Print...

Browse all courses

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
Show courses in
with a course number to
worth in .

There are 9,438 results.

This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as ANTH 379,.) LEC
View current sections...
Although approximately 600 indigenous languages are spoken by 30 million people in Latin America, public life is conducted in Spanish. The class provides a comprehensive survey of language issues in Latin America by analyzing the situation of minority language groups, language rights, language policies, and language planning, as well as by considering the questions that arise regarding bilingual education, literacy, and the role of minority languages in educational systems. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
View current sections...
The interdisciplinary focus of this class allows students to connect what they have learned about major issues in the field of Latin American Studies with a thematic focus of the professor's choosing. By the end of the class and culminating their study of the field at KU, they will be able to discuss these issues from a variety of theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary perspectives as demonstrated in the portfolio of written work maintained throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Completion of 3 courses at the 300 level and above with Latin American content in the Humanities and 3 at the 300 level and above in the Social Sciences (that is, at least 18 credits toward the major); or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study and research under faculty direction. Open to students wishing to graduate with honors in Latin American Studies and having a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Latin American Studies and at least 3.25 overall. Requires an interdisciplinary project concerning a specific topic involving at least two disciplines. Must be directed by a faculty member in Latin American Studies, approved by the Center Associate Director, and defended before a committee of at least three faculty members. To earn departmental honors, a student must take the course for two semesters (with a minimum grade of B the first semester, and an A the second). LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. IND
View current sections...
Examines the sociolinguistic issues of multilingual countries in Latin America from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include but are not limited to linguistic inequality, the language of politics, language and education, urban and rural linguistic interaction, and indigenous and creole languages. Prerequisite: A liberal arts course with Latin American content. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major narrative trends including Amerindian languages and the analysis of "indigenista" literature. The African substratum of Latin American culture and its relation to concepts such as "marvelous realism" is explored. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are investigated as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The influence of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on their emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores the relationship between political development and cultural phenomena of Latin America from 1800 to the present, with special emphasis on gender, popular culture, and ideology. The influences of 20th-century ideologies and technology on cultural development in Latin America will also be examined. LEC
View current sections...
This course follows the development of U.S. Latino and Latin American cinema from its origins to the present and its relationship with literary discourse. U.S. Latino/Latin American cinema can be seen as a specific practice that cannot be reduced in all its manifestations to the institutional mode of production of the dominant Hollywood model. The course examines the creation of a national cinema that seems to be more dependent on a literary canon. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are explored as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The impact of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on the emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 379 or LAA 334. LEC
View current sections...
This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as ANTH 665 and WGSS 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours coursework in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or Latin American Studies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of bibliographic and reference sources for research on Latin America in the humanities and social sciences. Designed to prepare students for library research at the seminar, thesis, or dissertation level. Prerequisite: Junior standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary seminar incorporating significant and pertinent materials from the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature. Required of all graduate students enrolled in the Master of Arts program in Latin American Area Studies. Prerequisite: LAA 700 (may be taken simultaneously with LAA 701 if both courses offered during same semester). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Brazil, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Brazilian Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Central America and Mexico, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Central America & Mexico Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Spanish. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation and research of interdisciplinary topics in Latin American Studies. RSH
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
View current sections...
An introduction to the Latin language. LEC
View current sections...
Integrates study of elementary Latin with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings. Prerequisite: LAT 104 or LAT 105, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings, integrated with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: LAT 105 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Attention to literary history and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 108 or LAT 109, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Exercises in literary analysis and/or prose composition. Prerequisite: LAT 109 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary interpretation and literary history. Prerequisite: LAT 112 or LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid with attention to literary history. Exercises in literary interpretation and verse composition. Prerequisite: LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Composition in Latin prose, stressing the basic principles of Latin syntax and style. Recommended for majors and minors. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Cicero, Seneca, Petronius, Pliny, and Apuleius, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and the satirists, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Caesar, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to issues in Roman history and historiography. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Sulpicia, Ovid, and Martial, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca, with attention to literary interpretation, theater history, and performance. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Readings in Latin literature, selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Latin literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
View current sections...
An examination of the grammar, syntax, and style of the Latin language through exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Ovid, Martial. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, Augustine. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Plautus, Terence, Horace, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius. LEC
View current sections...
Extensive reading in a variety of Latin authors. LEC
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Latin. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
An introduction to teaching required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants. Topics to include: pronunciation, etymology, Latin style, testing methods, and the selecting of texts. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Latin or equivalent. RSH
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. THE
View current sections...
This course will examine all phases of the litigation process in civil actions. Specific subjects covered may include: pleadings; discovery; disposition of cases without trial; the right to jury trial; post-trial motions; appeals; the bases for jurisdiction over persons and property; notice; venue; subject matter jurisdiction; choice of federal or state law in diversity cases; joinder of claims and parties; and preclusive effects of judgments. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the law of the United States Constitution, including the historical context and evolution of constitutional principles, methods of constitutional interpretation and analysis, and basic doctrine concerning the structure of government and the protection of individual rights. Doctrinal coverage includes separation of powers, federalism, equal protection, due process, and freedom of religion. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to contract law, including topics such as offer and acceptance, consideration, contracts enforceable without consideration, defenses to enforcement of contracts, terms of contracts and their interpretation, performance and breach of contracts, remedies for breach, third-party beneficiaries, and assignments. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to substantive criminal law, including theories of punishment, basic stages of the criminal process, culpability, defenses, parties to crime, conspiracy, attempts, sentencing, homicide, and other selected offenses. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces students to legal systems and the skills of lawyers. It includes instruction and discussion on legal traditions, legal institutions and legal methods. It focuses on developing students' skills in legal reasoning, writing and research. Students will complete numerous research and writing assignments, culminating in an open memorandum. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
In this course, students build on the research and writing skills they developed in the first semester and practice additional skills such as client interviewing, negotiation and mediation. Students learn about the expectations and demands of lawyers and the legal profession through instruction on bar admission, professionalism, and ethical advocacy, and by working on assignments in a simulated lawsuit. Student work culminates in an advocacy brief and subsequent oral argument. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to personal property law and to real property law, which includes adverse possession, estates in land, cotenancies, landlord-tenant law, easements, and real covenants, and which may include other private and public land use controls, eminent domain, and conveyancing. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
Fall semester. Development of liability based upon fault. Intentional torts, including battery, assault, false imprisonment, intentional infliction of mental distress, trespass to land and chattels, conversion, and privileges. Negligence, including standard of care, causation, limitation of duty, defenses, and comparative negligence. Survival and wrongful death. Strict liability. Damages. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
The workshop will expose students to the substantive and procedural law as well as the ethical rules pertaining to expert witness testimony. Moreover, it will provide a realistic courtroom setting where students will learn to conduct and defend a series of expert witness examinations and cross-examinations in a simulated environment under the direction and guidance of experienced attorneys who will serve as the workshop faculty. Workshop faculty will evaluate each student and provide immediate critical and helpful feedback to the students after each testimonial performance. It is anticipated that each student will conduct and defend a total of at least five (5) mini expert witness examinations and/or cross-examinations during a one credit-hour workshop or ten (10) in a two credit-hour workshop. LEC
View current sections...
This clinic serves the dual goals of providing students with practical research experience and assisting the Kansas Supreme Court by providing needed research support. Students are assigned research projects from the Kansas Supreme Court and the Office of Judicial Administration as arranged by the instructors. Students employ a variety of methodologies to conduct thorough research and concisely convey their findings to the Kansas Supreme Court, culminating with a presentation to the court at the end of the semester. FLD
View current sections...
This course will explore the role of law in contemporary Chinese society from a historical and comparative perspective. This course complements (but is independent of) Law 879. The focus of the course is on China's administrative and legal institutions and legal reform efforts since 1978, with some coverage of China's traditional legal order and the historical influences on China's legal institutions and attitudes toward law from the early twentieth century to the present. Specific topics in modern Chinese law will vary but may include contract, property, criminal, business, intellectual property, environmental, and labor law, wand human rights. Due to the volume of material we will cover in a limited time, the legal systems of Greater China (Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan) will not be covered in this course. No Chinese language skill is necessary for this course and not prior familiarity with China or East Asia is assumed. LEC
View current sections...
All 50 states have their own constitutions and cases interpreting those charters. State constitutions sometimes mirror or duplicate federal constitutional provisions, but state constitutions also contain provisions not found in the U.S. constitution. In our federal system, both federal and state constitution law are important and vibrant. This course explores the similarities and the differences in federal and state constitutional law. Coverage includes structural aspects of state constitutional law (dual sovereignty, interpreting state constitutions independently of the federal constitution, the organization of state government., restrictions unique to the state constitutions, and the amendment process, as well as individual rights under state constitutions (equality, due process, criminal procedure, property, religion education, "right to a remedy"/"open courts", and privacy). Prerequisite: Introduction to Constitutional Law. LEC
View current sections...
This course will explore the development of legal ideas about the legal regulation of armed conflict, with special attention given to the role and treatment of civilians and other non-combatants. It will not cover American military justice under the Uniform Code of Military Justice nor will it cover internal discipline of military forces. Among the subjects covered will be the history of attempts to legally regulate armed conflict, the law of war at sea, in the air, and in space, treatment of civilians by combatants, treatment of property, particularly significant cultural property by combatants, and non-military combatants, including pirates and terrorists. LEC
View current sections...
Students collaborate with the instructor on appeals before the Board of Immigration Appeals. Individual students, or teams of students, supervised by the Clinic Director, also prepare research reports in response to requests from lawyers and other policy makers. The clinic is designed to acquaint students with issues and procedures in immigration cases and to provide instruction in legal writing, research and analysis. Prerequisite: Immigration Law. LEC
View current sections...
This course deals with issues relating to a court's power to adjudicate claims. Topics covered may include jurisdiction over persons or property, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, determining the applicable law, joinder of parties, and recognition and enforcement of judgments. Prerequisite: Civil Procedure. Not open to students who have had the School's two-semester, six-hour course or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
This course seeks to provide a bridge between the appellate-style advocacy that is taught in the first-year, and the pre-trial and trial advocacy offered in the upper-level curriculum. The course is skills-based, designed to enhance students' advocacy skills by asking them to contemplate effective techniques in different contexts and with different audiences in mind. The course seeks to focus students on the methods and nuances of advocacy beyond the substance they are presenting. Because it is a skills-oreinted course, it requires extensive student presentation. Specifically, students will be asked to play the role of advocate in various contexts that litigators and trial lawyers often confront and will be required to respond to than critique others who advocate in those contexts. Prerequisite: Evidence. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an introduction to the complex procedures associated with civil litigation in an international context. Topics covered include personal and subject matter jurisdiction, venue considerations, transnational service of process, transnational discovery, choice of law, and recognition and enforcement of judgements. Litigation contexts discussed will include both commercial and human rights. Prerequisite: Jurisdiction or permission of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Fall semester. Explores legal relationships in tort and contract that may arise when one person represents another. Primary focus is on relationships between principal and third party, but includes coverage of agent's duties to principal and liability to third party. Enrollment limited to LL.M. students. LEC
View current sections...
Completion of a substantial research project on an elder law topic, under supervision as determined by the Director of the Elder Law LL.M. program. Enrollment may extend over more than one semester. RSH
View current sections...
The separation and delegation of powers. The development of administrative function. Administrative discretion, notice, hearing, jurisdiction, conclusiveness of determination, and judicial control. Examination of current problems in various administrative processes. LEC
View current sections...
Considers in depth a number of topics not covered or only briefly covered in first year contracts, which may include contract interpretation, third party beneficiaries, assignment and delegation, the overlap of contract and tort, and the enforceability of particular provisions. Commercial Law: Secured Transactions or Commercial Law: Payment Systems will be an asset. Prerequisite: Contracts. LEC
View current sections...
Detailed analysis of the formal criminal process from initial appearance through appeal. Emphasis on pretrial and trial proceedings. LEC
View current sections...
This course will focus on the regulation of financial institutions, including depository institutions (banks, thrifts and credit unions), securities broker-dealers, insurance companies and investment companies. Emphasis will be on the laws governing banks and their corporate families, including issues pertaining to corporate structure, capitalization, liquidity and business activities. LEC
View current sections...
Focuses on advanced legal research methodologies and sources related to a specific area of law. The area of law will be selected by the instructor and announced prior to enrollment, and could include environmental law, criminal law, tribal law, business law, intellectual property, or international law, among others. Depending on the area of law being covered, sources will include administrative materials, loose-leaf services, treatises, practice materials, association regulations, commercial databases, and the Internet. Students will prepare a research plan in a specific area of the law being covered. Each student will turn in research logs that document the steps taken to complete research problems. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the effect of the federal income tax on corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies, as well as their owners. Includes coverage of federal income tax provisions having especially important effects on business activities in general. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation and Business Associations I or Business Organizations. LEC
View current sections...
Spring semester. Evaluates important legal research tools and techniques not covered in the required first year Lawyering course. Provides an in-depth look at Kansas materials, legal reference books, form books, and computer-assisted research. Research aids in selected subject areas will also be examined. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced skills in the litigation process selected by the instructor, which may include negotiation, counseling, discovery techniques, advanced witness examination, expert witnesses, advanced jury selection techniques, alternative dispute resolution, arbitration, practice before administrative agencies, mediation, or other related topics. Course content will be promulgated by the instructor prior to the registration period for the semester in which the course is offered. This course may be taken more than once, provided the instructor determines there is no inappropriate duplication of other courses taken by the student. Prerequisite: Evidence, Trial Advocacy, and permission of instructor if an Advanced Litigation course has been taken. FLD
View current sections...
Considers the role of government in agriculture as well as traditional transaction issues such as leasing, the marketing and storing of commodities, special secured financing rules relating to agriculture credit, the impact of the bankruptcy of a warehouse (elevator) containing producers' stored commodities, and problems confronting the livestock industry. Other unique issues to be considered include genetically modified crops (GMOs) and the use of antibiotics by producers of livestock and poultry. Prerequisite/co-requisite: Commercial Law: Secured Transactions. LEC
View current sections...
This professional skills course will expose students to substantive and procedural law, as well as the ethical rules, pertaining to depositions. It provides students a realistic deposition setting in which they will learn to conduct and defend a series of depositions in a simulated environment under the direction of experienced attorneys who serve as the workshop faculty. Prerequisite: Evidence. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces the student to arbitration, mediation, negotiation, and other methods for resolving disputes. In addition to serving as alternatives to the court system, these processes also play an increasingly important role in litigation and settlement. This is a survey course, which may include exercises to develop skills such as interviewing, counseling, and negotiation. FLD
View current sections...
The course explores various types of nonqualified deferred compensation agreements used as supplements to, or substitutions for, retirement benefits available under qualified arrangements. Certain income tax, ERISA, accounting, corporate and securities laws issues will be addressed as they apply to bonus, employment, severance and stock-based compensation agreements. LEC
View current sections...
An introductory survey of the history of American Law and American legal institutions. LEC
View current sections...
Covers the Sherman Antitrust Act and related federal legislation designed to control the competitive practices and structure of American industries. Examines the law of monopolization, price fixing, group boycotts, vertical restraints such as tie-ins and distribution restrictions, and mergers. Some elementary principles of economic analysis are employed but economics is not a prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
This course treats contemporary issues in international trade practice and policy. Among the practical topics covered in detail are: (1) countervailing duties against unfair subsidies; (2) safeguard actions against fair foreign competition; (3) the protection of intellectual property rights against infringement; (4) trade in agriculture; and (5) trade in services. Among the policy topics emphasized, from both "our" and "their" perspective, are: (1) trade relations with Third World countries; (2) trade relations with Muslim countries; (3) the critical link between trade and national security; (4) the complex interaction among trade, human rights, labor rights, and the environment; and (5) efforts to protect local culture in an era of globalization. The course is designed not only for students intending to work in international trade law, but also for students interested in careers in other fields of, or relating to, international law who seek an appreciation of the increasingly sophisticated connections among these fields and trade. Prerequisite: A basic course in International Trade Regulation (e.g., suitable summer study program or work experience), or permission of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Fall semester. Legal aspects of typical American enterprise structures, including partnerships and corporations. The elements of agency relations are included. Emphasis is upon the control, management, financing, and regulation of closely held corporations. LEC
View current sections...
Spring semester. A continuation of Business Associations I involving further study of corporate problems. Primary emphasis is on the legal responsibilities of directors and dominant shareholders of both publicly and closely held corporations, and the remedies for enforcement thereof. Also included are brief introductions to corporate capital structure and the Securities Act of 1933. Prerequisite: Business Associations I. LEC
View current sections...
Provides students with an introduction to the areas of law which they must understand to represent visual artists, collectors, and museums. Covers, among other subjects, intellectual property rights in art, licensing of artworks, sales and purchase of artworks, importation and export of art, etc. LEC
View current sections...
A problem approach to planning important business transactions, such as organization of a close corporation; organization of a public company; dividend and other corporate distributions; corporate liquidations; and corporate combinations such as merger and consolidation. Each problem is analyzed from the perspectives of tax, securities regulation, and corporate law. Prerequisite: Business Associations I and II or Business Organizations, Federal Income Taxation, and Taxation of Business Enterprises. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis of the regulation of federal and state securities laws of instruments issued by various business entities, exemptions from registration requirements of securities laws, regulation of "paperless" securities transactions conducted by means of the Internet, federal preemption of state securities laws, and the antifraud provisions of securities laws. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores a number of ethical issues frequently encountered by lawyers in greater depth than the introductory course in professional responsibility. Students write several memoranda on real life scenarios which they observe. They assume the roles of counsel for defendant, disciplinary administrator, and judge. Subjects covered include: competence, compensation, conflicts of interest, counseling disabled clients, litigation ethics, and civility. Prerequisite: Professional Responsibility is a prerequisite but, with permission of the instructor, may be taken concurrently. LEC
View current sections...
This 2 hour seminar will examine capital punishment as a system of law and will address many of the intertwining questions raised by the existence of the death penalty in America: How, as a statutory and procedural matter, is the death penalty implemented in America; what procedures are peculiar to the imposition of death as a punishment; why are those procedures used, and to what extent are they either adequate or inadequate; do we, as individuals and as lawyers, accept capital punishment as a working legal system. LEC
View current sections...
Addresses the law and practice of commercial arbitration, a rapidly growing form of alternative dispute resolution. Drafting arbitration agreements, the enforceability of arbitration agreements, selecting arbitrators, the arbitration hearing, and the enforceability of arbitration awards. Gives special emphasis to arbitration of international commercial disputes and the institutional rules under which such arbitrations proceed. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to commercial transactions under the Uniform Commercial Code. Emphasis on secured transactions and the interplay between Article 9 of the Code and the trustee's powers under the Federal Bankruptcy Act. Analysis of basic problems in the area of consumer credit. Required course. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the law governing modern payment systems, including checks and other negotiable instruments governed by Article 3 of the Uniform Commercial Code and bank transactions governed by 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Other payment systems that may be examined include credit cards, debit cards, automated clearinghouse payments, stored value cards, wire transfers, and letters of credit. LEC
View current sections...
This is an upper-level course that will provide a detailed examination of the law associated with the construction industry. The course will be divided between contract formation issues and litigation issues. The contract formation portion will explore design and engineering services, professional responsibility, bidding, bidding government contracts, contract preparation, subcontracting, indemnity and insurance issues. The course will then focus on litigation issues, including liens, delay claims, construction defects, manufacturer's warranties, and design defects. There will be an in-depth examination of the AIA (American Institute of Architects) and AGC (Associated General Contractors) form documents and the use of ADR in the construction field. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of recent court decisions affecting both the working and nonworking poor, particularly in the areas of legal representation, housing, reproductive freedom, faith based initiatives and children's health care. Current legislative proposals and policy papers written by proponents and opponents of welfare reform will also be assigned and discussed. LEC
View current sections...
This seminar addresses a fundamental legal question, i.e. what rights are to be accorded to animals both in nature and in human society? The participants will read and discuss a number of theories of animal rights based upon philosophical, religious, pragmatic, and biological bases and will explore the legal and jurisprudential ramifications of these theories. Students will be required to write a substantial research paper of publishable quality. Students must enroll for both semesters of the academic year for one credit hour per semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to criminal procedure, including investigation and police practices, pre-trial proceedings, trials, sentencing, and review proceedings. Particular emphasis on the application of the exclusionary rule to arrest, search and seizure, interrogation procedures, and identification procedures. LEC
View current sections...
A general introduction to and comparison of major legal systems of the world, with special emphasis given to how those systems reflect differing cultural values in addressing common legal questions. A major goal of the course is to deepen the students' understanding of law and practice in the United States and to broaden their perspective of law beyond the boundaries of the common law systems. (Same as ISP 876.) LEC
View current sections...
Explores the many interesting facets of complex litigation in the context of mass torts. Bifurcated and special proceedings, class actions, consolidation, multidistrict litigation, and complex joinder issues, as well as substantive issues which arise in mass tort litigation. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis and consideration of problems respecting the law applicable in transactions or to relationships with elements in more than one state or country. The law to be applied in such situations, the theoretical bases of choice-of-law, and the issues which these matters can present under the Constitution of the United States are discussed. Far-reaching changes are occurring in basic assumptions and methods of approach in the field of choice-of-law, and special attention is given to these developments. Finally, the class considers the recognition and enforcement of foreign state judgments in terms of both standards and requirements that flow from relevant provisions of the Constitution. Prerequisite: 45 hours law school credit or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This class considers the role of law in regulating, managing, utilizing, and conserving the earth's rich biological diversity. Biodiversity law is explored from the perspectives of common law, statutes, agency regulations, and international law. Special consideration is made of the role science plays in informing biodiversity law and policy. Prerequisite: Environmental Law Survey. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the process of acquiring a public company. Develop issue spotting skills through simulating representing an acquiring company. Topics covered include background work, non-disclosure agreements, due diligence, negotiation of terms and conditions, drafting of documents, regulatory approvals, security law compliance, and closing. Practice points emphasized include the importance of planning and anticipation in the transaction process, ethical considerations in negotiating transactions, and constraints of time and money. Courses recommended but not required: Securities Regulation, Taxation of Business Enterprises, and Antitrust. Prerequisite: Business Associations I and II or Business Organizations. LEC
View current sections...
‹ First  < 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 >  Last ›

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.