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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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This course traces the various manifestations of the Devil through Russian and European folklore, myth, theology, culture, and literature. Although the focus is on Russian literature, classic European works are discussed, as they had a powerful impact on the modern Russian conception of the Evil One. Readings in English. (Same as SLAV 566.) LEC
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An examination of conceptions of masculinity from Europe and North America since the eighteenth century. Historical examples illustrate a diverse range of topics, including medicine and the body, emotion and willpower, consumption and beauty, war and fascism, homophobia and sexual orientation, and the interplay of race and class in conceptions of manhood. (Same as WGSS 570.) LEC
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An examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the West since the sixteenth century. Contemporary theories of embodiment are applied to a variety of historical themes, which may include posture, manners and morality; cleanliness and hygiene; exercise, dieting and body-building; sexuality and personal identity; fashion, make-up and cosmetic surgery; vegetarianism, self-help literature and alternative medicine; tattooing and body modification; and the history of the senses. (Same as WGSS 575.) LEC
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Examination in depth of the historical, social, and artistic growth and development of one major urban center. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of elements that have contributed to the development of a particular civilization, such as Irish, Scottish, or Scandinavian. LEC
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An intensive examination of the history and theory of masculinities in the Western World since the sixteenth century. Students will become acquainted with some of the key theories of men and masculinities, examine in depth the interplay between manhood and modernity, and develop research projects on a topic negotiated with the instructor. May be repeated if content varies sufficiently. LEC
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An intensive examination of the role of the human body in the creation of personal and social identities in the West since the sixteenth century. Emphasis is on understanding how contemporary theories of embodiment are applied to concrete historical or contemporary problems. May be repeated if course content varies sufficiently. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This is an interdisciplinary course which will focus on the social, culture, and political environment for business in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa. The emphasis will be on the factors influencing and shaping the current and rapidly-changing political and economic contests of African countries. The course is open to both business and nonbusiness students, and is designed to explore the connections between language and area-studies topics and the practice of business in Africa. The course will be organized around modules covering geography, language, culture and society, history, politics, and economics. Most of these modules will be covered by visiting faculty with specialization in those areas. There will also be guest lectures by government officials involved in managing and promoting business ties between the USA and Africa, as well as from practicing business people in the area who have had experience in African markets. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in East Asia. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language and area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the School of Business and the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. Prerequisite: Sophomore status (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Latin America. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the Business School, the Center of Latin American Studies, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in the "transition economies" of the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. Faculty teaching the course will be drawn from the Business School and college departments associated with the Center for Russian and East European Studies (e.g., Political Science, History, Sociology, Geography, etc.) Prerequisite: Sophomore status (30 hours). LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and nonbusiness majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as EURS 401.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (30 hours). LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of international business topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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To conduct International Business, a manager must understand the prevailing political, economic, legal and socio-cultural institutions in the relevant countries. In addition, s/he must also understand the institutional arrangements that countries have negotiated to govern cross-border flows of trade and investment capital, such as the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund. This course provides an analysis of the institutional settings for international business and explores their implications for a multinational firm. Specific topics covered include, but are not limited to, the forces behind international economic integration and globalization of business, differences across countries, and the frameworks of international trade, investment and finance. Prerequisite: ECON 144. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will focus on the business and managerial practices that have evolved in response to major characteristics of Latin American business environment. A survey of Latin American economic conditions (including inflation, stabilization, regional integration, and privatization) will set the stage for the examination of management practices that have developed in response to these conditions. Prerequisite: Completion of an intermediate macroeconomics course is strongly recommended or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines Japanese business in the context of both Japanese society and the global economic environment. An overview of the Japanese economy, with special emphasis on employment patterns and trends, will be combined with an examination of business-government relations and the role of Japanese culture on organizational behavior. Prerequisite: MGMT 310 or consent of instructor and junior status. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms conducting business in the country. The first part of the course reviews the country's geography, history and culture, and examines its contemporary political process, economic structure, financial system, and legal and social institutions. The second part of the course examines important strategic and operational decisions such as market entry, contract negotiation, value chain management, choice of marketing strategies and techniques, and human resource management. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: IBUS 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Following a brief study of nature of the (formerly) centrally planned economies, emphasis will be placed on the current transition to the market-based systems. Special focus will be placed on privatization, the evolution of labor and financial markets, and the legal and regulatory frameworks for conducting business. A comparative approach will be taken in the analysis of individual markets and performance. Prerequisite: Junior status unless a specific course is needed or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course explores how culture, in all of its aspects, is a major determinant of organizational practices and performance. We analyze how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Finally, we will investigate the possibilities for transferring certain practices between cultures. A primary goal is to provide an understanding of the complex linkage among the cultural, social, economic, and political variables that influence organizations and drive the differences and similarities in organizational behavior and business strategy, as well as the values and expectations of organizational members. This is accomplished through readings, lecture, in-class exercises, and case analyses. We emphasize the development of the skills necessary for managing multicultural diversity in both domestic and international settings. Major illustrations are drawn from all world areas, and each student develops in-depth knowledge of one country through a semester-long project. Prerequisite: MGMT 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In the global economy, managers need to expand their repertoires of knowledge and skills in order to be effective. This course examines the important managerial issues arising from a firm's expansion into the international arena and introduces an array of analytical frameworks and management techniques that can be useful to an international manager. Specific topics covered include foreign market entry decisions, strategies and organizational structures for managing a multinational corporation, and management of various functional areas (such as production, marketing, finance and human resources) in an international setting. Prerequisite: FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in international business not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on economic, social, and political trends in the global environment and examines their implications for national and regional competitiveness. Extensive use will be made of guest speakers from other departments and local companies. Flexibility in format is required to accommodate instructional methods that will include lectures, discussions, cases, and simulations. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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This introductory course aims at providing a framework for understanding the basic concepts, practices, and issues involved in international business and economic relations. Focus is placed on (1) the evolution of the present international monetary and trade systems, with emphasis on the role of the IMF and GATT (now the World Trade Organization); (2) the nature and current transition of former centrally planned economies; (3) the nature and prospects of less developed countries; and (4) the interdependence of the major industrialized nations (with coverage also of regional integration initiatives). This course is not open to students with credit in IBUS 410. LEC
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Managing across nation means managing across cultures, languages, institutions, time zones, governmental regulations, etc. In addition, multinationals (and the more recent phenomenon of off-shoring) are not always viewed in a positive light. International Business Strategy will explore both the benefits and challenges involved in managing activities across borders. Topics covered include: the analysis of fit between a company, its products and specific international markets; assessing and responding to competing pressures to hold down costs while adapting to local demands; and optimizing organizational structure to facilitate knowledge location and movement. Case studies are used to develop analytical and decision-making skills and also highlight the reality of environmental uncertainties influencing decision making in the international context. LEC
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This course explores how culture, in all of its aspects, is a major determinant of organizational practices and performance. We analyze how and why organizational communication and practices vary from one culture to another, as well as why certain values and cultural contexts might make particular management styles more successful than others. Finally, we will investigate the possibilities for transferring certain practices between cultures. A primary goal is to provide an understanding of the complex linkage among the cultural, social, economic, and political variables that influence organizations and drive the differences and similarities in organizational behavior and business strategy, as well as the values and expectations of organizational members. We accomplish this through analysis of a series of related cases, providing a nuanced look at the effects of culture on multiple business functions within a single company. This foundation is supplemented by readings, lecture, and in-class exercises. We emphasize the development of the skills necessary for managing multicultural diversity in both domestic and international settings. Major illustrations are drawn from all world areas, and each student develops in-depth knowledge of one country through a semester-long project. Prerequisite: MGMT 701. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in a particular foreign country. Students will travel to the country of interest to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in that country. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at an in-country host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. ). Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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The course analyzes the unique aspects of the Chinese business environment and the major managerial issues that are likely to confront firms conduction business in the country. The first part of the course reviews the country's geography, history and culture, and examines its contemporary political process, economic structure, financial system, and legal and social institutions. The second part of the course examines important strategic and operational issues such as market entry, contract negotiation, supply chain management, marketing strategies and techniques, and human resource management. Recommended: IBUS 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course analyzes the business environment of Latin America and the managerial practices that have evolved in this unique context. Using cases, readings, lectures and videos, the course seeks to cover a broad set of countries, industries and companies as it examines the conduct and performance of business in Latin America. Recommended: IBUS 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The class will use a mix of lectures, guest speakers, cases and assignments to understand the context and contemporary practice of business in India. Topical industries/issues will be covered in the course. The course deals with the challenges related to consumer diversity, human resources, political environment and infrastructure. Unique Indian business practices and models used in rural marketing and supply-chain management will be examined. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in China by observing it in practice. Students will travel to China to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in China. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Chinese host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Specific prerequisites may be required for a particular offering of this class. LEC
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This course provides students an opportunity to learn about business in Latin America by observing it in practice. Students will travel to a Latin American country to visit a variety of companies and meet with their managers to learn about the unique opportunities and challenges faced by companies operating in Latin America. Company visits will be selected to include both manufacturing and services firms and to reflect a variety of ownership structures (foreign subsidiaries, locally-owned companies, joint-ventures, etc.). Lectures from faculty at a Latin American host institution will provide specific information on the local business environment and cultural, historical and institutional context. Specific prerequisites may be required for a particular offering of this class. LEC
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The class will expose you to economic, political and cultural aspect of this growing market and the impact rapid growth and economic transformation are having on Indian businesses. We will visit businesses, cultural centers and educational institutions in India. Industry leaders and experts will make presentations in India. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business management to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This seminar surveys the literature, classic and contemporary, that forms the theoretical basis of the international business field. Topics covered include but are not limited to: (1) institutional issues such as the international framework of trade and investment, crosscountry governance differences, and the role of NGOs; (2) firm-level strategic issues such as choice of market entry modes, international entrepreneurship, and management of multinational enterprises; and (3) group- and individual-level organizational issues such as international staffing and cross-cultural management. Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program or graduate standing and permission of the instructor. LEC
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Exploration of problems in drawing for various reproduction processes. Emphasis on perspective, head drawing, the clothed and nude figure, nature illustration, perspective, and environments. Various drawing media and materials are explored. Required for Illustration majors as a pre-review course. Prerequisite: BDS 101. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing methodologies for producing contemporary illustration. Emphasis is placed on concept development, composition exploration, value and color studies, and reference creation. Required for Illustration majors as a pre-review course. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing skills and techniques with media and materials that are employed in producing contemporary illustration. Continued emphasis on methods of research and idea generation as in VISC 204. Prerequisite: ILLU 305 and permission of instructor. Corequisite: ILLU 405. LAB
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Continued exploration of problems in drawing and painting for various reproduction processes. Emphasis on color, head drawing, perspective, the clothed and nude figure, environments, and nature illustration. Various drawing, painting, collage and digital media and materials are explored. Prerequisite: ILLU 205 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: ILLU 315 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Concentrated study of different forms of concepts for illustration. Continued development of technical skills and visual literacy are also addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 305 and ILLU 315. LAB
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Introductory exploration of the process, skills and concepts necessary for successful concept art character design and effective blending of matte painting and film. Drawing will be of primary concern for this course, yet exploring digital means of character development will also be introduced. Prerequisite: ILLU 315. Corequisite: ILLU 415. LAB
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Exploration of thematic illustration through the development of a series of images based on a topic or story. Aspects of continuity, consistency, storytelling, pacing, editing, packaging and a holistic method of developing illustration are addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 415 and ILLU 425. Corequisite: ILLU 445. LAB
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Continuation in exploration of the process, skills and concepts for successful concept art character design, along with continued development of digital characters and 3D modeling. Prerequisite: ILLU 415 and ILLU 425. Corequisite: ILLU 435. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing skills and techniques with digital media and materials employed in producing basic contemporary animation. (ILLU 415) Development of concept, script, storyboard, and use of audio, music and sound effects are part of this animation experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ILLU 515 and ILLU 445 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Preparation of comprehensive portfolio and consideration of professional requirements encountered by illustrators in the visual communications industry. Participation in the Visual Communications Senior Show is required. Prerequisite: ILLU 435. Corequisite: ILLU 535. LEC
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Visual communication projects with particular development of each student's strengths and interests in illustration. Completed projects constitute a core for a student's portfolio. Contemporary business practices and legal issues will be addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 525. LAB
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Individual research. RSH
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This course will focus on drawing as a tool of communication through a variety of exercises that explore observation and perception, form and proportion, dimensional illusion and expressive characteristics using a variety of materials and media. This course will also use two- and three-dimensional modeling software necessary for all Industrial Designers. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Design Department. LEC
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Course introduces tools, techniques and processes used in the professional practice of Industrial Design. Learning is through a series of short, focused projects. Techniques in drawing, computer modeling, physical modeling, and presentation are demonstrated and developed. Strategies to improve creativity are explored, while addressing market and production considerations. Prerequisite: BDS 102. LAB
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Course introduces tools, techniques and processes used in the professional practice of Industrial Design. Learning is through a series of short, focused projects. Techniques in drawing, computer modeling, physical modeling, and presentation are demonstrated and developed. Strategies to improve creativity are explored, while addressing market and production considerations. Prerequisite: INDD 284. LAB
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Course combines the study of advanced drawing systems theory with study and practice in visual perception methods, techniques, and media relevant to the fields of industrial design and interior design. Prerequisite: ABDS 212. LAB
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Individual and/or group research projects in one of several specific design areas which will be identified on a semester by semester basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Eligibility for INDD 302 (industrial design majors) or permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of INDD 284 and 388 but encompassing design problems of greater complexity including group research and problem solving assignments in advanced product and service design. Advanced techniques in problem solving, concept communication, visualization, and overall design expression will be demonstrated and explored. Prerequisite: INDD 388. LAB
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Continuation of Industrial Design studios, projects are longer requiring a high level of demonstrated design ability for successful completion. Issues regarding professional ethics, accountability, and responsibility to public and client are discussed and implemented. Professional design, presentation, and visualization skills will be demonstrated and explored. Finished designs will include full production technical specifications. Prerequisite: INDD 446. LAB
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Experience in industrial design practice gained while working in an internship position within a professional industrial design firm (consulting office or corporate design department). Experience must be gained while working under the guidance of a cooperating, qualified design professional. Details of each internship, e.g., name and location of firm, identity of cooperating professional, length of internship, hours worked each week, nature of work experience, methods to be used in evaluating student performance, etc., must be satisfactorily defined, arranged, and agreed upon jointly by the student, the firm offering the internship, the instructor under which the course is listed, and the industrial design area head prior to the student's enrollment in the course. Prerequisite: INDD 384, INDD 388, INDD 508, INDD 512, INDD 578, INDD 646, INTD 504, and consent as described in the course description. Course may be repeated for credit to earn a maximum total of six semester hours credit applicable toward a degree. FLD
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A study of modern materials, manufacturing processes, and construction methods applicable to the fields of industrial design and interior design. Design analysis of existing products, furniture, building components, and storage systems. Design assignments in furniture, storage systems, and interior space arrangements with emphasis on materials and construction. Field trips to area manufacturing and design facilities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the field of human factors (erogonomics) appropriate to industrial, interior, and visual design. Human capabilities, human-machine interfaces and system properties, and the environment are considered, a micro-computer laboratory is integrated into the course. Open to all university students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor for non-art and non-design majors. Corequisite: BDS 102. LEC
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Introduction to the study of methods of designing common to industrial, interior, and visual design. Evaluation methods (semantic differential), creativity methods (scenario writing), and task-oriented method: (PERT/CPM) will be considered in relation to design problems. Open to non-design students. Prerequisite and/or Corequisite: INDD 384 or INTD 301 for industrial design majors and interior design majors respectively. Consent of instructor for all other students. LEC
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Work directed toward maximizing the quality and effectiveness of the individual student's professional portfolio. Prerequisite: INDD 448. LEC
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Course requires the accomplishment of a comprehensive, independent research, design, and development project appropriate to the field of industrial design, the depth and complexity of which are commensurate with expectations for entry-level professionals. The nature and scope of the project, as well as details of anticipated accomplishment must be outlined by the student and approved by the instructor prior to the beginning of the second week of classes. This course requires completion of all research, basic problem solving, preliminary design phases of the project, final design development and refinement, detail technical specifications, renderings, physical and computer model building, and a written documented report of the project. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: INDD 448. THE
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Similar to INDD 578, Problems in Industrial Design, except as follows: design topic to be selected jointly by student and instructor with content, methodology, and anticipated accomplishment to be outlined by the student and approved by the instructor prior to enrollment in the course; design projects will normally be undertaken by each student on an individual rather than group basis and selected according to his or her needs, strengths, weaknesses, and interests; and students may enroll in up to two sections of same course (3-6 hours) during same semester. Prerequisite: Industrial design majors: completion of fourth-year requirements; or for non-majors, permission of instructor. LAB
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Research-oriented advanced study in industrial design. Prerequisite: Graduate major in industrial design or consent of instructor. RSH
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Prerequisite: INDD 715. RSH
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This course will provide an overview of health informatics focused on five themes: health informatics foundations; clinical decision support; human factors/organization factors; public health informatics and current issues in health informatics including best practices. Students enrolled for 3 credits will develop and demonstrate a practical, innovative small-group information technology (IT) project from one of a set of faculty recommended projects or from a student-proposed idea. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor LEC
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Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. The application of the information system development life cycle in the design, selection, and implementation of health information technology applications will be examined. Human computer interactions and emerging technologies will be explored for their impact on patient care and safety. The role of legal, regulatory, ethical and security issues will be discussed as they apply to clinical and consumer information technologies. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1-2 credit hour practicum. Principles of database theory, modeling, design and manipulation will be introduced. Students will have experience using a relational database management system. Database manipulation will be explored using structured query language (SQL) to compose and execute query statements and critically evaluate the results. Prerequisites: None. LEC
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Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. The information system development life cycle process is presented with emphasis on determination and analysis of information system requirements and system design that meet the identified health care information requirements. Object-oriented techniques will be introduced, including Unified Modeling Language and Unified Modeling Methodology, to facilitate process analysis and design proposal development. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. LEC
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Includes 2 credit hour lecture and 1 credit hour practicum. Knowledge management is the creation, communication, and leveraging of a healthcare organization's knowledge assets. Defining knowledge, describing the knowledge creation cycle, and the identification of the knowledge worker and his/her impact on the organization are discussed. Information technology and communities of practice are presented in a balanced approach supporting a systematic viewpoint of the knowledge management process. Knowledge management theory is enhanced with the performance of a knowledge audit and the development of knowledge management tools. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. LEC
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In collaboration with healthcare information faculty, preceptors, students design an experience to facilitate application of theories and research related to health care informatics. Emphasis is on the application of the information system development life cycle. Students analyze the leadership and technical behaviors of various informatics roles and negotiate an informatics project to be completed within the practicum. Prerequisite: All Common Core, Leadership Core, NRSG 853, Abstraction and Modeling of Health Care Information, NRSG 858, Health Data: Theory & Practice. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NRSG 854, Knowledge Management in Healthcare, NRSG 855, Topics in Healthcare Informatics, NRSG 898, Research Project in Nursing, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will conduct a health informatics research project. A research report, designed artifact, or other appropriate deliverable will be developed. Prerequisite(s): A research course and two informatics core courses, or consent of instructor. The capstone project must meet capstone guidelines for the MS Informatics program. LEC
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An introduction to the theoretical areas of computer science and their applications. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which computer science makes judgments and on what computers can and cannot accomplish. Among major topics covered are: how to read and to implement algorithms; what is memory and how much of it is required for various tasks; why computers cannot multiply; how finite-state machines compute; applications of finite-state machines to programming; recognizing languages; formal grammars. "Can machines think?" and other contemporary topics in the philosophy of computer science will be covered as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104. LEC
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The course explores some of the most significant and enduring ideas in mathematics: the great theorems, discoveries of beauty and insight that stand today as monuments to the human intellect. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which mathematics makes judgments. Among the major topics covered are: Euclid and the infinitude of primes, Archimedes determination of circular area, Cardano and the solution of the cubic, the Bernoullis and the harmonic series, a sample of Euler's number theory, Cantor and the transfinite realm. Along with the essential mathematics, the humanity of these great mathematicians is captured. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, high school algebra and geometry, and permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to allow students to do further readings in the theory of computing beyond the material presented in IPS 101. Topics, scope, and meeting times to be arranged for the individual student. Prerequisite: IPS 101 and consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the study of Indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Applied Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from diverse cultures. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of American Indian life are interconnected and that tribal histories cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. Students are introduced to controversies over how to research, write, and interpret American Indians, and will address the foundations of Indigenous Studies, and that is Indigenous concepts of decolonization, empowerment and Nation-building. The course explores how the lives of Indigenous people have been affected by colonization, while exploring the varying definitions of "colonialism", "colonizer" and the "colonized." LEC
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A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed GINS 331. (Same as REL 330.) LEC
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A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed ISP 330. (Same as REL 331.) LEC
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideologies surrounding modern United States Federal Indian policy. It will survey the European intellectual trends that were influential in creating policies that were (and still are) applied to the colonized Native peoples. The course will explore the roots of US Indian policy, including removals, "civilization programs," the reservation period, the Dawes (Allotment) Act, the New Deal, termination, relocation, NAGPRA and tribal rights, in addition to the issues surrounding American Indian identity, tribal membership and demographics. This course serves as the foundation for more in-depth study into the complicated and ever-changing field of Federal Indian Law as it pertains to the Indigenous peoples of the United States. (Same as HWC 490.) LEC
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This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Nations Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines in order to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Recommended for juniors or seniors, or for students who have completed ISP 101/GINS 101/INS 101. LEC
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Examines the roles of activist Indigenous women in politics, social work, academia, business, environmental and health issues. Compares and contrasts the ideology of the predominantly white feminist movement with the goals and concerns of the "Red Power" movement and emphasizes Indigenous socio-cultural values and concerns. Profiles prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers, in addition to topics of serious concern to Indigenous women: violence, racism, loss of culture and language, education, health care and other manifestations of continued colonization. LEC
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This course investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. The class traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems and offers traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC
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An introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills are emphasized. Guest lectures from ISP faculty members, librarian, and members of the Writing Center serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Trains students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? Includes an overview of Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. Examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. Focuses on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping, and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. LEC
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A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of externally-dominated economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law will be used. The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as GEOG 801.) LEC
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An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. LEC
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The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Unpacking key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills will be emphasized. Guest lectures will serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions LEC
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Designed to fulfill program needs of the Indigenous Nations Studies master's program, this course may meet with appropriate professional or graduate courses. Can be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC
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Students will analyze the qualities of American Indian leadership and will examine circumstances and backgrounds of Indian leaders as heroes and role models paying particular attention to how they responded as individuals, leaders, and as community members of their tribes. Besides surveying noted Indian leaders in treaty negotiations, allotment, removal, war, etc., the course will examine leaders in medicine, education, and recent American Indian history including attention to women leaders. Students will learn about the leaders' tribes and cultures in addition to understanding the ethnohistory of Indian-white relations. LEC
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An individual readings course with a qualified instructor on a topic in Indigenous Nations Studies. LEC
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