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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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In many industries, the sales force is the primary vehicle for taking the product to market. The main objective of this course is to expose students to the concepts, tools, and techniques required to effectively manage this important function. Since the use of personal selling is generally more pronounced within industrial markets, this course will first analyze issues unique to industrial marketing. Topics here include industrial buying behavior, segmentation strategies for industrial markets, life cycle strategies, and managing the pricing function for industrial products. Using this foundation, the next part of the course will cover issues specific to the management of the sales force such as structuring the sales force, sizing the sales force, demand estimation, quota setting, and sales force compensation. Finally, the last part of the course will focus on skills required for professional selling such as handling objections and closing the sales call. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 425. LEC
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The internet and digital technologies continue to profoundly impact all aspects of the marketing function. The broad objectives of this course are to better understand how digital technologies create value for customers and profits for companies. Special emphasis will be placed on new opportunities afforded by digital technologies. Specific topics include personalization, closed-loop marketing, online communities, new pricing formats, harnessing dispersed competence, and formulating win-win marketing strategies. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 450. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In this course, students are first exposed to the various viewpoints that govern pricing. After introducing pricing as an integral part of the marketing decision process, the course will develop an appreciation of the various tools (for example, consumer behavior and game theory) used to arrive at competitive pricing strategies. Cases will be used to illustrate both the tools and resulting strategies. Illustrative topics include: Value-based pricing, price matching guarantees, predatory pricing, behavioral pricing, interaction of pricing with channel decisions, bundling, and online auctions. While using various methods, care will be taken to differentiate long-term strategies and short-term tactics used by firms. Overall, students will be able to create effective pricing strategies and also understand how pricing policy fits into the overall marketing function of the organization. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 455. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Unique characteristics associated with services (e.g., intangibility, perishability, and real-time production) necessitate use of a different set of concepts, methods, and frameworks for their effective management. This broad course is designed to fill the knowledge-gap between managing products and managing services. Sample topics covered in this course include managing customer expectations, customer satisfaction measurement, managing service demand, mobilizing people for breakthrough service, managing service recovery, relationship marketing, customer lifetime value analysis, and managing services in a global context. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 445. Prerequisite: MKTG 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and practical implementation of customer relationship management (CRM) strategies using marketing databases. Topics include: fundamentals of CRM strategy, RFM analysis, LTV metrics, logit models, decision tress, techniques for evaluating model performance (e.g., lift charts, ROC) and applications to campaign management. In keeping with the hands-on nature of the course, students will be instructed on how to implement the CRM techniques using various software tools. Not open to students with credit in MKTG 465/SCM 425. Prerequisite: MKTG 704. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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(V) Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course deals with measurement tools typically used in marketing such as conjoint analysis, multi-dimensional scaling, questionnaire construction, formative and causal indicators of constructs, scale development and testing, reliability and validity issues, and design of complex lab and field experiments. The goal of the course is to equip students with measurement tools to conduct research in academic and applied settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar provides an overview of the current theories and methodological approaches associated with consumer behavior research. Main topics of the course include attention and information search, consumer memory structure, consumer knowledge, inference making, motivation/goal, consumer attitude and persuasion, judgment and decision making, self-perception and regulation, culture's influence on consumer behavior, and affect/emotion/mood. The content will be based on literature from multiple disciplines including marketing, psychology, sociology, and economics. Students will be required to critically analyze and synthesize the literature, with a view to formulate research proposals on issues that interest them. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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The primary objective of this course is to gain an appreciation for modeling marketing phenomena from a decision support perspective. Emphasis will be placed on reviewing a broad range of topics, with a view to understanding the model building process across a wide variety of contexts. In addition, although marketing models include both verbal models and mathematical models, the emphasis will primarily be on the latter. Illustrative research questions analyzed include: How should a firm design incentives for salespeople? Should a firm sell its products individually or in bundles? How can promotions be designed to increase retail pass through? Does it pay to be first to market? Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on fundamentals of marketing communications with a heavy emphasis on message-memory. Some of the topics covered in this course include memory structures and measures, resistance to persuasion, alignability and comparative advertising, mere exposure effects, effect of syntactic complexity on message effectiveness, working memory deficits and multimedia presentations, memory interference and brand dilution, resistance to persuasion, mood and memory, adjunct questions and memory for print messages, communicating with audiences with working memory deficits (e.g., elderly adults), and communicating with bilingual consumers. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This seminar exposes students to the various analytical approaches to understand and model pricing phenomena by examining the classic as well as contemporary works on pricing. The students will learn how to model strategic interactions in the marketplace using game theory and other analytical tools as well as theories such as auction theory, prospect theory, and mental accounting. Some of the topics covered in this course include price discrimination mechanisms, price as a competitive tool (e.g., entry deterrence), price as a promotional strategy, role of price in channel structure and strategy, and effect of price on consumer choice. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course focuses on understanding products and the product development process. Readings are drawn from the literature in marketing, management, decision theory and psychology. Some topics covered in the course include creation and diffusion of innovations, modeling consumers' perceptions and preferences, brand equity and branding, entry order, sales forecasting, and global product development. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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The first semester of Elementary Mongolian is designed to give the student basic communicative competency, including pronunciation and intonation, structure, and syntax. Effective oral and written communication is stressed. LEC
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A continuation of Elementary Mongolian I. Prerequisite: Elementary Mongolian I or the equivalent. LEC
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An intensive study of music fundamentals. Open to music majors only. LEC
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The first semester of an integrated two-year theory sequence that examines the harmonic, melodic, rhythmic, and formal organization of music while developing critical listening and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: Music major or consent of instructor. LEC
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The second semester of an integrated two-year theory sequence that examines the harmonic, rhythmic, and formal organization of music while developing critical listening and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: MTHC 105. LEC
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An introductory course for non-music majors, emphasizing western art and vernacular styles of music. Students will participate in and interact with various parameters of music through the acquisition of basic musical skills. For freshmen and sophomores. LEC
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The third semester of an integrated two-year theory sequence that examines the harmonic, melodic, rhythmic, and formal organization of music while developing critical listening and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: MTHC 115. LEC
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For music theory and composition majors. Creative writing using basic concepts in harmony, melody, and form. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MTHC 115. IND
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The fourth semester of an integrated two-year theory sequence that examines the harmonic, melodic, rhythmic, and formal organization of music while developing critical listening and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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A study of musical forms from the common practice period through the present day and analytical techniques for post-tonal music. The class is designed for music education and music therapy majors. Prerequisite: MTHC 205, music education, or music therapy major. LEC
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An introductory course for non-music majors, emphasizing western art and vernacular styles of music. Students will participate in and interact with various parameters of music through the acquisition of basic musical skills. For juniors and seniors. LEC
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed readings using primary scholarly sources. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of harmonic principles with emphasis on nineteenth and early twentieth century materials. For graduate students deficient in undergraduate harmonic theory. LEC
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Development of aural and sight-reading skills using materials related to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. For graduate students deficient in undergraduate aural theory. LEC
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Basis concepts. Structural analysis of binary, ternary, rondo, sonata-allegro, variations, and contrapuntal forms. Multi-movement forms. Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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Introductory course in the sequence, presenting the basic tools of post-tonal and 20th century composition, including, serial techniques, set theory, extended tertian harmony, minimalist techniques, contemporary tonality and other trends. Exploration of form and complex rhythmic structures as well as aural skills appropriate to the subject matter. Prerequisite: MTHC 315. LEC
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Analysis seminar, emphasizing intense study of larger contemporary works, using techniques learned in the first course (MTHC 732). Further content will vary according to the instructor. Includes aural skills work appropriate to the subject matter. Prerequisite: MTHC 432. LEC
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Primary voicings and textural possibilities for wind and percussion instruments will be stressed as these resources relate to the arranging of music for marching and pep bands at the secondary level. (Same as BAND 459.) Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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For music majors interested in learning to write for primary and secondary educational performing groups. Emphasizes conventional tonal practices and idiomatic, accessible writing for young players. Prerequisite: MTHC 205, MTHC 484, and MTHC 459. IND
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Composition recital for undergraduate music composition majors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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For seniors majoring in music theory who will normally enroll for two credits in each of the last two semesters. Students will write a scholarly paper on an approved topic. IND
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A study of eighteenth century style with analysis and original work. Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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A study of sixteenth-century style with analysis and original work. Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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Curriculum includes idiomatic writing, tonal balance, scoring for large percussion sections, and analysis of wind colors and instrumental combinations found in music of Holst, Vaughan Williams, Grainger, Stravinsky, Hindemith, and C. Williams. (Same as BAND 559.) Prerequisite: MTHC 205 and MTHC 459. IND
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Advanced composition including larger forms in a variety of media. Composition majors will present a public recital of original works during the fourth semester of enrollment. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MTHC 253 or consent of instructor. IND
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Basic concepts. Structural analysis of binary, ternary, rondo, sonata-allegro, variations and contrapuntal forms. Multi-movement forms. LEC
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Investigation of a subject by means of directed readings of primary scholarly sources. Prerequisite: MTHC 410 and consent of instructor. IND
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Composing and arranging for voice, including solo voice, choral and operatic settings. Prerequisite: Six hours of MTHC 253 and MTHC 541 and consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the four families of orchestral instruments (woodwinds, brass, percussion, and strings) concentrating on ranges, transpositions, timbres, and techniques of the various instruments. Scoring projects concentrate on voicing and balance within the individual choirs of the orchestra. Prerequisite: MTHC 205. LEC
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A continuation of MTHC 674. Emphasis on scoring for full symphony orchestra and the large wind ensemble. Prerequisite: MTHC 674. LEC
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Survey of concepts and practices of electronic sound synthesis. Required of music theory and composition majors, and open to other music majors by consent of department. Prerequisite: MTHC 315 or MTHC 316. LEC
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Basic concepts and techniques of electronic composition. For majors in music theory and composition. Prerequisite: MTHC 678 and consent of division. LEC
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Introductory course in the sequence, presenting the basic tools of post-tonal and 20th century composition, including, serial techniques, set theory, extended tertian harmony, minimalist techniques, contemporary tonality and other trends. Exploration of form and complex rhythmic structures as well as aural skills appropriate to the subject matter. Prerequisite: MTHC 315 or MTHC 316. LEC
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Analytical seminar, emphasizing intense study of larger contemporary works, using techniques learned in the first course (MTHC 732). Further content will vary according to the instructor. Includes aural skills work appropriate to the subject matter. Prerequisite: MTHC 732. LEC
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A study of strict imitation and fugal writing. Practical work in two, three, and four parts in various media. Prerequisite: MTHC 541. LEC
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A historical survey of music theory, both practical and speculative, from the ancient Greeks to the late twentieth century. (Same as MUSC 778.) LEC
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Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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A survey of the principal theories of musical analysis, including Schenkerian analysis, set theory, serial theory, and semiology. Prerequisite: MTHC 510 or an equivalent course in musical forms. LEC
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An investigation of formal types, processes and functions in the instrumental tonal music of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of the theories and analytical methodologies developed by the Austrian theorist Heinrich Schenker. Prerequisite: MTHC 410 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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A seminar designed to develop and explore the use and programming of microcomputers as an aid in research and the production of music. Topics will include composition and production tools for music, structured program design, data representation, and basic computer-assisted instruction models. Prerequisite: EECS 138 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Procedures for teaching theoretical concepts and skills. Survey of available texts and related materials. Three credits when offered during a full academic term; one-two credits when offered as a short-term institute. Prerequisite: MTHC 315 or MTHC 316 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Essentially for theory and composition majors on the master's level. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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Prerequisite: MTHC 676, or consent of department. May be repeated for credit. RSH
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Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Essentially for theory and composition majors on the doctoral level. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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This is an all-purpose fill in the blank course for freshmen and sophomores. It can be used when need arises. IND
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A study of concert and recital music as it relates to the performer and listener. Students will have interaction with professional musicians through live performances and discussions with the performers. Music performed on the concert and chamber music series and on concerts of music department faculty will be carefully examined. Baroque through modern music, jazz, and music of other cultures are the basic units in the course. Written research projects and reviews of performances are required. LEC
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A team-taught, performance-based survey for wind and string students of musical styles from the Baroque to present. Students will examine music from their perspective literature from several different perspectives including: historical, theoretical, technical, and expressive. The integration of these perspectives into the students' performance is the ultimate goal of the course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of applied instrumental instructor. IND
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This is an all-purpose fill in the blank course for juniors and seniors. It can be used when need arises. IND
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A study of concert and recital music as it relates to the performer and listener. Students will have interaction with professional musicians through live performances and discussions with the performers. Music performed on the concert and chamber music series and on concerts of music department faculty will be carefully examined. Baroque through modern music, jazz, and music of other cultures are the basic units in the course. Written research projects and reviews of performances are required. LEC
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A team-taught, performance-based survey for wind and string students of musical styles from the Baroque to present. Students will examine music from their perspective literature from several different perspectives including: historical, theoretical, technical, and expressive. The integration of these perspectives into the students' performance is the ultimate goal of the course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Approval of applied instrumental instructor. IND
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A course covering commercial aspects of the music business, including publishing, copyright law, recording, live performance, the motion picture and radio business, composition, teaching, and music merchandising. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. LEC
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Considerations involved in booking, scheduling, and presenting music, theatre, and dance events. Locating and selecting artists, reading and negotiating contracts, fund raising, grant writing, working with support groups, marketing techniques, publicity, personnel, and finance management. LEC
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A study and analysis of music from the turn of the century to World War II. For non-music majors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A study and analysis of music from World War II to the present. For non-music majors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This is an all-purpose fill in the blank course for graduate students. It can be used when need arises. LEC
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Honors version of MUSC 136/MUSC 336. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Designed to aid non-music majors in developing skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music. A student may receive credit for only one of the four courses numbers: MUSC 135, MUSC 335, MUSC 136, MUSC 336. LEC
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Designed to aid non-music majors in developing the skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music. Open only to freshman and sophomore non-music majors. A student may receive credit in either MUSC 136 or MUSC 336, but not both. LEC
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Addresses music as a social and cultural phenomenon shaping broader patterns of human activity. It examines the ideas, behaviors and beliefs people have about their music based on selected case studies of traditional and popular music from North America, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The main goal of this course is to understand why people from different parts of the world do music the way they do. LEC
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May be repeated for credit. (Same as CHOR 254.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. ACT
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May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. ACT
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A survey of the history of jazz from its beginnings in the early twentieth century to the present. Open to music and non-music majors. LEC
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A survey of the American popular song in the twentieth century, with an emphasis on the composer's lyricists, and performers who made them popular. LEC
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A detailed study of the major styles of jazz that developed between 1920 and 1980, with an emphasis on aural recognition of their characteristics. LEC
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A detailed study of the most innovative and influential figures in the history of jazz. LEC
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A survey of the Broadway Musical from the early twentieth century to the present. LEC
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A survey of the film musical from the 1920s through the 1980s. LEC
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Designed for non-music majors, the course surveys the geographical and ethnographical sources of the many forms of music in Latin America. The various forms of music will be examined from historical, cultural, and stylistic perspectives. LEC
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A survey of concert music in Europe and the United States in the twentieth century. Not open to music majors. LEC
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Survey of the many musical traditions of Black Africa and the Middle East, emphasizing their cultural and social context. Open to both majors and non-majors. LEC
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Survey of the history of rock and roll, starting with its origins in rhythm and blues and continuing to the present day. Open to both majors and non-majors. LEC
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A survey course for non-majors on the history of film music from silent films to the present. Students will use written texts, website materials such as streaming video and audio, and regular screening in an auditorium setting for assignments and papers. LEC
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This course examines the richness and diversity of African American music and its influence on the entire American musical landscape. Beginning with African retentions in African American music, the course will trace the history and development of both written and oral traditions from 1700 to the present day. LEC
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This course examines the history, culture, and musical traditions of the Andean region: Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Columbia, and Venezuela. It focuses on a selection of indigenous rituals and popular music of mestizo and African American origin. By the end of the semester students will be acquainted with particular genres, instruments, and the social contexts with which they are associated. LEC
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This course examines the history, culture, and musical traditions of Mexico and the Caribbean. It focuses on a selection of rituals and traditional and popular music of the region. By the end of the semester students will be acquainted with various musical genres, instruments, and the social contexts with which they are associated. LEC
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Introduction to world music; and Western music to 1400. Prerequisite: One year of music theory. LEC
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Honors version of MUSC 136/MUSC 336. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Designed to aid non-music majors in developing skills needed for listening to music. Emphasis on masterworks of Western music. A student may receive credit for only one of the four course numbers: MUSC 135, MUSC 335, MUSC 136, MUSC 336. LEC
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