. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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First semester of a two-semester course. The course is designed to introduce the most important and basic concepts, methods, and tools used in Bioinformatics. Topics include (but not limited to) bioinformatics databases, sequence and structure alignment, protein structure prediction, protein folding, protein-protein interaction, Monte Carlo simulation, and molecular dynamics. Emphasis will be put on the understanding and utilization of these concepts and algorithms. The objective is to help the students to reach rapidly the frontier of bioinformatics and be able to use the bioinformatics tools to solve the problems on their own research. (Same as BINF 701.) LEC
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Second semester of a two-semester course in bioinformatics and computational biology. The course is designed to introduce the most important and basic concepts, methods, and tools used in Bioinformatics. Topics include (but not limited to) bioinformatics databases, sequence and structure alignment, protein structure prediction, protein folding, protein-protein interaction, Monte Carlo simulation, and molecular dynamics. Emphasis will be put on the understanding and utilization of these concepts and algorithms. The objective is to help the students to reach rapidly the frontier of bioinformatics and be able to use the bioinformatics tools to solve the problems on their own research. (Same as BINF 702.) LEC
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Communicating research proposals and experimental findings is a critical skill for scientists. Successful communication depends on clarity of thought and careful use of language. This course will use class discussions with examples and homework assignments to help prepare the graduate student to successfully communicate in both academia or industry settings. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Must be accepted to the Pharmacy Program. LEC
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The course will survey the latest technology for delivering pharmaceuticals and biologicals to reduce side effects and enhance drug efficacy. The course will survey the latest research in this area and examine more classical delivery methods. A qualitative and quantitative understanding of drug delivery practice and theory is the goal. Prerequisite: Master's or PhD candidate in Engineering, Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry, or Pharmaceutical Chemistry (by appointment for seniors or graduate students in departments not listed). LEC
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