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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, HIST 721, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, HIST 725, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Selected offerings in geology. Intended primarily for graduate students and qualified seniors. May include lectures, discussions, reading, laboratory and field work. May be taken more than once. LEC
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Advanced geological, geophysical, and engineering characterization of a petroleum reservoir. Includes mapping; petrophysical, production, and pressure analysis; and numerical modeling. Considers economic analysis of steps to improve recovery. Students who have completed GEOL 537 may not take GEOL 837 for credit. LEC
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Introduction to field and laboratory methods commonly used in physical hydrogeology. Practical experience with common water level measurement techniques, various well pumping techniques, well installation and geologic core sampling, and hydraulic testing. Prerequisite: Introductory course in hydrogeology and familiarity with computer use for data processing, or consent of instructor. FLD
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Introduction to laboratory methods for evaluating reactive transport parameters, followed by development and implementation of computer models. Students will gain experience building models starting from basic transport equations using a spreadsheet platform and, where appropriate, commercial software packages. Prerequisite: GEOL 751 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. LAB
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Practical experience in measuring unstable chemical parameters in groundwater, including pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, temperature, alkalinity, specific conductance, and turbidity. Practical experience in collecting water samples for chemical analysis, choosing appropriate sample containers and preservation methods, and special techniques for collecting samples for determination of parameters sensitive to environmental changes such as oxygen level or temperature. Prerequisite: GEOL 753 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. FLD
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Practical experience in cultivating, enumerating and visualizing groundwater microorganisms. Geochemical and molecular techniques for studying microbial community diversity, biomineralization and mineral dissolution, and biodegradation of organic contaminants will be covered. Practical experience in collecting water samples for preservation of microorganisms sensitive to environmental changes such as oxygen level or temperature. Prerequisite: GEOL 753 (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. FLD
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May be repeated. RSH
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Detailed study of systematics, morphology, stratigraphic distribution and paleoecology of major groups of organisms in the fossil record. Specific group or groups covered will vary according to student and faculty needs and interests. May be repeated. Prerequisite: An introductory course in invertebrate paleontology. LEC
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Study of the physical and chemical factors important in the genesis and diagenesis of carbonate rocks. Includes the application of principles learned from research on modern marine environments to the interpretation of ancient carbonates. Various analytical techniques are covered with emphasis on thin section petrography. Prerequisite: GEOL 331 and GEOL 732. LEC
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Description, classification, and interpretation of sedimentary rocks, emphasizing petrographic methods applied to terrigenous rocks and interpretation of provenance of sedimentary sequences. Prerequisite: GEOL 511 and GEOL 531 or GEOL 532. LEC
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A review of the principles of the geological sciences. Fields considered are: geomorphology, igneous petrology, metamorphic petrology, invertebrate paleontology, groundwater, geochemistry, stratigraphy, sedimentation, micropaleontology, mineralogy, structural geology, and geophysics. Several may be taken concurrently. May be taken more than one semester. LEC
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A special reading course for candidates for advanced degrees in other departments, designed to aid them in obtaining a reading knowledge of German, for purposes of research. Enrollment for undergraduate credit is required. An intensive study of the fundamentals of grammar, proceeding to the reading of material of medium difficulty. Three recitations weekly. Intended primarily for graduate students, but open also to seniors planning graduate study. The course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study in German. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 100. Review of grammar, with emphasis on reading and translation of material of an advanced nature in the candidate's general field. Three recitations weekly. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the first course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 104. LEC
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Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Five hours of recitation per week. Intended as the first course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Open for only 2 hours credit to students who have completed GERM 102. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 104, with additional cultural study. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Open for only 2 hours credit for students who have completed GERM 102. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to University Honors Program. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the second course in sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 104. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of grammar with review of material covered in Elementary German I; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One semester of college German or the equivalent prior to entering K.U. LEC
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Continuation of grammar; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Intended as the second course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 110. Prerequisite: GERM 104 or GERM 106. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 108, with additional cultural study. Five hours of recitation per week. Prerequisite: Open to students who received the grade of A in GERM 104 or GERM 106, or an A or B in GERM 105. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 110. LEC
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Essentials of German grammar and practice in speaking, reading, and writing. Three hours of class per week. Intended as the third course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Not open to students who have completed GERM 108. Prerequisite: GERM 106. LEC
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Same content as GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216 but accomplished in one semester of intensive study. This course also includes readings, lectures, and discussions on topics in art, history, and politics. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Eligibility for GERM 108 and consultation with the department. LEC
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Discussion of landmark works in German drama, poetry, and prose. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films in their historical and cultural contexts. About fifteen full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the film's sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 124. Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films and their historical and cultural contexts. About 15 full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the films' sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussions in English on German intellectual thought, the fine arts, mythology, and folklore in historical and literary context. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Readings, lectures, and discussion in English on the immigration and acculturation of German-speaking ethnic groups in Colonial America and the United States. Emphasis on Americanization during the Colonial period, discrimination in the pre-Civil War era, integration in the post-Civil War era, anti-German hysteria during the World War I era, exiles during the Nazi period, and the near total assimilation of this ethnic group in the United States during the 20th century. LEC
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An introduction to the pagan myths and beliefs of Teutonic antiquity and their survival in the popular traditions of Germanic countries. Selected readings in the Eddas and other sources (in translation). General orientation toward aspects of comparative mythology, archaeology, and anthropology. No knowledge of German or Scandinavian languages is required. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 108 or GERM 110. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Intended as the third course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216, or as the fourth course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 108, GERM 110, or equivalent.. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 212, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 108 and GERM 110 with a grade of A or GERM 109 with a grade of A or B. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Intended as the fourth course in the sequence GERM 104, GERM 108, GERM 212, and GERM 216, or as the fifth course in the sequence GERM 102, GERM 106, GERM 110, GERM 212, and GERM 216. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Course content similar to GERM 216, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: Completion of GERM 212 with a grade of A or GERM 213 with a grade of A or B. LEC
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A continuation of GERM 212 that completes the fourth semester language proficiency requirement. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, and reading with the focus on the basics of the German business communication. Especially recommended for students planning to take GERM 352 and GERM 462. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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One-semester course meeting seven times a week. The material covered is the same as in GERM 212 and contains selections from GERM 216. This course includes written and oral composition, conversation, and grammar review; readings and discussions in the areas of German literature and culture (e.g. art, history, and politics). Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 108 or equivalent and consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed for the elementary study of a Germanic language. Course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in German. Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Analysis of excerpts (read in the original German) from the works of such writers as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Einstein. Prerequisite: GERM 212. LEC
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Intended primarily for premedical students and for students majoring in the natural and social sciences. In addition to the class text there are appropriate outside readings. Prerequisite: GERM 212. LEC
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History, theory, and practice of German folklore with selected readings in German and discussions in English. Special emphasis on the contributions of the Grimm brothers. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Taught in English. Provides a general introduction to German culture and its transformations in international contexts through an examination of the historical, cultural, and literary impact of German emigration and immigration. Historical periods covered include the emigration wave to America after the failed 1848 revolution, the exile communities during the Nazi era, and the multinational migrations in contemporary Germany. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. For centuries German scientists, philosophers and poets have produced groundbreaking literature that has featured magic, monsters and the occult sciences. German poets introduced popular themes, such as the Faust legend and the pact with the devil, and they introduced one of the most popular monsters into literature - the vampire. In this course we will read and discuss fictional and nonfictional works by German authors that address these themes, and we will discuss the influence that these works have had on other nations' literatures. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. This course offers an introduction to art and culture in Germany. This is achieved by exploring a variety of themes, such as music, the arts, pop culture, theater and film. The course places special attention on the historical and cultural context from which these art forms were created. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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Taught in English. An introduction to Berlin as a microcosm of major historical, social, intellectual, and artistic developments in German culture since 1800. Complex epochs such as Bismarckian Prussia, Nazi Germany, the Cold War and Unification are illustrated through diverse materials including news reports, poetry, sociological accounts as well as film and other media. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. LEC
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For students enrolled in the KU Summer Language Institute in Germany. Exercises in selected topics of German grammar. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Extensive practice in writing creatively and speaking German with an emphasis on German history and extensive review of grammar and advanced writing structures. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Extensive practice in writing creatively and speaking German with an emphasis on German culture and extensive review of grammar and advanced writing structures. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Literary masterpieces of the early European Middle Ages will be studied in English translation, especially legendary, heroic, and epic works written in Celtic and Anglo-Saxon, Norse and German, French and Spanish. Topics in Latin culture will include poetry and liturgy, Augustine and Boethius, the Dark Ages and the Carolingian Renaissance. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Literary masterpieces of the later European Middle Ages will be studied in English translation, especially the poetry of courtly love and the Arthurian romances written in French, German, and English. Dante, Boccaccio, and Chaucer will also be included, as will examples typical of Latin religious and secular literature and of vernacular prose genres, e.g. chronicles, travel accounts, and biographies. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Extensive practice in business communication: terminology, texts and correspondence, oral practice in business situations. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Exercises in the translation of a variety of texts from contemporary journalism, cultural affairs, and the social sciences. Translation of expository writing introduces the student to special semantics and syntactic contrast between English and German. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings from current German newspapers and periodicals introduce the student to journalistic style and special terminology in such fields as cultural affairs, business, and politics. Exercises in written German pertaining to these and other fields will be assigned. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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For students enrolled in the KU Summer Language Institute in Germany. Selected works of major German Language writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One course from GERM 340, GERM 344, or GERM 348. LEC
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An introduction to German literature from 1890 to the present. Emphasis on development of interpretive skills, as well as an understanding of literary movements, genres, and concepts of this period. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One course from GERM 340, GERM 344, or GERM 348. LEC
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An introduction to German literature from 1750-1890. Emphasis on development of interpretive skills, as well as an understanding of literary movements, genres, and concepts of this period. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One course from GERM 340, GERM 344, or GERM 348. LEC
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Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions in English. Emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with some consideration of parallel literary phenomena in France, England, and the United States. Not open to native speakers of German. LEC
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Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films in their historical and cultural contexts. About fifteen full-length films from the period 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the film's sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Does not fulfill any requirement in the German major or minor. Students taking GERM 424 will be expected to work at a higher level. LEC
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Background readings, lectures, and discussions in English about major German films in their historical and cultural contexts. About 15 full-length films from 1913 to the present will be viewed and analyzed. The course will raise questions about the film's sources, ideology, techniques, and artistic achievements. Fulfills elective requirements in the German major or minor. Portions of the assignments will be in German. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One 300-level German course or permission of instructor. LEC
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The goal of this course is to maintain and further develop practical conversational skills of students who already have a basic knowledge of German. Discussion will range among topics from everyday German life and current affairs, with German newspapers and magazines providing the orientation. May be repeated. May only be counted once toward the minimum 30 hours in the major. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: GERM 216 or equivalent. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of German. IND
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Introduction to German business practices, including basic information about German economic and corporate life. Especially designed for students intending to participate in an internship with a German company and those who wish to enhance their knowledge of basic business German. Taught in German. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One 300-level German course. LEC
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The appreciation and understanding of selected masterpieces of German poetry, with attention to the basic poetic forms, techniques, and phonological features. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the classical period. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development of German culture with emphasis on life, customs, geography, art, music, and literature, from its beginnings to 1810. Readings and discussions in German and English. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development of German culture with emphasis on life, customs, geography, art, music, and literature, from 1810 to the present. Readings and discussions in German and English. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development and distribution of the Germanic languages, with emphasis on the modern linguistic features of the major members of the language family. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the medieval and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works by a major author (e.g., Goethe, Heine, Fontane, Brecht, Kafka, Grass, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works on a particular topic or theme (e.g., nature, women, art and literature, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German in an area of specialized language or linguistic study (e.g., lexical fields, modern German dialects, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German on some aspect of German culture or folklore, including Landeskunde (study of contemporary Germany). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Practical exercises in the systematic study of idioms and synonyms, designed to foster a more discriminating and effective usage of German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Exercises in the translation of expository and stylistically sophisticated texts from various fields. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Recommended for students intending to teach German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Training in writing reports and seminar papers in German. Recommended for students intending to do graduate work in German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student is required. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A summer course designed principally for secondary school language teachers. Provides an orientation to proficiency-based models in foreign language instruction, national standards in the rating of foreign language proficiency, and curriculum development sessions which address issues of articulation in foreign language curricula. (Not applicable toward a major or graduate degree in German.) (Same as FREN 681 and SPAN 681.) LEC
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Introduction to methods of literary research and presentation of seminar papers. Exercises in the use of basic guides to the study of German language and literature, in the documentation of scholarly research, and in the writing of interpretive essays, based on reading and discussion of selected works from different periods of the departmental "Basic Reading List." LEC
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Differentiation of critical methods. Exercises in textual criticism. LEC
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Stylistic analysis of literary texts; writing in German. LEC
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A systematic study of German phonetics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Discussion of policies in the M.A. program, examinations, thesis proposals, writing of theses, grant proposals, conference presentations, publications of scholarship, and entrance into the academic job market. Required of all M.A. students in the first year in the program. Does not count toward completion of 30 hours of course work for the M.A. RSH
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A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts of German philology and various aspects of historical linguistics, including the nature of language and linguistic change, discoveries of the pioneer philologists of the 19th century regarding the prehistory of German, and the beginnings of a national German language. LEC
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A descriptive study of the phonetics/phonology and grammar of contemporary standard German. Special emphasis on problems of teaching German to English-speaking students. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German literature. May be repeated. Offered only in conjunction with GERM 616 when taught by a Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor. Graduate students will be assigned additional work. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German language and linguistics. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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The elements of Middle High German as required for reading medieval texts in the original. Intensive reading and literary study of at least one text in full. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works of the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German culture. May be repeated. LEC
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To be taken only in exceptional cases. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. RSH
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