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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An introduction to the understanding and production of video and time-based art. Students gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of video and time-based art in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: EXM 274. LAB
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Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of EXM 301, The Digital Image I. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 303, Intermedia I. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 314. Prerequisite: EXM 314. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 326. Prerequisite: EXM 326. LAB
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Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Two (200-and/or 300-level) Expanded Media courses. LAB
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Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Two (200- and/or 300-level) Expanded Media courses; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 535. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: EXM 535 or EXM 536. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 536. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: EXM 535 or EXM 536; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB
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Students will gain proficiency in conceptualization and production of performance time-based art in an interdisciplinary art-making environment. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Advanced problems toward the creation of environments using a variety of media including traditional and non-traditional approaches to art-making. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Advanced work focusing on content issues as they relate to development of artwork incorporating digital imagery. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Advanced work in the use/handling and integration of diverse, new and traditional materials, techniques and processes. Advanced problems will involve strategies for discovering and managing combinations of drawn, painted, digital, and constructed forms. Studio sessions will include research, lecture, demos, and quest speakers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 302. Prerequisite: EXM 302. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 302. Prerequisite: EXM 302; and membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 307. Prerequisite: EXM 307. LAB
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Continuation of EXM 307. Prerequisite: EXM 307; and membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average with permission of the department. LAB
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Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Expanded Media courses, of permission of instructor. IND
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Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of Expanded Media studio research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LAB
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Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. LEC
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Continuation of FARS 110. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Course includes reading of simple texts. Five hours of class per week. Prerequisite: FARS 110 or departmental permission. LEC
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A continuation of FARS 120. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Farsi. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: FARS 120 or departmental permission. LEC
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A continuation of FARS 210. Course emphasizes oral and written work in Farsi. Systematic review of grammar and introduction to reading in cultural texts. Prerequisite: FARS 210 or departmental permission. LEC
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This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. Not open to students who have taken FIN 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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This course will provide the tools to help you better understand and improve the financial decisions you'll make throughout your life. You will learn how to analyze the financial effects of spending and investing decisions and how to use credit well, including credit cards. You will develop an understanding of the basics of mortgages, purchase (rent) versus lease (buy) decisions, savings, investments, and insurance. You will acquire an appreciation of the time value of money that provides a foundation for reasonable financial planning. Given the basic tools and terminology you'll learn, the course will help you develop solutions to various practical financial problems that you will face. The course will include the preparation of a basic investment portfolio and brief presentation as to its merits. Not open to students who have taken FIN 101. LEC
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This course acquaints students with the financial institutions. Topics include a review of major international, national, regional money center institutions, investment management and other related institutions. The management and key revenue generators for these institutions will also be discussed. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course acquaints students with the careers in financial institutions. Topics include: careers in major international, national, and regional money center institutions; ethical issues related to financial careers; a comparison of recruiting practices in investment banks, investment management, and corporate finance positions. Placement and recruiting practices in those institutions would be reviewed. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to help the student develop a basic understanding of Finance. Topics covered include (1) financial instruments and the markets in which they are traded, (2) financial planning and analysis, (3) the cost and time-value of money, and (4) the fundamentals of investor decision-making. (Not open to students with credit in FIN 310.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101, MATH 101 and ACCT 200 or ACCT 205. LEC
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This course consists of the analysis of problems relating to estimating the financial needs of an enterprise and to evaluating the alternative means of providing and utilizing both temporary and permanent capital. The relationship of current financial decisions with financial policy is analyzed from the viewpoint of management and the stockholder. Prerequisite: Prior completion of ACCT 200; prior completion or co-enrollment in DSCI 301. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of finance topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of investments. Financial instruments such as common stocks, bonds, options, futures, and mutual funds are analyzed in a theoretical context using efficient market theory, capital market theory, option pricing, and stock valuation models. Experience in practical applications is generally obtained through the use of case studies. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Building on the concepts of present value, the focus of this course is on the theory of and methods for corporate asset selection. The course includes coverage of important technical issues such as risk analysis, evaluation of mutually exclusive projects, capital rationing, and leasing. Some attention usually will be devoted to the topic of project financing. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Apply finance principles to measure and manage the value of companies using a professional's step-by-step approach. In this course, students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They also forecast accounting statements, compare absolute and relative valuation techniques, and evaluate restructuring opportunities and potential flexibility options. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The economic determinants of exchange rates are discussed. This is followed by an examination of the financing problems faced by the multinational corporation and the international portfolio manager, arising from the international nature of their environment. Topics include spot, forward, futures, and options markets in foreign currency, international risk management, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, covered interest arbitrage, and contemporary issues in international financial management. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course examines the use of forwards, futures, SWAPs options, and related financial derivatives for hedging arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation issues, and the techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Explores (a) the financial institutions that channel funds from savers to borrowers, (b) the financial instruments that facilitate those flows, and (c) the financial markets in which those instruments are traded. Equal attention is paid to money markets, bond markets, stock markets, mortgage markets, foreign exchange markets, and derivatives markets. Commercial banking receives special emphasis, but investment banks, thrift institutions, insurance companies, finance companies, mutual funds, securities brokerages, and mortgage brokers are also studied, as well as fringe financial such as payday lenders and pawn shops. The course closes with an introduction to risk management at financial intermediaries. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An in-depth study of commercial banking. The primary focus is the value maximization of the bank, given the legal, technological, macro-economics, and competitive constraints facing bank managers. The course emphasizes bank investment decisions (e.g., underwriting loans), financing decisions (e.g., generating deposits, capital adequacy), and risk-management decisions (hedging interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, and foreign exchange risk). Ongoing changes in financial markets, information technology, and government regulations, and the importance of these changes for banking business strategies, are stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: FIN 430 or co-enrollment in FIN 430. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The central focus of study is on the role of insurance in business and society. The approach is, in general, from the standpoint of the person confronted with problems of risk management and loss prevention in coping with insurable (pure) risk situations. The course is designed to further the ability of the student to analyze and evaluate programs undertaken to control the loss of income which results from the destruction of property values. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is an introduction to bond markets and bond derivatives. Bonds and associated financial derivatives include securities that promise a fixed income stream and by extension all securities whose valuation and hedging are related to interest rates. The objective of this course is to provide students with a guide to financial markets, institutions and instruments associated with debt funds and help them to understand the determinants of the general level and structure of interest rates. The focus of this course is on the concepts and tools that are useful to understand and interpret real world issues related to debt markets. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted LEC
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This course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Prerequisite: Fin 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Investors construct portfolios by choosing allocations across asset classes and by selecting funds or managers within each asset class. This course will (1) examine methods to forecast return and risk across asset classes, including fixed income, equities, real assets, venture capital, buyouts, and hedge fund strategies, (2) describe ways to evaluate the performance of fund managers relative to appropriate benchmarks, and (3) consider optimal allocations among fund managers in various asset classes. Prerequisite: FIN 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from across the finance discipline will be covered as well as material from the supply chain management discipline. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, personal finance, and supply chain management methods will be used to demonstrate modeling. (Same as SCM 418.) Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This is a course about corporate "deals" - corporate transactions that change who owns a business or who controls it. Naturally, the course covers classical mergers and acquisitions, including the financial, strategic and regulatory issues. However, it also covers corporate governance and control, IPO's (initial public offerings), financial distress, and venture capital and private equity. Finally, deals require deal-makers - the investment bankers. We'll touch on aspects of investment banking, an industry that majors in finance and MBA's often work in or have contact with. Prerequisite: FIN 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A purpose of this course is to offer a well-rounded exposure to the theory and practice of security analysis. The course emphasizes the usefulness of sound investment theory as a backdrop for understanding asset pricing in dynamic financial markets. The course forms a bridge between a student's initial exposure to investment theory and the practice of stock selection and active portfolio management. Prerequisite: FIN 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The entrepreneurial finance course will focus on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies (start-ups). The objective is for the students to learn how to make investment and financing decisions (and how to distinguish good from bad investments) in an environment characterized by very high degrees of uncertainty and information asymmetry. We will address this topic from two distinct perspectives: the perspective of users (entrepreneurs) and suppliers (venture capitalists and other private equity investors) of capital. In the beginning of the semester we will first take the perspective of the individual entrepreneur (or manager). We will focus on identifying good ideas (evaluating projects using different valuation techniques), separating them from bad ideas, and placing a quantitative value on these opportunities. This part will review different valuation methods used to value start-up companies. We will also deal with issues such as forecasting cash flows of a start-up firm and ways to grow the firm using internal resources. Then we will turn our attention to the next step in the entrepreneurial process - raising capital to take advantage of good opportunities. Specifically we will consider venture capital (independent venture capitalists, angels, and corporate venture capitalists) as a source of financing for start-ups. This part will provide overview of the venture capital industry (players, organizational forms, contracting) and introduce students to the challenges of structuring venture capital deals. In addition, we will cover other ways of raising capital to aid the growth of the entrepreneurial firm. The focus will be on the private debt market as well as other alternative sources of financing for start-up firms (SBA loans, SBICs, mezzanine financing, L/Cs, etc.). Finally, we will study the ways to harvest the ventures (IPOs, acquisitions, LBOs). Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course will have three primary objectives. First, students will review basic valuation methods, including instruction on the location of relevant resources. Some advanced valuation techniques will be examined, e.g., APV, multiples and capital cash flow. Finally, students will work to apply these techniques to particular corporate financial decisions. Prerequisite: FIN 415. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in finance not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course is designed to give students increased practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account of the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Students will analyze portfolio decisions and determine the risk/reward profile of the portfolio. The student will apply many different valuation models to current and potential equity holdings in the portfolio. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides an overview of the problems associated with the financial management of business firms. The focus is on the practices followed by managers in raising and investing capital so as to maximize value. Prerequisite: ACCT 701. LEC
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Adopting the perspective of the CFO, this course focuses on the problems and opportunities, analytic methods, and solutions in the businesses' (1) working capital management, (2) long-term capital investments, and (3) financing. The unifying theme involves balancing expected return and risk in order to maximize the financial value of the enterprise. LEC
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This course provides a framework for describing the nature of securities markets. The focus is on efficient markets, capital markets, and portfolio theory. Through the use of theoretical models, students gain an understanding of the methods and techniques utilized by the professional investor and portfolio manager. Not open to students with credit in FIN 410. Prerequisite: FIN 701 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course emphasizes the applications aspects of investments. Various valuation methods are applied to securities of different types with emphasis on bonds, common stocks, options and futures. Case studies are often used to convey key concepts and strategies. Not open to students with credit in FIN 410. Corequisite: FIN 705 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course focuses on the principal elements of theoretical and practical controversies in the area of financial institutions. Contemporary issues facing these institutions in conjunction with historical and evolutionary developments are a hallmark of the course. Not open to students with credit in FIN 430. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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This course stresses the practical applications of real estate analysis that can be drawn from theoretical foundations to assist the real estate manager in long-range planning. Particular emphasis is placed on real estate valuation, financing, conveyance, tax consequences of ownership and the role of government in real estate. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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Apply finance principles to measure and manage the value of companies using a professional's step-by-step approach. In this course, students estimate free cash flows, economic value added, and cost of capital. They also forecast accounting statements, compare absolute and relative valuation techniques, and evaluate restructuring opportunities and potential flexibility options. Not open to students with credit in FIN 400/417 Business Valuation. Prerequisite: FIN 701. (Recommended: FIN 745 and FIN 746). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course provides the student with practical portfolio experience. Students actually and collectively manage funds in an endowment account for the benefit of the University and the School of Business. Experienced instructors, speakers, and financial analysts from Wall Street give the class a hands-on real life experience in analyzing and managing securities. The student will be familiarized with many different applied valuation procedures such as cash flows and growth models in an event driven context, as well as market capitalization techniques. Individual securities and stock options are analyzed on a continuing basis for inclusion or exclusion in the portfolio. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 450; FIN 410 substitutes for FIN 705 as a prerequisite. Enrollment by application only. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The economic determinants of exchange rates are discussed. This is followed by an examination of the financing problems faced by the multinational corporation and the international portfolio manager, arising from the international nature of their environment. Topics can include split, forward, futures, and options markets in foreign currency, international risk management, purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, covered interest arbitrage, and contemporary issues in international financial management. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 420. Prerequisite: FIN 701 and BE 702 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course examines the use of forwards, futures, SWAPs, and related financial derivatives for hedging, arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation, mechanics, valuation, and management techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 425. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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This course examines the use of options and related financial derivatives for hedging, arbitrage, and speculative purposes in the global environment. The course focuses on understanding how firms can manage interest rate risk, exchange rate risk, and commodity price risk using these derivatives. The emphasis is on understanding the motivation, mechanics, valuation, and management techniques behind financial engineering with these derivatives, as practiced by firms and individuals to maximize value in global markets. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 425. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the evaluation of fixed asset investment opportunities. Important topics are: cash flow analysis, estimation of required rates of return, risk analysis, and long-term investment analysis. Not open to students with credit in FIN 468. Prerequisite: FIN 310 or 415 or 701 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the theory and practice of how businesses raise funds. Important topics are: long-term capital markets and sources of long-term financing, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, and a variety of long-term financing problems. Not open to students with credit in FIN 468. Corequisite: FIN 745 or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies. A mixture of lectures and cases is used to expose students to various topics in entrepreneurial finance. Topics include identifying good opportunities, placing a quantitative value on these opportunities by using different valuation techniques (discounted cash flows, relative valuation, and the Venture Capital method), overview of the venture capital (VC) industry, VC contracting, analysis of term sheets, raising capital from angel investors and corporate venture capitalists. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 466. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential private companies. A mixture of lectures and cases is used to expose students to various topics in entrepreneurial finance. Topics include financing start-ups through private debt and government sources, mezzanine financing, using strategic alliances as an alternative way to fund start-ups, overview of venture capital in developed countries and emerging markets, harvesting the new ventures through an initial public offering, merger, or a buyout, and the challenges associated with each exit venue. This course is not open to students with credit in FIN 466. Prerequisite: FIN 701. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts, methodologies, and applications of risk analysis and modeling. This course is designed primarily to develop practical modeling skills with spreadsheet software. To accomplish this, material from across the finance discipline will be covered. Examples from corporate finance, investments, financial derivatives, real estate, and personal finance will be used to demonstrate modeling. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 and FIN 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of finance to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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This course provides a seminar format for a discussion of the currently prevalent research topics, methods, and problems being addressed in the area of finance. All first year PhD students in finance will enroll in this course their first semester in the doctoral program. LEC
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(S) This course is designed primarily for doctoral candidates in business administration. The basic Classical and Keynesian macroeconomic models are explored, along with extensions of these models. Concentration is placed on the role of monetary, fiscal, and trade policies, and the dialogues concerning stabilization policy, the unemployment-inflation tradeoff, wealth effects, rational expectations, and international policy issues. The focus is on a comparative static analysis of equilibrium, and the stability of equilibrium. Prerequisite: ECON 522 and MATH 115 and (MATH 116 or MATH 121), or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed to develop the students' analytical abilities. Course material is of a theoretical and empirical nature. Advanced topics in financial management of business firms are covered. Special emphasis is given to long-term financing topics. Prerequisite: FIN 705 (BUS 751) and FIN 706 (BUS 752). LEC
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A study of advanced topics in investments, capital markets, and portfolio theory. Special emphasis is given to the theory of efficient markets. The course is designed to cover recent analytical and empirical literature in the investment area. Prerequisite: FIN 710 (BUS 753). LEC
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A survey of the academic literature in financial institutions. The reading list will vary depending on the instructor. May include both seminal theoretical papers and/or recent empirical studies on the role and importance of financial institutions in market economies. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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Applied music lessons for freshmen and sophomores not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for freshmen majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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One or two lessons per week. For freshmen and sophomores. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for sophomores majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 121-level until the music major has accumulated 4 credits (8 for performance majors). IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors not majoring in music. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 221-level until the music major has accumulated 8 credits. IND
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One or two lessons per week. For juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit. IND
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Applied music lessons for seniors majoring in music. Not for performance majors. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 321-level until the music major has accumulated 12 credits. IND
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Applied music lessons. Must be taken in the semester a recital is being performed and as required by the degree program. Not for performance majors. IND
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Applied music lessons for juniors and seniors majoring in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Performance majors must accumulate 16 credits at the 121/221 levels. IND
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For graduate students not majoring in flute. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. IND
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For graduate students majoring in flute. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three credits. IND
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A study of repertoire and performance practice relating to the baroque flute and recorder during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. LEC
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A study of repertoire and extended performance techniques of the twentieth century. LEC
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Individual instruction. Open only to students who have been admitted to the D.M.A. curriculum in flute. May be repeated for credit. Summer session limit one to three hours. RSH
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Maximum seven hours credit. THE
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A lecture-recital and scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A scholarly paper on a subject pertinent to the student's major field. Open only to candidates for the D.M.A. in performance and conducting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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Study of film as a visual art. Focus on communicative transaction between film viewer and film maker. Learning to read basic signs, syntaxes, and structures of cinematic language. Direct analysis of selected films. LEC
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