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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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A course in practical phonetics with exercises stressing rhythm, intonation, and individual sounds. Prerequisite: FREN 240, FREN 241, or by departmental permission. LEC
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Supplementary non-major language course that can be a sequel to the first four semesters of French. Primarily for students studying abroad. Covers vocabulary study, oral exercises, discussion of texts, writing, and free conversation. Prerequisite: FREN 230/231 or FREN 234, FREN 240/241. LEC
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Analysis of selected texts from various genres; special emphasis on explication de texte. Prerequisite: FREN 300 (or with FREN 300), or by departmental permission. LEC
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A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad programs. LEC
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A study of French grammar, conversation, and composition, with selected aspects of French civilization. Available to participants in the Summer Language Institutes, and selected Study Abroad Programs. LEC
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Systematic grammar review with extensive practice in writing French. Prerequisite: FREN 300 or FREN 326. LEC
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Practical acquisition of skills necessary to understand the language of journalism and business. Prerequisite: FREN 300. LEC
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Three meetings per week. Guided discussions designed to increase fluency, improve pronunciation, and acquire vocabulary. Sections limited to twelve students. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: FREN 300 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 300. LEC
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Three meetings per week. Guided discussions designed to increase fluency, improve pronunciation, and knowledge of French culture and language. Classes have centered around topics such as the French Revolution, the Arts, Renaissance Festivals, and French cinema. Sections limited to twelve students. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: FREN 375. LEC
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An exploration of the French capital from its origins to present as emblem and icon of the social, literary, cultural, and political development of the French nation and of French ideals. Topics include great persons, events, works, symbols, and myths since the founding of the city to the present. Taught in English. Does not fulfill any requirement in the French major or minor. LEC
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Readings and discussions of representative great masterpieces of French literature from the medieval Arthurian romances and chansons de geste to the present, with particular emphasis on the question of the interrelations of form and content. Includes such authors as Rabelais, Montaigne, Racine, Moliere, Voltaire, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Proust, Gide, Camus, and Beckett. Conducted in English. A reading knowledge of French is extremely useful but not a requirement. LEC
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Discussion of great masterpieces of French film from the silent era to the present, with a particular emphasis on how film portrays and conveys important aspects of French culture past and present. The works of a variety of film-makers may be covered, and may include among others Georges Melies, Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, Rene Clair, Marcel Carne, Jean Cocteau, Alain Resnais, Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Agnes Varda, Louis Malle, Eric Rohmer, and Claude Berri. Films will be shown in French with subtitles in English. Knowledge of French is useful, but not required. LEC
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A survey of the historical, philosophical, literary, and artistic development of France, from the beginning through the 17th century. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. LEC
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Continuation of FREN 410, from the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. LEC
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Social, political, and economic trends from 1939 to present, with emphasis on period since 1968. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. LEC
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Cultures of the some 235 million persons in the five world areas whose everyday and/or official language is French: Canada; Caribbean (e.g., Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique); Europe (e.g., Belgium, Switzerland); Africa and Indian Ocean (23 former French or Belgian colonies); Pacific (e.g., Tahiti, New Caledonia). Also French-speaking settlers in the United States (Louisiana, South Carolina, New England, Kansas). French presence in Indo-China and the Near East. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. (May be taken concurrently with FREN 300 and/or FREN 326.) May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. LEC
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This course is an introduction of 20th Century African literature written in French, covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. (Same as AAAS 432.) Prerequisite: ENGL 102 and a 200-level English course. LEC
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Representative topics are: History of Paris, Role of Women in French Literature and Culture, Interrelationships of the Arts, French-speaking African Culture, Culture of French Canada. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission; may also be repeated as part of major in French language and culture. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. May be designated a KULAC class at the discretion of the instructor. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and 326. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and 326. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. LEC
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Study of the principal authors, movements, and themes of the period. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. LEC
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A study of a period, theme, group of authors, or movement. Subject matter will vary; may be taken more than once if subject differs. Prerequisite: FREN 300 and FREN 326. LEC
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May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed fifteen hours. Fields not covered by course work, and/or field of student's special interest. Conferences. Counts as humanities when taken for two or three hours. Prerequisite: Twenty-five hours of French and consent of instructor. IND
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Various topics in French or Francophone literature or culture. May be taken more than once, total credit not to exceed nine hours. Minimum of six hours of FREN 499 required for B.A. with Honors in French. Student must discuss Honors eligibility and their topic with a faculty member before enrolling. IND
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Advanced theory and practice of French pronunciation. Not open to students who have taken FREN 310, except by departmental permission. Prerequisite: FREN 300 or FREN 326 or graduate standing. LEC
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Studies in an aspect of film, a director or group of directors. Emphasis on French film. Given in French or English. LEC
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A survey of the major public images of French culture as surveyed in French silent and sound film from the early 1900s through World War II and its immediate aftermath. Students will view and discuss a selection of films that address crucial aspects of French culture such as (but not limited to) gender, war and peace, daily life, art and artists, tradition and revolution, city life versus country life, social classes, moral choice, and individual freedoms. The course will include discussion of the cultural and artistic significance of major French film movements like Poetic Realism. In addition to viewing and discussing films, students will read and analyze the writings of a number of French intellectuals, writers, and artists who have had a major influence on French culture as it appears in films from 1900-1950. May be taught in French or English. For students who already have some knowledge of French culture. LEC
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A survey of the major public images of French culture as surveyed in French silent and sound film from 1950 to present. Students will view and discuss a selection of films that address crucial aspects of French culture such as (but not limited to) gender, war and peace, daily life, art and artists, tradition and revolution, city life versus country life, colonialism and post-colonialism, social classes, moral choice, and individual freedoms. The course will include discussion of the cultural and artistic significance of major French film movements like the New Wave. In addition to viewing and discussing films, students will read and analyze the writings of a number of French intellectuals, writers, and artists who have had a major influence on French culture as it appears in films from 1950-present. May be taught in French or English. For students who already have some knowledge of French culture. LEC
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Topics vary by semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Departmental permission. LEC
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Exercises in English-French and French-English translation, designed to enable the student to write with greater clarity and precision in both languages. LEC
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Intensive practice in writing French, designed to clarify fine points of grammar and usage and to aid the student in developing an accurate and graceful prose style. LEC
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A summer course designed principally for secondary school language teachers. Discussion of current theory in language acquisition integrated into an intensive oral review of French. Meets three hours daily for two weeks; includes lab. (Not applicable toward a major or graduate degree in French.) LEC
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A summer course designed principally for secondary school language teachers. Provides an orientation to proficiency-based models in foreign language instruction, national standards in the rating of foreign language proficiency, and curriculum development sessions which address issues of articulation in foreign language curricula. (Not applicable toward a major or graduate degree in French.) (Same as GERM 681 and SPAN 681.) LEC
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Introduction to grammar and structure through the reading of representative works. LEC
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Major aspects of development and growth. Conducted in English. LEC
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Introduction to grammar and structure of the language through a reading of representative works from the Troubadour period. LEC
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Linguistic analysis of the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structure of modern French. Description in terms of current theories and models. Application of linguistic analyses to the teaching of French. LEC
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This course provides an overview of current and historical approaches to foreign language teaching, with reference to the instruction of French. Past and current trends and methodologies of language instruction are examined in order to acquaint students with various classroom approaches. Research findings in second language acquisition are explored and their implications discussed so as to show how these findings lead to more effective classroom practices. LEC
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An introduction to the skills required of students doing graduate degrees in French literature; areas covered are 1) introduction to literary theory and criticism, 2) bibliography and research methods, and 3) training in preparation of critical essays and theses. Required of all M.A. candidates unless specifically released by department. LEC
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A detailed introduction to versification, rhetoric, image and symbol as they apply to the study of poetry. Texts will be chosen from one or more periods of French literature and will include poems in verse and prose. Considerations and readings on the history of French poetry, on the composition of recueils, on poetic theory, and on the relation of poetry to other genres and media may be incorporated. LEC
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Selected movements , themes, genres, topics in the cultures and/or literatures of the French-speaking world outside France. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Literary history of the period, with discussion of representative works read for the most part in the original old French. LEC
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A survey of the major writers, covering Rabelais, Sceve, Louise Labe, Marguerite de Navarre, Ronsard, Du Bellay, Montaigne, and d'Aubigne. LEC
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Development of baroque and classical French drama, with emphasis on Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. LEC
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Esthetics of baroque and classicism. Emphasis on Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Mme de Lafayette, although other authors may be studied. LEC
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Special attention paid to Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau; also development of novel and drama. LEC
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Emphasis on major novelists of the century: Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, and Zola. LEC
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Major Romantic writers viewed in context of intellectual, esthetic, and social milieu of period 1800-1850. LEC
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Literary movements developing out of reaction to Romanticism: Realism, Naturalism, Parnassianism. LEC
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Major 20th century authors, stressing Proust, Gide, Giraudoux, Claudel, Sartre, and Camus. LEC
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Principal movements, structures, and tensions of A la recherche du temps perdu. LEC
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To meet Masters degree requirement for continual enrollment. This course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. FLD
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Study of topics not limited to one century. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Literary criticism from historical, theoretical, and practical point of view. LEC
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Selected topics to be specified. Study of form, movements, or themes in the French Novel, not limited to one century. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Selected topics to be specified. Study of form and theory of the French short story, not limited to one century. LEC
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Origins and development of Arthurian legend; analysis of major texts. Prerequisite: FREN 700. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: FREN 700. LEC
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Emphasis on Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Marot, Maurice Sceve and Louise Labe. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Philosophical thought in 18th century as reflected in literature. Emphasis on philosophies, with discussion of external influences. LEC
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Origins and development to Revolution; thematic analysis with attention to critical attitudes and their influence upon evolution of novel as genre. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Works of major symbolist poets, including Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarme, and Valery. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Samuel Beckett to the nouveau roman. LEC
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Various movements, themes, or genres. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Topics in literary, linguistic, and cultural research. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Readings and research projects in French language, literature, and culture. Directed work to fulfill needs not met by available courses. One-three hours credit in any semester. Maximum credit for M.A.: Three hours. By special departmental permission only. RSH
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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For freshmen and sophomores. Study and performance of ensemble literature for the horn. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Study and performance of ensemble literature for the horn. May be repeated for credit. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in French horn. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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For graduate students majoring in French horn. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three credits. IND
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Individual instruction. Open only to students who have been admitted to the D.M.A. curriculum in French Horn. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to two hours. RSH
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. LEC
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An introductory survey of the environmental setting, historically formative periods, and present-day issues that distinguish the major culture areas of the world. Open only to students in the College Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the relationships between humans and their environments. The course introduces students to basic concepts in human geography relating to economic activities, landscapes, languages, migrations, nations, regions, and religions. Serves as the basis for further course work in cultural, economic, political, population, and urban geography. LEC
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An introduction to how human societies organize space and modify the world about them. Resultant patterns on the landscape are interpreted through principles of space perception, cultural ecology, diffusion, land use, and location theory. Comparisons are made between urban and rural areas and between subsistence and commercial societies. Open to students who have been accepted into the College Honors Program. LEC
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The components of the physical environment are discussed in order to familiarize the student with their distributions and dynamic nature. Major topics include the atmosphere, landforms, soils, and vegetation together with their interrelationships and their relevance to human activity. This course and GEOG 105 together satisfy the laboratory science requirement. Both courses are required for geography majors. LEC
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A laboratory course designed to complement GEOG 104 in satisfying the laboratory science requirement. It is required for geography majors. Laboratory exercises include a wide variety of analyses using data on the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere. Prerequisite: GEOG 104, which may be taken concurrently. LAB
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Interactive processes among the systems of the earth are studied and discussed. Major topics include vegetation, soils, landforms, water, the atmosphere, and cycles of matter between these portions of the earth. The course includes lectures and critical discussions to address study problems in physical geography. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by consent of the instructor. LEC
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How do people find their way from here to there or just around? Simple--they use maps. Maybe not maps on pieces of paper but maps in their heads: mental maps. Different people have different maps, even of the same place. Mapping is an ancient form of communication and maps have created ideas and opinions, promoted understanding and confusion. A non-technical approach to the transformation of space onto maps, to their content and structure, and their role and impact in human activity, past and present. Neither background in geography nor artistic skills are required. LEC
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This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory (GEOG 141) survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics will include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. To be taken with GEOG 141. (Same as EVRN 140 and HIST 140.) LEC
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