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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Designed to aid non-music majors in developing the skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music and writing about music. Open only to junior and senior non-music majors. A student may receive credit for either MUSC 136 or MUSC 336, but not both. LEC
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A selected topic in music or an interdisciplinary topic in the fine arts. The course may be repeated for credit when topic varies. Open only to non-music majors. LEC
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The course may be repeated for credit when topic varies. Open only to music majors. Prerequisite: MUSC 320 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Addresses music as a social and cultural phenomenon shaping broader patterns of human activity. It examines the ideas, behaviors and beliefs people have about their music based on selected case studies of traditional and popular music from North America, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The main goal of this course is to understand why people from different parts of the world do music the way they do. LEC
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Western Music from 1400 to 1750. Prerequisite: MUSC 320. LEC
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed study of primary sources. Prerequisite: A grade of "A" or "B" in MUSC 298, or equivalent, and permission of instructor. IND
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Western Music from 1750 to 1900. Prerequisite: MUSC 340. LEC
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Western music since 1900, classical and vernacular. Prerequisite: MUSC 440. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music from about 500 to 1400. Prerequisite: MUSC 320. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music from about 1400 to 1600. Prerequisite: MUSC 340. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music from about 1600 1750. Prerequisite: MUSC 340 and MUSC 440. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music from about 1750 to 1815. Prerequisite: MUSC 440. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music from about 1815 to 1900. Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480. LEC
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A concentrated survey of Western music during the twentieth century. Prerequisite: MUSC 480. LEC
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A concentrated survey of music in the United States. Prerequisite: One course in the field of musicology or permission of the instructor. LEC
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A concentrated survey of the history of opera. Prerequisite: MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480. LEC
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A concentrated survey of the history of chamber music. Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480. LEC
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A concentrated survey of the history of the concerto. Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480. LEC
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A concentrated survey of the history of the symphony. Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480. LEC
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A chronological survey of the development of the wind band/ensemble and its music, using standard musical works from each historical period. Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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A historical survey of music theory, both practical and speculative, from the ancient Greeks to the late twentieth century. Prerequisite: MUSC 240, MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480. LEC
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Prerequisite: Minimum average of B in MUSC 320, MUSC 340, MUSC 440, MUSC 480 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. IND
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An original research project that will result in a scholarly paper of moderate size. May be repeated once for credit. IND
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An introduction to music as part of the cultural experience in India, Southeast Asia, the Orient, and Africa, with comparisons to Western traditions and influences on contemporary music. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 320, MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480 or permission of instructor. LEC
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May be repeated for credit. (Same as CHOR 654.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. ACT
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed readings using primary schorlarly sources. Prerequisite: MTHC 410 and consent of instructor. LEC
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May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. ACT
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed study of primary resources. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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Prerequisite: MUSC 320. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340 and MUSC 440. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 440. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 480. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340 or MUSC 440 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of historical developments from the Pilgrims to the present. (Same as AMS 737.) Prerequisite: One course in the field of music history or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340 and MUSC 440, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 440 and MUSC 480, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A chronological survey of the development of the wind band/ensemble and its music, using standard musical works from each historical period. Prerequisite: MUSC 440, MUSC 480, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480. LEC
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Prerequisite: MUSC 340, MUSC 440, and MUSC 480. LEC
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A historical survey of music theory, both practical and speculative, from the ancient Greeks to the late twentieth century. (Same as MTHC 778.) LEC
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed reading of primary literary sources. Prerequisite: A grade average of "B" in two musicology courses numbered 500 or above and consent of instructor. IND
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Bibliography, research methods, and scholarly writing in music for entering graduate students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Advanced bibliography and writing of research papers. Prerequisite: MUSC 801. LEC
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A research course designed primarily for doctoral students in musicology. Prerequisite: MUSC 801, or its equivalent. LEC
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Primary and secondary sources in performance practices dealing mainly with the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, with implications applicable to student's performance medium. LEC
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Each semester a topic (to be inserted in the blank) will be the basis for discussion, reports, and a research paper. May be repeated for credit provided no course duplication takes place. LEC
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, BIOL 785, GEOL 783, and HIST 728.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, BIOL 788, GEOL 782, and HIST 720.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Presentation of principles and practices of exhibit management, design, and production. Topics will include developing a master plan for museum exhibits; concept development; design, installation, and maintenance of exhibits; design theory; design process; label writing and editing; selection of materials architectural requirements and building codes; cost estimating; publicity; security; and exhibit evaluation. Consideration will be given to exhibition problems in public and private museums in the areas of anthropology, art, history, natural history, and technology. (Same as AMS 700, BIOL 787, GEOL 781, and HIST 723.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, GEOL 785, and HIST 725.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, GEOL 784, and HIST 721.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, BIOL 700, GEOL 780, and HIST 722.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Study of the principles and practices applicable to the preservation, care, and administration of archives and manuscripts. Practical experience will be an integral part of this course. (Same as HIST 727.) LEC
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Seminar course to provide students with a working knowledge of the primary issues and current trends in building, administration, and care of scientific collections. Topics include permits, collecting, accessioning, cataloging, preservation, preventive conservation, and access to collections and data. The course format consists of readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussions, and visits to scientific collections on campus. (Same as BIOL 706.) LEC
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Advanced courses on special topics in museum studies, given as need arises. Lectures, discussions of readings, and guest speakers. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Museum Studies Program or permission of instructor. LEC
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In-depth examination of specific topics currently of concern to museums and museum professionals. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Museum Studies Program, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Individual research in a specialized topic not ordinarily treated in a Museum Studies core course for which there is a member of the graduate faculty competent and willing to direct a research project. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Directed reading in an area of Museum Studies in which there is no particular course in the Museum Studies program or in cooperating departments but in which there is a member of the graduate faculty competent and willing to direct a program study. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection, care, and management, public education, and exhibits with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, and HIST 799.) FLD
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Preservation and collection conservation theory and principles, including condition reporting, conservation of furniture and wooden objects, inorganic-based materials, metal objects, organic-based materials, paintings, photographic materials, textiles, three-dimensional objects, and works on paper. LEC
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Theory and principles of preventive conservation, with emphasis on its application to storage environment quality, archival supports and housings, basic bookbinding, composite objects, integrated pest management, light and lighting, paper evaluation and mending, temperature, and relative humidity. LEC
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Understanding the conservator-curator relationship; principles of conservation assessment, documentation, conservation research, environmental monitoring, handling objects, photographic documentation, and development of a publishable preservation research project. LEC
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Application of conservation theory and practice to exhibition development, planning, and preparation; conservation bookbinding; health and safety in conservation; integrated pest management; ethics of conservation; parameters of professional conservation practice. LEC
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Designed for and required annually of all NROTC midshipmen, to provide increased knowledge in the areas of warfare techniques, history, operations, and operational decision making. Applies knowledge learned from other accredited naval science courses. Highly educated, well known, professional guest lecturers appear frequently and make presentations on topics which apply to naval science courses, increase the educational awareness of future Navy and Marine Corps officers, and further develop the leadership and decision making of the officer candidates. Some close order drill and lectures on standard naval topics. Approved for credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1975. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LAB
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An introduction to the Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps) emphasizing its mission, organization, operation, and relationship to other U.S. federal and military institutions. Through historical overview, the development of the current Department of the Navy mission, organization and operation, both at sea and ashore, including customs, traditions, regulations, and professional\technical vocabulary is examined. Educational opportunities and specializations for naval officers are also detailed. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective spring 1982. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC
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A course designed to familiarize students with the types, structures, and purpose of naval ships. Ship compartmentation, propulsion systems, auxiliary power systems, electrical systems, interior communications, and control are included. Elements of ship design to achieve safe operations, damage control, and ship stability characteristics are examined. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as ENGR 180.) LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as ENGR 184.) Prerequisite: MATH 002. LEC
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A survey of United States naval history from the American Revolution to the present with emphasis on major developments. Included is an in-depth discussion of the geopolitical theory of Mahan. The course also treats present day concerns in seapower and maritime affairs including the economic and political issues of merchant marine commerce, the law of the sea, the Global War on terror, and a comparison of United States and foreign naval strategies. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1975. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC
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A comprehensive study of the theory, principles, and procedures of ship navigation in coastal and open ocean environment. Includes piloting, triangulation, ocean and tidal currents, International and U.S. inland rules of the road for navigation, sight reduction, publications, and logs; an introduction to electronic navigation, including theory of wave propagation, hyperbolic and azimuthal systems, doppler, inertial, and satellite systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as ENGR 301.) LEC
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A study of the laws for the prevention of collisions at sea; tactical formations and dispositions, relative motion, and the maneuvering board. A portion of the semester is devoted to an analysis of naval operations utilizing formal decision making theory, particularly as applied to command and control. Numerous case studies are used to examine the application of the above topics. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as ENGR 305.) Prerequisite: MATH 111 or higher. LEC
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An introduction of management functions as they apply to routine daily military activities. The concepts of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling, and coordinating are introduced and examined using lecture, seminar, and case study methods. The course includes discussions on responsibility and accountability, power and influence, managerial theories, decision making, personnel appraisal, organizational structure, and communications. Emphasis is placed on management of personnel and physical resources. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1975. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC
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A study of military leadership and management which investigates techniques and concepts of task accomplishment in the absence of a normative business environment. The course includes an examination of military law, ethical leadership, personal responsibility, authority, and bureaucracy. The focus of discussion is on those aspects of leadership and management not normally present in civilian enterprise such as operating in the presence of hostility and morale management. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1975. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. LEC
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An introductory overview of the field of nuclear medicine technology with includes medical terminology for clinical nuclear medicine, patient and nursing skills including phlebotomy and vital signs, departmental organization and function, and a basic overview of applied mathematical and statistical analysis used in clinical nuclear medicine. This course will also introduce to the imaging profession the legal aspects to patient care regarding patient rights, ethical theories, risk management, quality patient care. The student will participate in group discussion. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program LEC
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This course is designed to present the theories of nuclear chemistry and physics including theory of Bohr's atom, radiation production, decay, physical half life and interaction with matter, chemical reactions and equations, review of periodic chart of elements and trilinear chart of nuclides. Prerequisite: College Physics and College Chemistry along with acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program LEC
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This course is designed to present the aspects of radiopharmaceuticals including safety and handling, methods of localization, pharmacology, dose calculation and record keeping, methods of production, and quality control. The course will begin to identify the clinical uses of radiopharmaceuticals as this course will be a prerequisite for Radiopharmacy II. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program LEC
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This course is taught in modules corresponding to organ systems of the body. This course provides instruction in Skeletal, Liver and Spleen, Hepatobiliary and Respiratory systems. Each module includes: review of anatomy and physiology, cross-sectional anatomy, clinical indications for nuclear imaging, nuclear imaging procedures including radiopharmaceuticals for current clinical practices, image interpretation and review. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program. LEC
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This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the effects of radiation on the human body at the cellular, organ and whole body levels including late of effects of radiation exposure and the risk to benefits ratio. This course will provide the students with current federal and state regulations in regards to safe handling, disposal, record keeping, and licensing for the clinical use of radiation. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program LEC
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Through supervised learning situations in a clinical nuclear medicine imaging department the student will gain knowledge and be required to demonstrate competence in specific imaging of nuclear medicine procedures, radiopharmaceutical distribution, imaging instrumentation, patient safety, occupational safety, and quality control practices in the clinical setting. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program CLN
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This course is designed to familiarize the students with basic non-imaging and imaging with nuclear medicine equipment in the clinic. This course will include basic principles of operation, system configuration and performance characteristics of Scintillation cameras and PET systems, computers and quality control and assurance as required by manufacturer and regulatory agencies. It will introduce the student to various types of medical information systems and their uses in the medical imaging. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program LEC
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This course is the advanced course to Radiopharmacy I. The students will have an understanding of the radiopharmaceuticals that are used in the clinical nuclear medicine department. This course will also cover monoclonal, polyclonal, peptides, PET, therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, pharmacology, as well as advancement in research that is current on radiopharmaceuticals to be used in the nuclear clinical setting. Prerequisite: Radiopharmacy I LEC
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This course is taught in modules corresponding to organ systems of the body. This course provides instruction in Genito-Urinary, Endocrine, EKG, Nuclear Cardiology, Infection/Tumor, Gastro-Intestinal, Neurology, PET, CT, Miscellaneous procedures, and Non-Imaging In-Vivo. Each module includes: review of anatomy and physiology, cross-sectional anatomy, clinical indications for nuclear imaging, nuclear imaging procedures including radiopharmaceuticals for current clinical practices, image interpretation and review. Prerequisite: Clinical Procedures I. LEC
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Through supervised learning situations in a clinical nuclear medicine imaging department the student will gain knowledge and be required to demonstrate competence in specific imaging of nuclear medicine procedures, radiopharmaceutical distribution, imaging instrumentation, patient safety, occupational safety, and quality control practices in the clinical setting. Prerequisite: Clinical Internship I CLN
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This course is designed to familiarize the student in research methodology and advances in nuclear medicine for future developments. This course will also demonstrate the phases of research and research different divisions of the research cycle. The second portion of the class will familiarize the student with the administration techniques of health management. Health management will include billing, coding and budget and equipment selection processes of maintaining a nuclear medicine department. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Training Program. LEC
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This course is designed to prepare the student for national boards in the filed of nuclear medicine technology. The student will be responsible for in class review of nuclear clinical procedures, nuclear instrumentation and quality assurance, radiopharmacy, radiation protection and patient care. Students will be required to attend guest lectures and video conferences. Prerequisite: Clinical Procedures I and II, Radiopharmacy I and II, Nuclear Instrumentation and Quality Assurance, Radiation Biology and Protection and Introduction to Nuclear Medicine LEC
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Through supervised learning situations in a clinical nuclear medicine imaging department the student will gain knowledge and be required to demonstrate competence in specific imaging of nuclear medicine procedures, radiopharmaceutical distribution, imaging instrumentation, patient safety, occupational safety, and quality control practices in the clinical setting. Prerequisite: Clinical Internship II CLN
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Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking, reading, and writing Norwegian. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Norwegian. LEC
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Continuation of grammar; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Norwegian. Prerequisite: NORW 104 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of NORW 108. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation with readings of literary and cultural texts. Not open to native speakers of Norwegian. Prerequisite: NORW 108 or permission of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of NORW 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation with readings of literary and cultural texts. Not open to native speakers of Norwegian. Prerequisite: NORW 212 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Health theory, research and nursing practice specific to the family as a system of health care delivery are discussed. Issues of patient and family autonomy, advocacy and alliances with health care professionals are explored in relation to professional values. Health and functioning of clients and family caregivers are assessed in their environment considering economic, social, and cultural factors. Students may elect a 1 credit clinical practicum to implement nursing care with caregiving families. LEC
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