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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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The course is designed to cover a basic understanding of the anatomical and mechanical principles of human movement. Areas covered will be joint and segmental movement, muscle actions, time-displacement motion description, forces causing or inhibiting motion, and stability. Special attention will be given to the application of the theoretical concepts in movement activities. Prerequisite: A course in human anatomy. LEC
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This course will examine the qualitative biomechanical analysis of human movement directed towards the goals of performance improvement and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Specifically, this course will provide students with a basis knowledge of the biomechanical foundations of human movement, the knowledge and skills necessary to complete a systematic analysis and evaluation of human motor performance, and the ability to determine and provide interventions that are likely to improve movement in athletic, clinical, educational, and work environments. Prerequisite: A course in human anatomy, admission to the HSES Teacher Certification Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A fundamental study of the physiological adjustments that occur within the body during exercise. The presentation of this material is particularly oriented toward a basic understanding of the physiological systems as they are affected by the activity of a normal coaching or teaching situation. The physiological values of exercise are also stressed. Prerequisite: Three hours of physiology . LEC
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This course will provide the student with the knowledge and skills to assess components of physical fitness in adults including cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, strength, and flexibility. In addition, specific emphasis will be placed on the development of exercise and weight management prescriptions. Students completing the course will have the skills to take the Health Fitness Instructor Certification exam given by the American College of Sports Medicine. Prerequisite: Exercise physiology or equivalent. LEC
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This course will examine the processes that underlies the use and production of energy for exercise. Topics that will be explored include glycogenolysis and glycolysis in muscle, cellular oxidation of pyruvate, lipid metabolism, metabolism of proteins and amino acids, molecular biology, neural and endocrine control of metabolism, and local fatigue during exercise. Emphasis will be placed on carbohydrates, protein, and lipid metabolism and the acute and chronic effects that exercise has on these processes. Prerequisite: HSES 672. LEC
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Motor development in childhood and adolescence and its relationship to physical growth. Factors influencing motor learning and development will be explored. This course provides basic understanding of the neuromuscular changes and abilities of children and adolescents. Prerequisite: A course in kinesiology and anatomy. LEC
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This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional work before being fully prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research articles and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. (This course fulfills the requirement of a research methods course in the first 12 hours of graduate study.) Prerequisite: Must be an admitted HSES graduate student. LEC
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A study of the nutritional factors that affect health at all ages. Specific nutritional needs and effects of deficiency states on health will also be addressed. The course will also include the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the use of nutrients for human growth and development as well as the production of energy through the metabolic process. Prerequisite: HSES 330 or equivalent experience and permission of instructor. LEC
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A supervised internship experience in an approved exercise science setting. Students will gain experience through a hands-on approach via clinical and/or research settings. The specific type of internship experience will be agreed upon by the student and their academic advisor. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 24 graduate credit hours. LEC
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This course is designed to provide practical community health experiences in health education and wellness promotion, including: assessment, planning, implementation and program evaluation. With approval of the instructor, students may choose their practicum focus in any of the ten content areas of health: mental and emotional, family living, growth and development, nutrition, personal health, alcohol tobacco and other drugs, communicable and chronic diseases, injury prevention and safety, consumer health and environmental health. Prerequisite: Enrolled in graduate school and consent of the instructor. LAB
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The course has been designed to address issues and concepts relating to the biological aging process as a foundation for physical performance, general fitness, and health status. The biological concepts are applied to the human physiological aging process and the systems involved as well as the possible interventions that may effect that process. The several theories associated with physiological aging are also addressed as related to the physiological systems and current research that may impact the understanding of these theories. Prerequisite: A course in basic biology. LEC
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A supervised internship experience leading to initial physical education teacher certification. The student assumes the total professional role as a teacher of physical education in an approved school setting. FLD
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This course is designed to explore the philosophy and principles which provide the foundation of health education as an academic discipline. Specific topics include: history of the profession, theories of health behavior and behavior change, principles of learning applied to health communications, health promotion practices, professional preparation, and the integration of philosophical and ethical ideals into program planning and implementation. LEC
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A special course of in-depth study exploring current trends and issues in health and physical education - primarily for undergraduates. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to study current developments and trends in the financing, programming, design, and construction of facilities for intercollegiate athletics and professional sports. Prerequisite: Admitted to graduate school. A course in the administration/management of sport or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Given that theories of health behavior drive research and practice in health education, the purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major theories and planning models related to health behavior change. Particular focus will be applied to the role of theory in health promotion and critical analysis of the application of theory to guide research practices. Prerequisite: Health major or consent of the instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to introduce students to the current research and theoretical perspectives in the sport psychology literature. Specifically, students will gain a broad understanding of the three major areas of sport psychology: social psychology (e.g., motivation), performance enhancement (e.g., mental skills training), and psycho-physiology (e.g., impact of anxiety on performance). Prerequisite: Admission in the health program or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Students will learn the techniques of operating various types of laboratory equipment and will conduct small-scale lab experiments in areas such as respiration, circulation, metabolism, strength, neuromuscular function, cardiac function, and body composition. Special emphasis will be placed on laboratory techniques of assessing physical fitness. Prerequisite: A course in exercise physiology. LAB
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The long range objectives of this course are to assist students in gaining stress management knowledge; to help them to formulate improved perspectives on various stress management techniques; and consequently apply the developing constructs in their lives with a sense of purpose and self-responsibility. Prerequisite: Two courses in health education or consent of instructor. LEC
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A wide range of topics from the exercise physiology literature will be discussed. Instructor and students will present reports to the group centered on current research findings with discussion aimed at application of these results to physical exercise and training. Prerequisite: A basic course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will examine the movements and the structure and function of human beings by means of the methods of mechanics. An emphasis will be placed on the two primary goals of biomechanics: performance improvement and injury prevention and rehabilitation. Topics to be covered include the kinematics and kinetics of human movement, muscle mechanics, bone and joint mechanics, and the biomechanics of musculoskeletal injury. Prerequisite: Courses in calculus, physics, anatomy, and biomechanics, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An advanced study of the physiological and biomechanical aspects of muscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory function as the human is engaging in exercise. The topics of energy metabolism, hormones, and nutrition as related to exercise also are presented. Prerequisite: A basic course in exercise physiology. LEC
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This course is designed to review and discuss current issues in various health related areas. The focus will be on relevant issues and topics that are guiding and directing the health profession. The range of topics discussed will vary from popular literature to scientific research and cover such areas as health education, community health, and health over the lifespan. Students in the course will be expected to report, discuss, and interact with each other concerning the issues as they are reported. Prerequisite: A graduate course in health or consent of the instructor. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to explore planning models used for designing, implementing and managing health promotion programs. Students will be trained to develop objectives, assess determinants, select methods and strategies, pre-test program materials, and adopt and implement promotional plans. Problem based and community based learning experiences will be provided. Prerequisite: A health major or permission from the instructor. LEC
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This course will be a discussion of various concepts related to aerobic and resistance training. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of information presented in this course by achieving satisfactory evaluations of presentations, papers, and an examination of the following topics: energy metabolism, general adaptations of aerobic and resistance training, exercise techniques for aerobic and resistance training, periodization of training, testing and evaluation of aerobic and resistance training performance, and exercise prescription for aerobic and resistance training. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to enhance understanding of the variety of legal issues which affect health educators and their audiences. Specifically, this course will survey federal, state, and local public health laws and regulations which may proscribe health education content and the health educator's actions. Legislation will be analyzed and the practical impact of the health educator upon the legislative process will be emphasized. Prerequisite: A course in community health or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will examine the behavioral principles that influence health and exercise practices. Theories of human behavior, reinforcement theory, and models of self-esteem will serve as the foundation for studying behavior change. Society influences will be strongly emphasized. Course topics will include exercise determinants, motivation, media representation, negative behaviors, self-efficacy, social support, and effective promotion strategies. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course involves the study of the etiology and natural history of infectious and non-infectious diseases including vector control, host defenses and resistance, investigation of disease outbreaks, mental health and public health. The course deals with detailed analytic and descriptive epidemiology and their implications for improving our understanding of health and diseases; epidemiologic consequences of nuclear war and retrospective and prospective approaches in epidemiological research. Contemporary developmental methods for disease prevention will be critically reviewed. Prerequisite: HSES 573, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will provide the student with an in-depth study of the structure and development, contractile mechanics, and neuromuscular system as it relates to the skeletal musculature. Structure and Development - muscle fiber, motor neuron, neuromuscular junction, muscle receptors, muscle formation, development of muscle innervation. Putting Muscles to Work - ion channels, pumps, and binding proteins, axoplasmic transport, resting and action potentials, neuromuscular transmission, muscle contraction, motor units, exercise, muscle metabolism. The Adaptable Neuromuscular System - fatigue, loss of muscle innervation, recovery of muscle innervation, neurotrophism, disuse, muscle training, injury and repair, aging. Prerequisite: HSES 810 or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the principles and applications of finance and economics in the sport industry. Strategic financial planning as a part of managements responsibilities is highlighted. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School. LEC
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Current literature concerning the impact of American social values and cultural patterns of sport and physical activity will be studied. Critiques of related research involving sport and social institutions, and socio-cultural groups in sport will be emphasized. Prerequisite: A course in Sociology of Sport or consent of instructor. LEC
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Study of the history, theory, models, and application as they relate to the decision-making responsibilities of sport participants and management. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School. LEC
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The study of research-based instructional and assessment methods appropriate for PK-12 physical education. Managerial, instructional, and supervisory skills will be developed. Traditional and alternative assessment tools will be discussed. Readings, observations (live and video), and practice teaching will prepare students to complete a practical experience and an action research project in a PK-12 school. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate School. LEC
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This course describes the timeline for physiologic adaptations to long-term physical activity. It describes the effects of physical activity on chronic disease. It describes, from a population perspective, the effects of physical activity on the health of the nation. Prerequisite: 12 hours of HSES courses, or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the elements and processes of curriculum construction in physical education for elementary, secondary, and post-secondary institution, and the institutional and professional issues that affect these processes. A study of contemporary curricula structures in regard to planning, implementation, and evaluation of K-12 curricula and professional preparation curricula in physical education programs. Prerequisite: A course in physical education curriculum, or equivalent. LEC
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A survey of leadership and management principles and techniques utilized by athletics administrators. Philosophy, leadership, management, communications, motivation, ethical and legal issues are also studied. Students are provided with views on these topics by current leaders in the world of sport. Prerequisite: Admitted to Graduate School. Consent of the instructor. LEC
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This course has been developed to help students gain an understanding of the scope of sport marketing in the many different sports and exercise settings. The students will also be exposed to the reasons and methods of fund raising. Other areas that will be covered are: methods of selecting the appropriate marketing strategy, significance of sports marketing, preparing a marketing plan, and becoming familiar with the resources available on the Internet in the marketing area. Prerequisite: Admitted to graduate school. A course in administration/ management of Physical Education/Sport, Facilities Management, Recreation, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Techniques for analyzing data gathered in Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences laboratories and field studies will be presented in this course. Techniques for the recording of raw data, appropriate organization of raw data, selection of test for analysis of data, use of computer software, and computer programming for analysis and reporting results of the data will also be included. Prerequisite: PRE 710, PRE 720, or PRE 725. LEC
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An in-depth study into the research and other forms of literature will be made to study and examine the latest trends in elementary and secondary school physical education. Games, activities, dances, and rhythms will be presented and discussed relative to developmental levels of students grades K-12. Prerequisite: A methods course in teaching physical education or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will be a discussion of various concepts specifically related to exercise and the cardiovascular system. By the end of the semester, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the interaction of exercise and cardiovascular system by achieving satisfactory evaluations on examinations, abstracts, and classroom presentations. The following topics will be discussed as they relate specifically to exercise: homeostasis and cardiovascular transport mechanisms, basic structure and function; characteristics of cardiac cells; the heart as a pump; the peripheral vascular system; vascular control; venous return and cardiac output; regulation of arterial pressure; cardiovascular responses to stress; and cardiovascular function in pathological situations. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in exercise physiology or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will provide for supervised and directed experiences in selected sport management settings. The graduate advisor will schedule observations of the internship, as well as regular conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the internship will be prepared by the student, the agency supervisor, and the university graduate faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program in Sport Management. FLD
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This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the basic concepts of the American legal system and the application of them to intercollegiate and professional sports. Particular emphasis will be given to risk management and preventive law. Other topics include: governance issues in intercollegiate and professional sports, contract law, employment discrimination, labor relations and collective bargaining, agency law and athlete agents, regulation of participation in intercollegiate and high school athletics, sport facility and event issues, participant liability issues, product liability issues, premises and spectator liability, participant violence in sports, and intellectual property law. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in School of Education LEC
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This course is designed to provide a general research seminar learning experience for graduate students in HSES. In particular, students will learn about faculty research activities and interests from a variety of specialty areas both within KU and outside of KU. Through faculty and guest presentations, students will be exposed to a variety of design and methodologies used to conduct research in the specialty areas of HSES. LEC
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This course is designed for students interested in optimizing motivation and adherence to exercise among individuals in a wide range of physical activity settings (e.g., health clubs, corporate fitness, physical therapy). The course content includes a review of the literature highlighting the psychological benefits of exercise, the theoretical advances in understanding the psychological aspects of individuals' participation in physical activity, and strategies and techniques for professionals attempting to foster motivation and adherence to exercise among their clients/members. Prerequisite: Admission in the health program or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. RSH
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This course is designed as an in-depth study of the pedagogy of health education. It is concerned with the effects of various health education models, new materials, and innovative teaching techniques. The effectiveness of various media such as films, slides, transparencies, microcomputers, and assessment tools will be analyzed. Research concerning innovations in education will be investigated along with a study of future trends in the field. Timely issues of controversy about health education practices and the effectiveness of values clarification activities will also be discussed. LEC
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This course will include an in-depth examination of metabolic and endocrine principles as they relate to physical exercise and training. Specific topics will include: substrate utilization in exercise, metabolic controls, muscle biochemistry, body composition, nutritional aspects and hormonal influences in exercise. Both instructor and students will report on the most current literature relating to the topics. Prerequisite: Human biodynamics or a course in biochemistry. LEC
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This is a course for students to examine the sources and areas which provide financial support for research projects. The areas of study include types of research funding available on a local, state, and federal level, the elements and design of writing a proposal and strategies involved in securing financial support for research. A focus for the course will center upon preparing a research proposal for funding. Prerequisite: PRE 710. LEC
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This course has been designed to bring together the many scientific factors relating exercise and physical activity to health and human function. The course focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of this relationship and reviews the physiological, sociological, psychological, and behavioral factors involved. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of graduate level course work in health or physical education and admission to health or physical education doctoral program. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC
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This course will explore the latest philosophical issues and controversies which are impacting the fields of health, physical education, and athletics. The student will explore the current and future ramifications of each issue and its potential effects on the profession. Prerequisite: Admission to the Health, Sport, and Exercise Sciences Doctoral Program. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agency, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD
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To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD
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Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH
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This seminar based course will be designed to prepare the doctoral student for academic careers or careers in industry after they graduate. The topics covered will be promotion and tenure procedures and expectations, including but not limited to teaching, responsible conduct of research, professional ethics, historical ethical issues, evaluation of ethical dilemmas, and service expectations at research intensive institutions, regional comprehensive institutions and small liberal arts colleges. Industry career options will be discussed and guest speakers from various disciplines will be brought in to discuss options and expectations with this career path. Prerequisite: Doctoral student or permission of the instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education, perspectives and methods in the humanities, the humanities and human diversity, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. LEC
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An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education; perspectives and methods in the humanities; the humanities and human diversity; and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
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A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
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A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
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Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. LEC
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Honors version of HWC 150. Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, or permission of instructor LEC
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A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen except members of the University Honors Program. LEC
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A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen except members of the University Honors Program. LEC
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A sequel to the two Western Civilization courses which offers the opportunity to examine influential works of literature, philosophy, history, and political thought written since the end of World War II. In keeping with the decline of colonialism and the growth of global and multicultural civilization since 1945, the readings of the course are selected from both Western and non-Western writers. LEC
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An interdisciplinary course, focusing on different topics and drawing on diverse media, cultures, and historical periods. Humanities-based, this course, depending on its topic, may include the arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. May be repeated for credit with different topics. LEC
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The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as EURS 302.) LEC
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The study of great books in English translation from antiquity through the fifteenth century from two or more national literatures. LEC
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The study of great books in English translation from the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries from two or more national literatures. LEC
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The study of great books in English translation in the modern period (late nineteenth and twentieth centuries) from two or more national literatures. LEC
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A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E. -500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as CLSX 317, HA 317.) LEC
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Preparation for senior thesis project required of HWC majors. Introduction to writing strategies, library investigation, and time management skills. Open to HWC majors and others engaged in research and writing at the undergraduate level. Class will proceed by discussion of skills, methods, and examples, and will culminate in a written proposal from each student. LEC
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An introduction to recent cultural theory and interdisciplinary methods used across the humanities and qualitative social sciences. Includes examination of traditional views of the humanities and its implicit cultures along with discussion of new methodologies of cultural analysis. LEC
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An overview of Western Legal education, both in historical and modern contexts. Legal subjects such as constitutional law, contracts, property, the courts and ethics are also studied. Students gain perspective on law as a profession, and the legal environments in which we live. Note: this course does not guarantee admission to law school or constitute entry into the legal profession as a career. It is intended to provide information and help students identify interests in the field of legal study. LEC
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An integrated study of several disciplines such as history, philosophy, art, music, and literature as they relate to the twentieth century in one country, or one historical or aesthetic movement occurring during this time. LEC
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Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern nations and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as CLSX 374.) LEC
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The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as CLSX 350.) LEC
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A study of selected works in literary theory and of selected problems in literary interpretation and comparative literary methodology, designed to examine and apply systematically basic critical principles and approaches. Study of approaches such as feminism, Marxism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies are carried out through discussion and writing. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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The complete Divine Comedy will be read in English translation, with equal stress on each of its three parts--the Inferno, the Purgatory, and the Paradise. The poem will be explained for the general reader by specialists having a variety of perspectives. (Same as HIST 420.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary seminar on the relations of several of the humanities and the arts. Topics will vary, but the interrelation of the humanities and arts will be the central focus. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the junior year. Required of students majoring in humanities. LEC
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A seminar to result in a senior thesis in the student's area of emphasis in the major. Course includes seminar meetings and individual conferences with the instructor for guidance on topic selection, identification of a project director, investigation of resources, and instruction in writing strategies and documentation styles. Project proposal, completed thesis, and oral presentation required. Required of all students majoring in Humanities and Western Civilization. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the senior year. Prerequisite: HWC 420 for students in the Humanities emphasis, and in Humanities and Literature emphasis, HWC 430 for students in the Western Civilization emphasis. IND
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An introduction to the literature of encounters between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as EURS 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
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Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as EURS 435.) LEC
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A study of the role of animals (especially mammals), both wild and domesticated, in defining the nature of human beings and human culture through the disciplines of religious studies, philosophy, history, art and literature. Both western and non-western courses are examined. LEC
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A study of the phenomenon of visions, their expression in various media, and theories of visionary experience from the humanities and social sciences, with a particular emphasis on critically evaluating the relationship between the visionary experience and its expression. (Same as REL 464). LEC
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An examination of how illness and health have been conceptualized, expressed, and explored in Western literature and art, as well as a consideration of issues and health from the perspectives of philosophy and religious studies. (Same as REL 468). LEC
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An interdisciplinary analysis of the historical origins and present currents within American medicine. This is an integrated study of basic historical, political, economic and professional influences that underlie the character and practice of health care in our century. LEC
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Examination of the symbols, images, scriptures, rites and teachings that define gender in various religious traditions. (Same as REL 477.) LEC
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts and ideologies of US Federal Indian policy. It surveys European intellectual trends that were influential in creating policies applied to colonized native peoples. The course explores the origins of such policies, including removals, "civilization programs," the reservation period, the Dawes (Allotment) Act, the New deal, termination, relocation, NAGPRA and tribal rights, in addition to issues surrounding American Indian identity, tribal membership and demographics. This course serves as a foundation for more in- depth study of Federal Indian Law pertinent to the Indigenous peoples of the United States. (Same as ISP 490.) LEC
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Investigation of a subject in fields or on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Does not replace or satisfy specific course requirements for the HWC major. May be counted as part of the total junior-senior credit hours required. LEC
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A study of significant themes, topics, or problems in the humanities. May also relate an issue in the humanities to the social sciences or natural sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. LEC
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An exploration of major social, political and economic developments post World War II including the rise of the European Union, the integration of Eastern and Western Europe, the growing role of Islam, attitudes towards the United States, and Europe's role in the world economy. Topics may vary based on current events. LEC
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The objective of this course is to provide members of the university community with information that enables them to judge the humanistic, moral, and ethical implications of scientific and technological developments. Formal presentations by guest lecturers, followed by question-and-answer periods, will alternate with panel discussions, symposia, etc., prepared by faculty members drawn from the various departments, schools, and organizational units of K.U. LEC
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This course asks how fiction written in Central Europe engaged and grappled with the totalitarian experience imposed by Nazi and Soviet forms of government. The course focuses on the works by 20th-century Polish, Czech, and Hungarian writers that deal with totalitarianism. (Same as SLAV 514.) LEC
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Studies in one or more national literatures. Discussion and frequent critical papers. Prerequisite: Completion of one junior-senior level course in a language and literature department. LEC
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A survey of the principal modes of Chinese thought from their origins through the imperial period. Not open to students with credit in EALC 132. (Same as EALC 642 and PHIL 506.) Prerequisite: Eastern civilization course or a course in Asian history or a distribution course in philosophy. LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of elements that have contributed to the development of a particular civilization, such as Irish, Scottish, or Scandinavian. LEC
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Students will undertake substantial work in the translation of non-technical writing, e.g., poems, short stories, novels, essays, from any foreign language to English, and examine the practical and theoretical problems encountered in or raised by translation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of at least third-year foreign language work. LEC
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