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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An overview of psychiatric disorders and their impact on person variables and occupational performance is provided along with general occupational therapy approaches to these disorders. Includes DSM classifications, psychotropic drugs, behavioral interventions, and an appreciation for the experience of the person with a mental illness. LEC
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This course focuses on adapting and modifying occupations and activities to meet variations in performance skill and person abilities (body functions/structures). An understanding of occupation as a therapeutic medium and the appropriate selection of intervention strategies will be emphasized. LEC
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This course provides an overview of the occupational therapy evaluation process. Selection, interpretation, and documentation of assessments will be examined. Assessment of occupational performance across the lifespan will be addressed and will include standardized, non-standardized assessments within a person centered and contextually relevant approach. LEC
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An elective course to allow students to pursue areas of special interest under direction of faculty of his or her choice. Investigation of special issues relevant to an aspect of occupational therapy practice will include study of pertinent practice factors. Student will complete special projects relevant to the practice areas, such as oral presentation, written paper or case analyses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of department and instructor (offered Spring, Summer and Fall). IND
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Using a problem based clinical reasoning approach this course examines the impact of common medical conditions on occupational performance with individuals of all ages. Students will practice developing plans and interventions for occupational performance problems presented by varying conditions. LEC
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This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of how the systems in which service occurs impact practice. Financial, regulatory, and personnel issues across a variety of systems will be addressed. LEC
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This course emphasizes entry level skills related to supervision, teamwork, and communication within practice environments. LEC
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In a series of modules this course introduces the student to selected occupational therapy practice models. Theoretical background, assessments, and interventions approaches common to each model are described. The lab component of this class consists of two parts: 1) learning of assessment and intervention techniques specific to different practice models and 2) practice in selecting and applying appropriate practice models for different occupational performance problems. LEC
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An introduction to the research process including research design, methods, sampling, measurement, and research ethics. Qualitative and quantitative research are discussed. Research consumer skills are emphasized. LEC
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Selected field experiences provide opportunities for critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of contexts and service provision models where occupational therapy is provided to persons with disabilities. Students will have opportunities to provide assessment and intervention to at least one individual in two different settings, under the supervision of an occupational therapy fieldwork educator. Students will determine the relevant variables for intervention, work collaboratively with others within the setting and analyze and reflect upon their experience as they prepare for Level II fieldwork experiences. LEC
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Focused study of theory application, professional topics and skills, and emerging practice questions. Learning experiences may be in the form of guided readings and discussion, directed projects, seminars, or community/clinical experience with focus on advanced supplemental or exploratory learning. Specific topics and formats will vary as they are generated by student interest and faculty expertise. LEC
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Student will apply the clinical reasoning process to individuals with occupational performance needs. Cases will be presented from the student's Level II fieldwork experience. In a problem solving format, student will evaluate services received by the individual and discuss alternatives given a variety of situations. LEC
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Students will analyze key professional, political, and cultural issues and trends that impact service provision and the populations served by occupational therapists. LEC
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Exploration of professional responsibilities, professional career development opportunities, and preparations for employment. Service management content will build on previous service management courses, and will develop an understanding of leadership, administration, and management of occupational therapy services. LEC
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Through lecture and seminar groups, student will use clinical reasoning to examine various systems that impact service delivery. Students will complete a program evaluation project based on their experiences during their level II fieldwork. LEC
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A required full-time, three-month supervised experience in a facility meeting specified criteria. Qualified occupational therapists supervise the experience. Students will be exposed to a variety of age ranges and disabilities within different service delivery systems. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework. LEC
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A required full-time, three-month supervised experience in a facility meeting specified criteria. Qualified occupational therapists will supervise this experience. Students will be exposed to a variety of age ranges and disabilities within different service delivery systems. Ages, disabilities, and service provision systems for this course will differ from the student's prior fieldwork experience. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework. LEC
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Concepts and theories related to providing health care to complex systems and aggregates in the community, state, nation and world are explored. Emphasis is placed on the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and wellness and the prevention of disease. Internal and external environmental components which include historical, political, social, cultural and economic factors are presented. The role of the health care provider in identifying, prioritizing and meeting the health and life participation needs of aggregates is discussed. LEC
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An elective (optional) supervised experience in a facility meeting specific criteria. Qualified occupational therapist will supervise this experience. This fieldwork would allow students to pursue areas of special interest. Length and time commitment of experience will be commensurate with credit hours (e.g. each credit requires 80 hours of fieldwork contact at specified site). Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of required academic coursework and OCTH 770.. LEC
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This course will address the parameters and criteria for evidence-based practice. Students will evaluate the status, beliefs, and practice of the profession, and will develop skills at synthesizing and presenting evidence to service recipients. Students will also formulate a decision-making paradigm for their future practice decisions. LEC
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Students in this course will carry out a research project with the guidance of a faculty mentor, and write a research paper reporting the results of their study. Students will achieve competency in scientific writing and use of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Prerequisite: OCTH 727. Students from programs outside the MS in Occupational Therapy or PHD in Therapeutic Science need to contact the Occupational Therapy Department for permission to enroll. LEC
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For freshmen and sophomores. Four hours full rehearsal and one hour sectional (string only) rehearsal each week throughout the school year. An intensive study of the symphonic repertoire, instrumental and vocal accompaniments, and complete major opera. Two public concerts each semester and numerous out-of-town concerts, radio broadcasts, and local vespers performances. Acceptance for membership and playing positions is determined by tryout. LAB
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Two hours of rehearsal per week. May be repeated for credit. Audition required. LAB
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A reading orchestra, emphasizing standard orchestral works from Baroque through modern periods. Open to string, wind, and percussion instrument players of the community and university. (Does not count toward ensemble requirement for students with stringed instruments emphasis.) LAB
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. LAB
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Two hours rehearsal per week. May be repeated for credit. Audition required. LAB
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May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Studio performance of works prepared under individual instruction. May be repeated. LAB
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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A class in the performance of advanced organ repertoire. For organ majors only or by consent of instructor. May be repeated. LAB
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A one-week intensive study program in performance, practice, and literature, advanced pedagogy, and church music. Normally offered during the summer session. May be repeated for credit. Graded S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). IND
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For seniors and graduate students majoring in organ or by permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Materials and methods of pedagogy. Lectures, discussion, demonstration teaching, planning, and evaluation. One beginning or lower level organ student assigned to each class member with teaching done under supervision of class instructor. LEC
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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A class in the performance of advanced organ repertoire. For organ majors only or by consent of instructor. May be repeated. LAB
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For graduate students not majoring in organ. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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Studio performance of works prepared under individual instruction. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Acoustics; design, construction, and maintenance of organs; organ consulting, examination of organs. LEC
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Organ literature and organ design from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Spanish, Italian, and English Baroque. LEC
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Organ literature and organ design in the Dutch and German Baroque with special emphasis on J.S. Bach. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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French organ literature and organ design from the 17th century to the present. LEC
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German, North American, British, Scandinavian and Eastern European organ literature and organ design from the Classic era to the present. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An exploration of selected topics in organ design and literature. Topics change by semester. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Philosophy, methods, and materials of organ pedagogy. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Study of European or North American organs through reading and site visits to instruments. LEC
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For graduate students majoring in organ. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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A detailed study of organ repertoire, performance practice, the history of organ building as it affects the performance of a particular body of literature, liturgical or other extra-musical contexts, and other influences on musical style. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. LEC
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Individual instruction. Open only to students who have been admitted to the D.M.A. program in organ. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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Maximum credit, seven hours. THE
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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Students will apply a clinical reasoning process to individuals with occupational performance needs. Cases will be presented from students' clinical experiences. In a problem solving format, students will evaluate models of service delivery, evaluation and intervention delivery and dissemination of information received by the individual. Students will identify and discuss alternatives given a variety of situations and environments. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC
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This course is designed to support and correspond with OTD 780. Students will be matched with a faculty mentor as they develop a literature review in an area of clinical interest. This experience is designed to supplement students' ongoing clinical practice as they develop a library of pertinent empirical readings. Students will be mentored as they develop skills in analytical reading and identification of information that informs best practice. PREREQUISITE: Admission to OTD Program or Permission of Instructor. LEC
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This course will coordinate with OCTH 776. The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and theories related to providing health care to complex systems and aggregates in the community, state and nation. Emphasis is placed on the promotion, maintenance and restoration of health and wellness and the prevention of disease. Internal and external environmental components which include historical, political, social, cultural and economic factors are presented. The role of the health care provider in identifying, prioritizing and meeting the health and life participation needs of aggregates is discussed. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LEC LEC
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This course is designed to support and correspond with OTD 770. Students will complete this course as they work in a clinical environment. They will meet with a faculty mentor to support the analysis and dissemination of their empirical information gathered during OTD 770. They will present their empirical literature findings to their professional colleagues via a clinical research forum. Students will be expected to create three forms of information dissemination and critically review the professional feedback they receive. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LAB
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This course will coordinate with OTCH 783. Students will address the parameters and criteria for evidence-based practice. They will build a library of information that facilitates their evaluation of the status, beliefs, and practice of Occupational Therapy. They will develop skill in the synthesis of empirical evidence and explore dissemination options to service recipients. Students' work will culminate in the formulation of a decision-making paradigm for their future practice decisions. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC
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This is an elective course that allows students to pursue areas of special interest under the direction of a faculty member of his or her choice. This course is designed to support students' learning as they complete their pre-doctoral studies. Investigation of special issues relevant to an aspect of occupational therapy practice will include study of pertinent practice factors. Students will complete special projects relevant to the practice areas of interest, such as an oral presentation, written paper, or case analysis. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC
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This course is an introduction to qualitative research techniques. Students will have several opportunities to gain hands-on experience using fundamental qualitative research techniques to sharpen their data collection, analysis and write-up skills. The goals of this course are to better understand the role qualitative techniques play in research, identify various ethical issues, sharpen interview and observation skills, and develop foundation skills for collecting, analyzing and interpreting qualitative data. Prerequisite: Permission of Department. Lecture course. LEC
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Research relevant to therapeutic intervention comes from a variety of disciplines involving varied research designs and analysis strategies. Students in this course will examine selected research studies and gain skill in analyzing methods and results as well as in applying research findings to practical problems. Students will conduct a systematic review on a specific area of occupational therapy practice. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide practical learning whereby students receive individual mentorship for the development, implementation and evaluation of a teaching experience. Students will be responsible for developing the material, instructing students, grading assignments and evaluating the teaching experience. The teaching experience is expected to include at least 12 hours of face to face instruction (or the equivalent in on-line teaching or written materials). Teaching experiences can include MOT program lectures or labs, continuing education workshops, patient education programs, or staff inservices or another experience that meets the time and competency requirements. Prerequisite: A graduate level teaching methods course such as NSG 873, NSG 874, C & T 740, C& T 840 PRA
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This course will cover major theoretical frameworks and practice models in occupational therapy. The history of occupational therapy will be included to provide a basis for understanding the evolution of the profession as well as past and current issues and trends. Students will learn how to critically analyze theories, evaluate research evidence related to specific theories and practice models, and assess pragmatic issues in applying practice models to specific settings and populations. LEC
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This course is designed to critically review Occupational Therapy theories, research, practice models and frameworks using the tenets of occupation based practice. Students will analyze seminal literature from occupational science and relate theory and evidence to practice. Students will review their specified area of practice to develop a proposed method of practice that incorporates empirical evidence and practice methods. Finally, students will select a mentor from their practice area to review their proposal. Critical feedback will be incorporated into a final presentation and paper. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC
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This course will explore professional development from an advanced practice perspective. Students will examine aspects of advanced practice such as leadership (both work and professional), management, group and system communication and change agency. They will explore these topics within their current practice settings and select an area of advanced skills to explore in more depth. Students will develop an understanding of how they can impact systems and contribute to the development of the occupational therapy profession. LEC
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Leadership in areas of specialty practice will require our graduates to critically evaluate their practice programs. In this course, students will explore the traditional and innovative ways to evaluate professional services and systems, and they will develop skills to conduct program evaluations. Students will examine the purpose and process of program evaluations in a variety of clinical settings. Through lecture, discussion and a project they will develop and execute a program evaluation in their area of practice. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department. LEC
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This practicum is designed to span 400 hours. Students will identify an area of practice through which they want to develop clinical initiatives and leadership. Selected field experiences will provide opportunities for program development, leadership, and information dissemination. Upon completion, the students will provide his or her clinical team with a program, or research based initiative, along with specified program evaluation methods. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department and continuous enrollment until completion of competencies. LAB
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The capstone project will comprise a written report that involves both literature and field research activity. A capstone project report represents the application of knowledge as well as the search for it, and differs from a thesis such that student opinion and experience is involved. The student must negotiate capstone objectives, evaluation standards and any potential approvals prior to his or her practicum. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Department and continuous enrollment until competencies totaling 6 credit hours are completed. IND
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This is an elective course that allows students to pursue areas of special interest under the direction of a doctoral faculty member of his or her choice. This course is designed to support doctoral training. Academic options range from research based studies and/or activities to critical analysis of clinical practice methods. Students will complete special projects relevant to their designated practice area of interest. Students must negotiate learning objectives, academic projects and evaluation standards with their mentor. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of department. LEC RSH
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(1-6) An elective course to allow student investigation of special issues or problems relevant to applied research and/or practice, under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Systematic coverage of current issues may include a research investigation or study related to pertinent sociocultural trends, practice factors, or emerging issues in service provision. Students will complete special projects such as oral presentations, written papers, or case analysis as negotiate with the faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment as a non-degree seeking student and permission of the instructor. IND
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With an emphasis on leadership skills and professionalism, this course will include mentoring, supervising, managing, organizing presentations, and teaching, writing, and contributing through professional organizations (interdisciplinary and occupational therapy). Students professionalism on issues of concern to administrators, staff therapists, educators, or those in private practice. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC
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Students will identify and explore the key theories in occupational therapy and those more specific to their emphasis area with an emphasis on those currently influencing clinical reasoning. Students will demonstrate an understanding of contemporary theories and be able to compare and contrast key theories. Students will develop rationales for theory guided interventions. Furthermore, they will develop an impact summary in their identified area of emphasis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC
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Issues and trends relative to advanced application of theory, assessment and intervention with emphasis on pediatrics will be presented in lecture and discussion. Special projects will emphasize the student's special interests. Although faculty directed, student presentation will be emphasized. LEC
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An elective course to allow student investigation of special issues or problems relevant to applied research and/or practice, under the direction of a faculty member chosen by the student. Systematic coverage of current issues may include a research investigation or study related to pertinent sociocultural trends, practice factors, or emerging issues in service provision. Students will complete special projects such as oral presentations, written papers, or case analyses as negotiate with the faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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A proseminar conducted by the core graduate faculty in Occupational Therapy and Therapeutic Science. Twice-monthly meeting will involve student and faculty presentations of their current research, as well as provide more opportunities to obtain feedback on research proposals. May be taken more than once for a total of fours credits. (Same as TS 800.) RSH
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The course will address the major functions of the systems within the central nervous system and how they interact to produce responses to environmental demands. Sensory input, central processing, and output mechanisms will be analyzed. The student will then appraise human behavior in relation to function and dysfunction of the nervous system, both in formulating potential behavioral signs when a specific neurological site is presented, and in hypothesizing about neurological involvement when analyzing a particular individuals problems. Prerequisite: Undergraduate neuroscience course or permission of instructor. LEC
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This on-line course examines selected research studies, analysis methods and results employed, and applies research findings to practical problems. Students will design their own research project reflecting their area of interest. RSH
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Students investigate an empirical question relevant to occupational therapy and write a literature review and a research proposal under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Pending approval of the proposal, the student will carry out initial phases of the project, including materials preparation and data collection. RSH
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Course requires data analyses, interpretation, and scholarly writing based on individual original research carried out under the guidance of the student's adviser. These activities, along with an oral presentation of research, must meet with approval of the student's advisory committee to complete thesis requirements. Prerequisite: OTMS 890. THE
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The pharmacology series covers the mechanisms by which drugs interact with living organisms. An integrative emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular basis of drug action with respect to modifying the pathophysiology of specific disease states. Topics in P&TX 630 include, general principles of cell biology, molecular biology, pharmacogenomics, immunology and principles of drug metabolism and disposition. Prerequisite: BIOL 646 or equivalent. LEC
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The pharmacology series covers the mechanisms by which drugs interact with living organisms. An integrative emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular basis of drug action with respect to modifying the pathophysiology of specific disease states. Topics in P&TX 631 include, hematology, cancer biology and therapeutics, immunopharmacology, infectious diseases and respiratory disease. Prerequisite: P&TX 630 and BIOL 400 or equivalent. LEC
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The pharmacology series covers the mechanisms by which drugs interact with living organisms. An integrative emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular basis of drug action with respect to modifying the pathophysiology of specific disease states. Topics in P&TX 632 include, cardiovascular diseases, diuretics, autonomic pharmacology and drugs regulating central nervous system function. Prerequisite: P&TX 630 and P&TX 631. LEC
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The pharmacology series covers the mechanisms by which drugs interact with living organisms. An integrative emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular basis of drug action with respect to modifying the pathophysiology of specific disease states. Topics in P&TX 633 include endocrine disorders, diabetes and obesity, and gastrointestinal pharmacology. Prerequisite: P&TX 630, P&TX 631 and P&TX 632. LEC
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General principles of toxicology, treatment, and management of accidental poisoning, and current topics of interest. Prerequisite: P&TX 630, P&TX 631, and P&TX 632. LEC
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Students will read about and discuss the latest research on new antibiotic targets, therapeutic potential, disease prevention, and the emergence of antibiotic resistance. LEC
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The objective of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to read, examine, and report on a broad array of topics relevant to diabetes and obesity. Students will be given broad latitude to propose topics of interest to them within the area of diabetes and obesity. The format of the course will be group presentations. Groups of 3 students will identify a topic of interest to them in the field of diabetes and obesity, prepare a 30 min presentation and deliver it to the class for discussion. Prerequisite: P&TX 630. LEC
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Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, are associated with older age and/or enhanced oxidative stress. The possible causes for the development and progression of these diseases with relation to current research in the field will be discussed. Additionally, a summary of available and suggested future treatments will be given. Prerequisite: P&TX 630. LEC
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Several addictions will be discussed including addictions to alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, gambling, and others as time permits. The physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology and available treatments for these addictions will be reviewed. The role of pharmacotherapies will be discussed, particularly as they relate to the molecular basis of addiction. Behavioral and psychological approaches also will be examined. Prerequisite: Completion of P&TX 632 or special permission from faculty. LEC
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Original research on a laboratory problem of limited scope. This course cannot count toward pharmacology and toxicology requirements in the School of Pharmacy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Original library review of a limited special topic in pharmacology and toxicology. The student will write a review in his or her report. This course may count toward pharmacology and toxicology requirements in the School of Pharmacy. Prerequisite: P&TX 635 and consent of instructor. IND
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A course designed to assist doctoral students in the biomedical sciences in their professional development by providing presentations, discussions, and practical experiences related to career planning. Topics include diverse career opportunities and expectations of each, preparation of vitae/resumes and other elements of a successful job search, writing scientific papers and dealing with editors, developing programmatic research programs, balancing professional obligations, advancing through promotions, and related topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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This course will examine the bases for reciprocal dynamic interactions between central nervous system function and structure ("nature") and experience ("nurture"). "Nature" will be explored using principles and methodologies derived from systems and molecular pharmacology, and neurochemistry. The effects of "nurture" on brain will involve issues derived from behavioral pharmacology, environmental enrichment, and human brain imaging. During the course, with the help of the instructor, students will be expected to discuss and critically analyze research articles for subsequent presentation to the class. LEC
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The use of the library as a research tool and the study of bibliographic techniques of literature searching. Emphasis on pharmacological, physiological, biochemical, and medical literature. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of autonomic nervous system, central nervous system, and their pharmacology. The student will attend P&TX 632 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussions of advanced material on the topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of cardiovascular system, renal system and their pharmacology. The student will attend P&TX 632 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussions of advanced material on the topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of hematology, cancer biology and their pharmacology. The student will attend P&TX 631 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussions of advanced material on the topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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A detailed study of the fundamentals of infectious diseases, respiratory diseases and their pharmacology. The student will attend P&TX 631 lectures and meet separately with the faculty for additional discussions of advanced material on the topics. The students will be examined on the advanced material. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in pharmacology and toxicology. LEC
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