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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An examination of the ethical issues, philosophies, and decision-making systems that affect marketing communications. Through studies of specific business cases, students gain insight into the cultural, legal, and social decisions that affect an organization's future. LEC
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This course covers a wide range of financially-related concepts from the perspective of the communications function. Topics include: financial markets; finding and using key Securities and Exchange Commission filings; understanding the balance sheet, income statement and cash flows; financial analysis; investor relations; impact of Sarbanes-Oxley; corporate governance issues; building and using budgets; and impact of these concepts for not-for-profits. LEC
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Students learn how marketing and media research help determine the success of an organization's marketing planning and strategic communications processes. Students study and conduct primary and secondary research - both qualitative and quantitative - including focus groups, ethnography and surveys. Prerequisite: JOUR 820 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores new and emerging technologies and their impact on the delivery of marketing messages. Students will work with the instructor on identifying areas of relevance to them, and on identifying ways to keep up with changes in technology, innovation and audiences. LEC
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This course examines cases and topics of leadership as a process in a marketing communication organization. As a manager's duties evolve from performing tasks to managing relationships and strategic organizational outcomes, the capacity to lead becomes critical to personal and organizational success. Topics will focus on the role of leadership and vision, strategy, communication, ethics, social responsibility, group dynamics, and change. LEC
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The speed and scope of modern marketing communication have made the world a much smaller place. This course explores how international companies use advertising, public relations, promotion, personal selling and other methods to communicate in a global multicultural environment. Students gain a broader understanding of the characteristics of people in different countries and cultures, especially how they rely on media for information about products and services to meet their needs. LEC
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Research in the issues and development of media. Seminars focus on topics of current and historical interest. Students develop projects and presentations in special areas of interest and expertise. Course may be repeated under different topics. LEC
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In this capstone course, students use the skills they have developed in the marketing communications program to create a strategic integrated marketing communication plan for a client. The process involves the use of techniques such as research, branding, advertising, public relations, promotion, as well as other activities. Through the project, students demonstrate their knowledge of marketing communications and work with team members to meet an organization's strategic marketing communication needs. Prerequisite: JOUR 820, JOUR 828, JOUR 829 and 30 hours or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course offers the opportunity for a student group of students to develop an individualized project to enhance professional communications skills. The student or group works in conjunction with a graduate faculty advisor to develop a suitable project, presenting a proposal for approval to the School's Graduate Director. The proposal must specify the nature of the project, the products to be delivered, a timeline for completion, and expected impact. Prerequisite: Admission to a KU graduate program. LEC
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This course offers the opportunity for a student or group of students to develop an individualized project to enhance professional communications skills. The student or group works in conjunction with a graduate faculty advisor to develop a suitable project, presenting a proposal for approval to the School's Graduate Director. The proposal must specify the nature of the project, the products to be delivered, a timeline for completion, and expected impact. Prerequisite: Admission to a KU graduate program; satisfactory completion of JOUR 851. LEC
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This course covers a wide range of financially-related concepts from the managerial perspective. Topics include: risk and return, financial markets; understanding the balance sheet, income statement and cash flows; financial analysis; the Securities and Exchange Commission; investor relations; corporate governance; building and using budgets. Limited to graduate students or instructor permission. Lecture, discussion, case studies. LEC
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The student, with the guidance of a master's project/thesis committee completes execution of the project or thesis. In addition, the student completes the final, general examination and the presentation/defense of the project or thesis. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of JOUR 898, Master's Research. THE
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"Portal" course introducing doctoral students to the history of mass communication ideas and issues, the mission of the program and ethical guidelines for graduate studies. The course also introduces the School faculty and their interests. Students take Proseminar in the first semester of matriculation specifically to prepare for the coursework to come. Proseminar also will introduce students to the culture of tenure-track faculty to launch them on the path to becoming ethical and productive citizen-scholars. Limited to Journalism PhD students. LEC
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An introduction to Japanese for students enrolling in the Summer Study Abroad Program. Familiarity with the basic structural patterns of the language is stressed through general conversation. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are introduced. LEC
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Continuation of JPN 100. Available to students who took JPN 100 as part of the Summer Study Abroad Program. Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 100 or equivalent. LEC
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Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill per week. Acquisition of basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). Not available for credit for students who have previously completed JPN 101. LEC
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Continuation of JPN 104. Prerequisite: JPN 101, JPN 104, or equivalent. LEC
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Three hours of lecture, three hours of drill. Prerequisite: JPN 108 or equivalent. LEC
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Enhancement of conversational ability at the intermediate level. Used primarily to accommodate transfer credits. Prerequisite: JPN 204 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of JPN 204. Prerequisite: JPN 204. LEC
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Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar included. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Two semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC
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Instruction in special skills in Japanese, such as pronunciation, recognition of Chinese characters, comprehension of broadcast media, etc. at the freshman/sophomore level. Course work must be arranged through the office of KU Study Abroad and approved by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Intensive practice of communicative skills at the advanced level. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of JPN 306. LEC
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Supervised and individualized study and practice of language skills through direct experience in interviews and guided practical applications in various public settings in Japan. Some conventional classroom instruction in grammar and usage. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. Prerequisite: Four semesters or the equivalent of Japanese language study. LEC
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Instruction in special skills in Japanese, such as pronunciation, recognition of Chinese characters, comprehension of broadcast media, etc. at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the office of KU Study Abroad and approved by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Instruction in discussion in formal contexts and speech making. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings in Japanese on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Readings in selected modern Japanese texts on various topics: history, education, language, society, business, and literature. Meets three hours per week. Prerequisite: JPN 208 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of JPN 504. Prerequisite: JPN 504 or equivalent. LEC
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Study of Japanese language especially appropriate to business situations. Although the course emphasizes developing conversational ability, the primary focus is on strengthening reading and writing in the specialized area. The course includes discussion of non-verbal aspects of Japanese business practices as well. Prerequisite: The first semester of third-year Japanese or the equivalent. LEC
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Introductory grammar and readings in classical Japanese texts. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC
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Continued readings of classical Japanese texts, on the intermediate and advanced level. Introduction to the elements of kambun (Sino-Japanese) and sorobun (epistolary) styles. Prerequisite: JPN 542 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and interpretation of modern Japanese texts from various fields. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: JPN 508. LEC
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A continuation of JPN 562. Prerequisite: JPN 562 or equivalent. LEC
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This course strengthens reading and writing skills and continues developing conversational ability. It assumes a higher level of competency in Japanese than JPN 509 and includes both verbal and non-verbal aspects of Japanese business practices. Prerequisite: Completion of third-year Japanese or equivalent. LEC
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Students will read selections from materials on a given topic or topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or permission of instructor. IND
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Varying topics with varying prerequisites. LEC
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Advanced language training for the study of Japanese sources in the humanities or social science field of the student. Prerequisite: JPN 564 or consent of instructor. RSH
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A detailed examination of various Japanese language reference works and research materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of different types of reference works to carry out research strategies. Prerequisite: JPN 508 or equivalent and JPN 580. LEC
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This course introduces students to new subject matter, perspectives, and/or interdisciplinary approaches to Jewish Studies. Topic, instructor, and prerequisite to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. LEC
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The course focuses on the narratives through which Jews made sense of their lives under the impact of the forces of modernity, beginning in the "old world," and moving through the 19th century and into the 20th. The goal is to analyze how the imagination of Jewish writers was captured by the changes in social structures such as new educational, residential and occupational opportunities, leading to increased interactions with the gentile society. Students read and discuss literary works based in the shtetl in revolutionary Russia, and in America. We will also look at memoirs and letters written by ordinary Jews. All assigned texts will be in English. LEC
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Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as SLAV 318.) LEC
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By examining the modern concept of Yiddishkeit (Jewishness), this course explores Jewish secularism as a set of modern intellectual, literary, and cultural practices that redefined the relationship between the secular and religious in literature, music, theatre, art, humor, and foodways. This interdisciplinary course draws on theoretical approaches from history, cultural studies, religious studies, folklore, and linguistics to examine the different secularizing cultural practices of the Jews in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as in North America. LEC
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This course explores the variety of ways in which American Jews create Jewish identities as individuals and groups. It traces the emergence of the various current divisions within Judaism: Reform Judaism (which by definition, implies Orthodoxy), then Conservative Judaism, and then the later development of Reconstructionist Judaism. The course also explores other contemporary options for being Jewish: cultural Jews, secular Jews, unaffiliated Jews, religious Jews, and gay or lesbian or transgendered Jews. LEC
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In this class, we view films in English, Yiddish, Hebrew and Russian (with subtitles) to explore issues of Jewish identity, culture, and religion. We discuss important historical and cultural processes such as the break-up of the shtetl life, immigration to America, Zionism, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust, as well as the friction between religious and secular ways of life, and learn to apply our understanding of these processes to film analysis. LEC
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Investigation of a special topic or project selected by the student with advice, approval, and supervision of the Faculty Advisor in Jewish Studies. Such study may take the form of directed reading or special research. Regular reports to and conferences with the advisor are required. A final research report will be required. Course may be taken more than once; total credit not to exceed 6 hours. Open only to students pursuing a minor in Jewish Studies. IND
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Required for Honors in the minor. The honors version of JWSH 490. Open only to students pursuing a minor in Jewish Studies. IND
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Examination of special topics in Jewish Studies. Topic and instructor to be announced in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated if topic varies. LEC
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Jewish folklore is extraordinarily rich and varied. From folktales to riddles, from legends about the exalted rabbis to irreverent jokes, folklore is central to the Jewish way of life. This course traces the extent to which oral elements appear in traditional Jewish literary texts such as the Bible; read and discuss folktales, and examine minor genres such as proverbs, riddles and jokes. Topics include the supernatural beings of Jewish folklore dybbuks, seductive female demons, and golems. Students acquire theoretical tools with which to analyze folklore (Jewish or otherwise), read stories, watch movies, and collect samples of folklore from informants. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic from interdisciplinary areas in Jewish Studies. Topic, instructor, and prerequisite to be announced in Schedule of Classes. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. Basic level or oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of KiSwahili. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. A continuation of KISW 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: KISW 110. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in KiSwahili. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern KiSwahili texts and discussion in KiSwahili. Prerequisite: KISW 120. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in KiSwahili. Continuation of KISW 210. Discussion in KiSwahili of texts studied. Prerequisite: KISW 210. LEC
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A practical KiSwahili language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in KiSwahili. Designed for students who have had two or more years of KiSwahili study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: KISW 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of KISW 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of KISW 310 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of KISW 401. LEC
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The course objective is a sophisticated command of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in KiSwahili. Texts used include newspapers and other KiSwahili publications not expressly for language learners, and spoken material intended for native speakers is introduced. Conversation and oral presentations. Advanced grammar. Available for elective credit in the major. Prerequisite: Native, near-native or second language competence or satisfactory completion of fourth level language proficiency. LEC
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Five hours of class and two hours of drill in the spoken language each week. Grammar and readings in selected texts. LEC
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Continuation of KOR 104. Prerequisite: KOR 104. LEC
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Five hours of class and two hours of spoken drill. Readings in selected texts in modern Korean. Prerequisite: KOR 108 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of KOR 204. Prerequisite: KOR 204. LEC
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Readings in Korean on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Readings in and discussion of selected modern Korean texts on various topics: history, literature, society, and language. Prerequisite: KOR 208 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of KOR 504. Prerequisite: KOR 504 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions of modern Korean texts from various genres, including short stories, newspaper editorials and articles, and other expository and literary writings. Through reading these materials, students will build the vocabulary and reading proficiency needed to approach the level of an educated native speaker while learning about Korean culture and society. Prerequisite: KOR 508. LEC
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This course is designed to expand student's knowledge of the University community by exploring an academic theme and the connections between courses. Through the study of different topics students explore the inherent relationships among fields of study. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. Enrollment is limited to students participating in designated learning community. Concurrent enrollment in specified learning community courses is required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 hours if topic varies. SEM
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Emphasizes the vocabulary of and fundamentals of reading and writing the Cherokee language. Students will have an opportunity to learn the language, beliefs, and religious practices of the Cherokee. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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Continuation of Cherokee Language I. Includes an intermediate level of vocabulary skill with increased emphasis on reading and writing. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 110. LEC
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An enhancement of communication, time management, and leadership skills. The students will explore resources and determine goals pertinent to their objectives regarding graduate school. Restricted to students in the Dean's Scholars Program. LEC
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Special topics at the undergraduate level. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Special permission from the Provost's Office required. LEC
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Introductory survey of the origin, evolution, and distribution of Indians throughout North America, location of tribes in historic times, their relationships to one another, and their responses to white penetration of the continent. Emphasis on American Indian leadership and major contributions of American Indian people to American society. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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An overview of current and historical issues which have resulted in policies and regulations affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives. The issues include: education, treaties, sovereignty and self-determination, religions, natural resources, legislation, jurisdiction, reservation and/or urban status, federal trust relationship, tribal economics and enterprises, American Indian policy, federal recognition, and current issues both regional and local. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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An introduction and general overview of federal Indian law and processes and its relationship to tribal governments. Focus will be on sovereignty and its relationship to the internal and domestic laws of the United States government, tribal governments, and the international community. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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An introductory study of the special relationship that exists between the federal government and tribal governments. Included will be a general overview of specific programs, laws, and court decisions that address the unique relationship that exists between two sovereign nations; the United States Government and tribal governments. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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Inventory and identify the resources currently available to tribal governments to include natural and human resources and those financial resources available to tribal governments from federal, state, and private resources. Included will be an economic analysis on how to best optimize available resources while recognizing the economic concept of constrained maximization. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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Examines the continuum of chemical abuse and dependency and the emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual effects of addictions on individuals, families, and communities. In addition, treatment approaches and relapse prevention efforts are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on integrating Native American understandings and responses to chemical addictions. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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Continuation of Cherokee language II. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 120. LEC
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This course is a continuation of LA&S 230, Cherokee Language III, and includes the study of grammar, with particular attention to speaking fluency and continued practice in reading and writing. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 230. LEC
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The beliefs and values of Western civilization from the eighth century BC to the close of the eighteenth century are compared with the ideas central to American Indian cultural traditions. Fulfills the Western Civilization I requirement for CLAS. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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The beliefs and values of Western Civilization since the close of the eighteenth century are compared with the ideas central to American Indian cultural traditions. Fulfills the Western Civilization II requirement for CLAS. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
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Science and Mathematics students explore teaching as a career by teaching lessons in elementary classrooms in order to obtain first hand experience planning and implementing inquiry-based curriculum. This course is open to any student who has completed or is concurrently enrolled in a science or mathematics course at KU. LEC
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Science and Mathematics students continue to explore secondary teaching as a possible career choice by teaching several lessons in a middle school classroom. The students build upon and practice lesson design skills that were developed in LA&S 290, in which they taught in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: LA&S 290. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. LEC
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This course is designed to expand student's knowledge of the University community by exploring an academic theme and the connections between courses. Through the study of different topics students will explore the inherent interdisciplinarity of fields of study. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. Enrollment is limited to students participating in designated learning community. Concurrent enrollment in specified learning community courses is required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 hours. LEC
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"The Art and Science of Computer Presentation." An inter-disciplinary course designed to explore current technology in "Computer Presentations" (various equipment and programs), research the field of information processing, and develop applications for interactive multi-media communications. Not open to students who have received credit for LA&S 740. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students explore theories and strategies of teaching and tutoring writing across academic disciplines. They learn more about themselves as writers as they build a repertoire of writing techniques useful in their studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. By observing and consulting in the writing center, they understand how reflection leads to responsible/responsive and engaged practice. (Same as ENGL 400.) LEC
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Integrates Native American traditional knowledge of ecology and biology with modern, western science. One purpose of the course is to preserve the unique knowledge and varied cultural traditions relating to the life sciences that are possessed by indigenous people. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 150. LEC
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Special topics at the junior/senior undergraduate level. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Special permission from the Provost's office required. LEC
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This course provides credit for supervised practical experiences in an occupational area of interest. In addition to the work-related activity, students complete reading and writing assignments, participate in an on-line discussion and create a final portfolio of internship accomplishments. Hours of credit recorded (1-5) are based on number of hours at internship site and agreement of instructor. Credit hours will be assigned a letter grade. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Topics include Sanskrit. Designed especially for Juniors and Seniors. LEC
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This course explores theories motivating writing center administration and practice. Students will investigate the multiple functions of writing centers, from writing labs associated with college composition instruction, to decentralized resources for writing faculty teaching writing across the disciplines, to elementary, secondary, and community support centers for writers, to online consultation services. Students will choose a special interest or problem, and, from an administrative perspective, design a research study and propose actions such as creating policy, developing curricula, designing materials, or conducting assessments. (Same as ENGL 885.) Prerequisite: LA&S 400, ENGL 400, or consent of instructor. LEC
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"The Art and Science of Computer Presentation." An inter-disciplinary course designed to explore current technology in "Computer Presentations" (various equipment and programs), research the field of information processing, and develop applications for interactive multi-media communications. Not open to students who have received credit for LA&S 340. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of a variety of topics from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. Usually intended for graduate students, but may also be taken by qualified upper level undergraduates. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC
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An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. (Same as HIST 124.) LEC
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This course offers an in-depth examination of several key themes in Latin American Studies. Emphasis is placed on exploring the utility of interdisciplinary methods and on becoming familiar with the theoretical framework that underpins the field. Prerequisite: Completion of LAA 100 and one other course in the major. LEC
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Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
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This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. LEC
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